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Paradise Lost [Paperback]

John Milton , Gordon Teskey
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
Price: CDN$ 28.98 & FREE Shipping. Details
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Book Description

Jan. 1 2005 0393924289 978-0393924282 3rd Revised edition
The text of Milton's masterpiece has been freshly edited and is accompanied by a detailed introduction and expanded explanatory annotations. Spelling and punctuation have been modernised, the latter within the limits imposed by Milton's syntax. Relevant passages from the Bible and Milton's prose writings have been collected in the sources and backgrounds section. Classic interpretations are brought together with important recent scholarship surrounding the epic. A glossary and selected bibliography are also included.

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Review

“In this landmark edition, teachers will discover a powerful ally in bringing the excitement of Milton’s poetry and prose to new generations of students.”—William C. Dowling, Rutgers University
 
“This magnificent edition gives us everything we need to read Milton intelligently and with fresh perception.”—William H. Pritchard, Amherst College --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From the Publisher

12 black and white engravings from the first illustrated edition, 1688 --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Paradise Lost & Dore`s Prints Perfect Match Oct. 9 2010
Format:Hardcover
I already owned an antique copy of Milton`s poems but could not pass up getting a copy of Paradise Lost with Dore prints. Well worth buying ($27).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic work Feb. 8 2006
By FrKurt Messick HALL OF FAME TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
Of Man's first disobedience and the fruit
Of that forbidden tree whose mortal taste
Brought death into the world and all our woe,
With loss of Eden, till on greater Man
Restore us and regain the blissful seat
Sing, Heavenly Muse...
Not a lot people know that 'Paradise Lost' has as a much lesser known companion piece 'Paradise Regained'; of course, it was true during Milton's time as it is today that the more harrowing and juicy the story, the better it will likely be remembered and received.
This is not to cast any aspersion on this great poem, however. It has been called, with some justification, the greatest English epic poem. The line above, the first lines of the first book of the poem, is typical of the style throughout the epic, in vocabulary and syntax, in allusiveness. The word order tends toward the Latinate, with the object coming first and the verb coming after.
Milton follows many classical examples by personifying characters such as Death, Chaos, Mammon, and Sin. These characters interact with the more traditional Christian characters of Adam, Eve, Satan, various angels, and God. He takes as his basis the basic biblical text of the creation and fall of humanity (thus, 'Paradise Lost'), which has taken such hold in the English-speaking world that many images have attained in the popular mind an almost biblical truth to them (in much the same way that popular images of Hell owe much to Dante's Inferno). The text of Genesis was very much in vogue in the mid-1600s (much as it is today) and Paradise Lost attained an almost instant acclaim.
John Milton was an English cleric, a protestant who nonetheless had a great affinity for catholic Italy, and this duality of interests shows in much of his creative writing as well as his religious tracts.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic work Dec 9 2005
By FrKurt Messick HALL OF FAME TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
Of Man's first disobedience and the fruit
Of that forbidden tree whose mortal taste
Brought death into the world and all our woe,
With loss of Eden, till on greater Man
Restore us and regain the blissful seat
Sing, Heavenly Muse...
Not a lot people know that 'Paradise Lost' has as a much lesser known companion piece 'Paradise Regained'; of course, it was true during Milton's time as it is today that the more harrowing and juicy the story, the better it will likely be remembered and received.
This is not to cast any aspersion on this great poem, however. It has been called, with some justification, the greatest English epic poem. The line above, the first lines of the first book of the poem, is typical of the style throughout the epic, in vocabulary and syntax, in allusiveness. The word order tends toward the Latinate, with the object coming first and the verb coming after.
Milton follows many classical examples by personifying characters such as Death, Chaos, Mammon, and Sin. These characters interact with the more traditional Christian characters of Adam, Eve, Satan, various angels, and God. He takes as his basis the basic biblical text of the creation and fall of humanity (thus, 'Paradise Lost'), which has taken such hold in the English-speaking world that many images have attained in the popular mind an almost biblical truth to them (in much the same way that popular images of Hell owe much to Dante's Inferno). The text of Genesis was very much in vogue in the mid-1600s (much as it is today) and Paradise Lost attained an almost instant acclaim.
John Milton was an English cleric, a protestant who nonetheless had a great affinity for catholic Italy, and this duality of interests shows in much of his creative writing as well as his religious tracts.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars I enjoyed it Feb. 10 2004
By M
Format:Paperback
In response to 'A Magnificent Failure': Yes, Milton was arrogant, and his language certainly does get high-flown...but it is often very beautiful, to my taste anyway. I especially loved the descriptions of Milton's world--Hell, Eden, and Heaven--in the first few books. After that the poetry isn't quite so sublimely beautiful, but it remains quite pleasurable, and Milton's play with ideas kept me interested anyway. It is true that Eve isn't a well-drawn woman (nor is Adam really a well-drawn man in terms of psychological realism) and the male fantasy-fulfilment that contributed to her character is distracting. Nevertheless, by the end of the book I wasn't as disturbed by the character of Eve as I thought I might be. By my own 21st century standard Milton's views on women are deplorable, but his attitude seems to me more ambivalent than uniformly misogynist. You can't expect Milton to be completely independent of his culture, and 17th century England was itself ambivalent about women. Eve is one of the three dominant personalities in the book (well, four if you include Milton's!)and as a woman her role in Milton's universe is quite important, if limiting to her by modern western standards.
Overall, as long as the reader keeps in mind that he or she need not agree with Milton's ideas, reading Paradise Lost can be a pleasurable and thought-provoking experience.
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Most recent customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent epic
The succinct and useful forward to this edition gives the uninitiated Milton reader a wide variety of controversies and themes to be mindful of when reading this epic poem.
Published on June 24 2012 by Zephyr_Northwind
5.0 out of 5 stars Best enjoyed in small pieces, perhaps?
Milton's Paradise Lost is a masterpiece, but that does not mean it is easily read or that it is appealing to modern tastes. Read more
Published on May 3 2010 by Rodge
3.0 out of 5 stars Sing Goddess
of how the malodorous oaf Milton did share in bold flatulence his heretical views and cause much stink in the bedroom of Tucker who did paw through that man of bad wind's pages,... Read more
Published on July 11 2004 by Loudon Is A Fool
4.0 out of 5 stars More verse and rhyme than you can shake a stick at
Even if you can't appreciate Classical epics and copious amounts of poetic language, this book is still written good enough for one to appreciate. Read more
Published on May 18 2004 by Lanny
2.0 out of 5 stars A magnificent failure.
"Paradise Lost is a book that, once put down, is very hard to pick up again," Samuel Johnson wrote of Milton's massive work, and added that no one ever wished it to be any longer... Read more
Published on Dec 11 2003 by Fan of Fred Williamson
1.0 out of 5 stars Bad Book
Man, I had to read this book. It was so boring and hard to read. Skip it or read the cliff notes if at all possible.
Published on Dec 10 2003
5.0 out of 5 stars This put Milton among the likes of Dante, Homer and Virgil
This is John Milton's masterpiece, though not the great epic he had intented to create. He actually wanted to write one about his beloved England, something along the lines of... Read more
Published on Nov. 7 2003 by Robert Riley
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best Work of Literature in the English Language
Milton's "Paradise Lost" is the best work of literature in the English language, bar none. Read more
Published on Oct. 30 2001 by joetheproofer
5.0 out of 5 stars Incredibly valuable
I was assigned to read Paradise Lost on my own over the summer and I am so glad that I chose the Norton Critical edition. Read more
Published on Aug. 22 2000 by J. L. Rishe
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