Passed On: African American Mourning Stories, A Memorial and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Passed on: African American Mourning Stories, a Memorial Paperback – Sep 3 2003


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 31.89 CDN$ 17.21

2014 Books Gift Guide
Thug Kitchen, adapted from the wildly popular web site beloved by Gwyneth Paltrow ("This might be my favorite thing ever"), is featured in our 2014 Books Gift Guide. More gift ideas

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Paperback: 248 pages
  • Publisher: Duke Univ Pr (Tx) (Sept. 3 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0822332450
  • ISBN-13: 978-0822332459
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 15.9 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 345 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #869,783 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Black StudiesAfrican-American burial and embalming rituals, funeral services and undertaking industry are all examined in Passed On: African American Mourning Stories, a cultural analysis of death and dying among 20th-century black Americans. Duke University English professor Karla F.C. Holloway combines historical research with interviews of present-day undertakers and others as she chronicles the discrimination and violent threats faced by black funeral parlor owners; the development of rituals like open-casket services and processions; and the influence of disproportionately violent black deaths on mourning practices. Punctuated with Holloway's personal stories (including that of her son's death), the book is an elegantly written survey for general readers and cultural historians alike.

Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Booklist

Holloway shares her research into the seldom-explored subject of death and dying in the African American community. Confining her investigation to contemporary mourning rituals, she interviewed countless numbers of funeral directors, ministers, casket makers, physicians, and bereaved friends and relatives. By interweaving these conversations with visits to the gravesites of prominent black Americans and examples of death and grief as portrayed in literature, music, and the media, she provides an in-depth analysis of the unique psychology of death prevalent in African American society. According to the author, African Americans live more closely and deal more realistically with the philosophical concept and physical reality of death than do most other Americans. This close association with grief and tragedy has culminated in a number of distinctive religious and secular ceremonies and traditions that are examined in this fascinating sociological survey. Margaret Flanagan
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Quiet as it's kept, if the question "Who's got the body?" had been asked very early in the twentieth century, the answer could have been white folk. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Hardcover
This book has a very detailed description of the deathcare industry as it relates to African-Americans. Once you get past the emotional prologue that recounts the death of the author's son, you get a very engaging story of the funeral industry, the history of black deaths in the US, and the importance of community during times of bereavement. On the lighter side, there is discussion of "the show" associated with African-American funerals. The truth and insights in this discussion allowed me to relive my experience of going to rural southern funerals. It particularly reminded me of playing TAPS, hidden behind moss-covered oaks during funerals for veterans. The sermon in the final chapter is pure poetry--the kind I would want at my "final performance." Passed On should be read by anyone who has ever wondered about any aspect of the death industry or who has an interest in American history.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As one who is employed in the death care industry I read the book hoping to learn about the liabilities that confronted African Americans both as bereaved families and as funeral providers. Of the 4 chapters the first and last really show, in my opinion, these problems whereas the second and third cover the reasons why these people die, be it race riots, lynchings, police problems, gang wars and so on. Although the stories depicted in those chapters are more than sad, they do not really address the crux of the book - the African American dealing with the after death. I was hoping for more information in that respect.
If nothing else the descriptions and reasons for the murders of these people is enough to make you wish this sort of thing could never happen again.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By A Customer on Aug. 7 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book captures the reader and doesn't let go. The story of death and dying is itself fascinating...but the way in which she weaves the story of her son's death; the history of black funeral directors; and the incredible photos make this a must- read book.
All you want to know about death, dying, and burial...and all we must know about these African American traditions.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Death: the closing act March 13 2002
By "clydedrake" - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This book has a very detailed description of the deathcare industry as it relates to African-Americans. Once you get past the emotional prologue that recounts the death of the author's son, you get a very engaging story of the funeral industry, the history of black deaths in the US, and the importance of community during times of bereavement. On the lighter side, there is discussion of "the show" associated with African-American funerals. The truth and insights in this discussion allowed me to relive my experience of going to rural southern funerals. It particularly reminded me of playing TAPS, hidden behind moss-covered oaks during funerals for veterans. The sermon in the final chapter is pure poetry--the kind I would want at my "final performance." Passed On should be read by anyone who has ever wondered about any aspect of the death industry or who has an interest in American history.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Absorbing, eloquent Aug. 7 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This book captures the reader and doesn't let go. The story of death and dying is itself fascinating...but the way in which she weaves the story of her son's death; the history of black funeral directors; and the incredible photos make this a must- read book.
All you want to know about death, dying, and burial...and all we must know about these African American traditions.
Good reading June 15 2014
By So. Calif book reader - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Some of it was kind of political motivated but the majority was funeral history related and I found it a good read. I would love to find that Ebony magazine that had a section on black funerals from the 1950's. Very difficult to locate.
Insightful June 3 2014
By Gina Cabiddu - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book was much harsher than I expected. But them it was naive if me to think there wouldn't be discussion if the extreme violence that brings such powerful mourning stories as the title suggests. Enticing read and highly perspective changing.
The other victim March 12 2014
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I understand a mother's anguish over the death of a son, Bem Holloway, but I wish she had also described her grief for the pain he caused his victims. Her son held a young college girl hostage for 7 hours, raped her, choked her, and then stabbed her and left her to die. He was shot while trying to escape from prison, where he was serving a 95-year sentence. Surely that young girl is as much a victim as the Holloway family.


Feedback