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Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture Hardcover – Nov 5 2002


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional; 1 edition (Nov. 5 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0321127420
  • ISBN-13: 978-0321127426
  • Product Dimensions: 23.7 x 19.2 x 3.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #55,930 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Steve Loughran on June 28 2003
Format: Hardcover
This book has been getting a lot of hype -the followup to Fowler's seminal Refactoring, enterprise edition of the GoF, etc etc.
It's a dense and informative read. If you didnt know anything about cricket, you will by the end, as all its examples are basd on the game. I, sadly, find cricket deadly dull as a consequence of having it force fed at me in the UK educational system. This may bias me against the examples somewhat.
As to the content, well, it is a set of patterns focused on 'enterprise' applications. In this context, enterprise means server-side code connected to a database, usually with a Web Front end. Martin goes into superb depth on how to map from databases to java and .net objects, making you think about whether or not the stuff that your framework of choice gives you is the right tool for the job. Sadly, all that does is make you more aware of the failings of EJB, JDBC, whatever .NET has. Because, unless you are going to roll your own database bridge by hand, you are going to have to run with what they give you -whether it [stinks] or not.
I dont do much O/R mapping. I hand it off to tools like Castor and worry about my real problems: shipping web services to implausible deadlines to be managed by an operations team that phone me whenever something goes wrong. So my problems are web service related 'good API design', and 'executional patterns': how to design code that is easily tested, what is a good strategy for implementing configuration information, what is a good XML format for future flexibility. I also have to worry about the client side: how to architect a client that works well over long haul and intermittent links, and how to present this to the user.
Martin's book doesnt cover these kind of problems.
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By khorchani on Feb. 6 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Even if many of the patterns are used via frameworks, it is useful to understand the mechanics and the ideas behind them.
I apprecait the Fowler writing style. it's clear and easy to undersatnd even for those not fluent in english. This book will step you up if y're not already there.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In this book, Fowler defines the standards that all programmers should know. These design patterns are used every day in real world applications and he makes a lot of valid points and guidelines to follow when programming. This is an essential book in my opinion for any programmer, especially J2EE developers.
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By just a student on Sept. 16 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
More than 10 years after it was first published this book is still relevant.

Read it if you want to understand:
Databases,
ActiveRecord,
Hibernate,
Web frameworks,
Enterprise systems,
and anything in between.

Don't read it if you think programming is boring or your level of expertise is unmatched or you know enough.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Vladimir Levin on Feb. 8 2004
Format: Hardcover
Overall, I was disappointed by this book. I develop business applications, and I was hoping this book would provide practical insights about such applications, more specifically in the database/web realm. While this book does contain some interesting pieces of information, it really is not of immense value to a developer such as myself. Here's why:
This book is a bit of a mishmash of different topics, but the vast majority of it (I'd say 75% or more) consists of ideas for object-relational mapping. Since most developers would use existing tools for object-relational mapping (in the Java realm, see Hibernate, JDO, etc.), I fail to see the real usefulness of this book for most developers building business (web) apps. Further, this kind of book encourages people who don't have the necessary expertise to try rolling their own OR mappers, which is simply not a good idea.
It's too bad, because the book starts off promisingly enough with 3 general approaches to business apps: Transaction Script: The procedural/transactional approach; Domain Model: The OO approach; and Table Module: The data-cetric approach. So far so good. Unfortunately the book then seems to steer off to the topic of "Fun With OR Mapping." It's not as sexy, but I think that's perhaps what the title of this book should have really been! The book then goes on to talk about different ways to architect Web applications, again mostly getting into how to develop framework code, which one largely would take for granted if one is deciding which framework to use rather than rolling one's own. Finally the book talks a bit about locking strategies (pessimistic, optimistic) and then presents a few generic items (e.g. the concept of a Money class or a Registry class).
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By ws__ on March 22 2004
Format: Hardcover
Martin Fowler is a brand name for lucid ("UML distilled"), maturity enhancing ("Refactoring" for the practical side and the great "Analysis Patterns" for the modeling side) top notch books for software professionals. This book even has on its front cover a label telling us it is a "Martin Fowler Signature Book". This book was a disappointment. In the introduction Fowler claims much less. This book should be merely "useful". It is much better than that. It is good.
So what is the problem? The title is misleading. It is about patterns, but not really about enterprise applications. I am not in the subject of enterprise applications. I never ever have touched a program like SAP or a language like COBOL. But I encountered nearly every problem addressed in the patterns. Even the money class has corresponding problems in other fields: a Voltage has both a value and a unit. Also having complaints about the fact that 3 times 33% are less than 100% are always common.
What is this book about? It is basically about problems you have in moderately big applications. How do you connect a relational database with its structure and transactionality to a system, especially an object-oriented system (but not only)? And how do you connect to the user interface, especially a web interface. Also it contains a lot of useful small patterns at the end. As you can see: a lot of valuable stuff for many people. Yes and you get the deep judgments and fine humor of Martin Fowler too.
What is the main problem? This book is not really suited for actual reading. It contains an introductory part of a hundred and a reference part of four hundred pages. The introduction part is annoying to read.
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