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Paradise Lost Paperback – Apr 29 2003

4.4 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics; Reissue edition (April 29 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140424393
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140424393
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.4 x 19.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 358 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,435 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

Review

“In this landmark edition, teachers will discover a powerful ally in bringing the excitement of Milton’s poetry and prose to new generations of students.”—William C. Dowling, Rutgers University
 
“This magnificent edition gives us everything we need to read Milton intelligently and with fresh perception.”—William H. Pritchard, Amherst College

From the Publisher

12 black and white engravings from the first illustrated edition, 1688 --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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First Sentence
This first book proposes, first in brief, the whole subject, man's disobedience, and the loss thereupon of Paradise wherein he was placed: then touches the prime cause of his fall, the serpent, or rather Satan in the serpent; who revolting from God, and drawing to his side many legions of angels, was by the command of God driven out of Heaven with all his crew into the great deep. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Milton's Paradise Lost is a masterpiece, but that does not mean it is easily read or that it is appealing to modern tastes.

The level of English in this poem is absolutely insane, and Milton floods the pages with his learnedness and his poetic writerly powers, which are near unbelievable. I don't think there's any question that there's some self-indulgence here - this work goes on too long by modern standards and some passages are difficult to enjoy. Sometimes you're just ready for Milton to be done with this and get on to the next thing. And Eve gets the lion's share of the blame for the ultimate failure of course; there's a level of condescension towards women there that will get your feminist side uppity and irritated.

But reading Satan's rebellious speeches and the incredible imaginative power of Milton's description of the war in heaven between the rebel angels and the good . . . there's passages here that have yet to fade and probably never will. When you consider that Milton was eyeing other great epics from the distant past while he was doing this, its no wonder he pulled out all the stops and tried to find just where his limits were.

So read in small pieces, because the language is incredible and dense and difficult to absorb more than 200 to 300 lines at a time.
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By FrKurt Messick HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on Feb. 8 2006
Format: Paperback
Of Man's first disobedience and the fruit
Of that forbidden tree whose mortal taste
Brought death into the world and all our woe,
With loss of Eden, till on greater Man
Restore us and regain the blissful seat
Sing, Heavenly Muse...
Not a lot people know that 'Paradise Lost' has as a much lesser known companion piece 'Paradise Regained'; of course, it was true during Milton's time as it is today that the more harrowing and juicy the story, the better it will likely be remembered and received.
This is not to cast any aspersion on this great poem, however. It has been called, with some justification, the greatest English epic poem. The line above, the first lines of the first book of the poem, is typical of the style throughout the epic, in vocabulary and syntax, in allusiveness. The word order tends toward the Latinate, with the object coming first and the verb coming after.
Milton follows many classical examples by personifying characters such as Death, Chaos, Mammon, and Sin. These characters interact with the more traditional Christian characters of Adam, Eve, Satan, various angels, and God. He takes as his basis the basic biblical text of the creation and fall of humanity (thus, 'Paradise Lost'), which has taken such hold in the English-speaking world that many images have attained in the popular mind an almost biblical truth to them (in much the same way that popular images of Hell owe much to Dante's Inferno). The text of Genesis was very much in vogue in the mid-1600s (much as it is today) and Paradise Lost attained an almost instant acclaim.
John Milton was an English cleric, a protestant who nonetheless had a great affinity for catholic Italy, and this duality of interests shows in much of his creative writing as well as his religious tracts.
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Format: Paperback
Milton's work is full of beautiful language and very memorable quotes. Even as a devout Christian, his views on the nature of man, woman, God and particularly Satan are fascinating and refreshing. The classic tale of Adam and Eve is given more life and beauty than I would have ever guessed. One of my favorite quotes from the work:
"The mind is its own place, and in itself can make a Heaven of Hell, a Hell of Heaven. What matter where, if I be still the same?" (Satan, Book 1)
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By FrKurt Messick HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on Dec 9 2005
Format: Paperback
Of Man's first disobedience and the fruit
Of that forbidden tree whose mortal taste
Brought death into the world and all our woe,
With loss of Eden, till on greater Man
Restore us and regain the blissful seat
Sing, Heavenly Muse...
Not a lot people know that 'Paradise Lost' has as a much lesser known companion piece 'Paradise Regained'; of course, it was true during Milton's time as it is today that the more harrowing and juicy the story, the better it will likely be remembered and received.
This is not to cast any aspersion on this great poem, however. It has been called, with some justification, the greatest English epic poem. The line above, the first lines of the first book of the poem, is typical of the style throughout the epic, in vocabulary and syntax, in allusiveness. The word order tends toward the Latinate, with the object coming first and the verb coming after.
Milton follows many classical examples by personifying characters such as Death, Chaos, Mammon, and Sin. These characters interact with the more traditional Christian characters of Adam, Eve, Satan, various angels, and God. He takes as his basis the basic biblical text of the creation and fall of humanity (thus, 'Paradise Lost'), which has taken such hold in the English-speaking world that many images have attained in the popular mind an almost biblical truth to them (in much the same way that popular images of Hell owe much to Dante's Inferno). The text of Genesis was very much in vogue in the mid-1600s (much as it is today) and Paradise Lost attained an almost instant acclaim.
John Milton was an English cleric, a protestant who nonetheless had a great affinity for catholic Italy, and this duality of interests shows in much of his creative writing as well as his religious tracts.
Read more ›
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