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Penguin 75: Designers, Authors, Commentary (the Good, the Bad . . .) Paperback – Jun 29 2010


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About the Author

Chris Ware, an award-winning illustrator and cartoonist, has drawn for many publications, including The New York Times Magazine and The Chicago Reader. Ware’s most well-known work includes Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth and the Acme Novelty Library series.

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Amazon.com: 6 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Almost all good, no bad, very little ugly Aug. 24 2010
By C. Ebeling - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Book covers matter to me. I am a general reader with an appreciation for design. A good cover, as far as I am concerned, has aesthetic intelligence in its own right but must also serve as a pointer to the heart of the content; it should have a respectful, if not amorous dialogue with the content or the author. I happen to think that we are living in something of a golden era of book cover design and the art department at Penguin has contributed to making it so. In celebration of Penguin's benchmark year, Penguin 75 is a neat, affordable art book that presents covers from the last several years, the art director and designer's commentary, and, occasionally, the author's take. For the consumer like me, it is a fascinating look at how covers end up the way they do; for the graphics student, it should be highly instructive.

The collection was edited by Paul Buckley, art director, who also worked as a designer and supervisor on most of the projects. They reflect his aesthetic, which is broad and comes down on the edgy side. He is very happy with the series of classics covers created by comics artists. For me, the designs created by tattoo artists were more successful in terms of giving the temperature of the book within. One of the reasons why this collection and Penguin covers in general succeed is Buckley's willingness to try nontraditional designers. David Byrne, author of The Bicycle Diaries, contributed his own drawing to his cover. Another artist won a contest run through Creativity Magazine. My favorite story is that of who produced the Twitterature cover. Apparently, young interns at Penguin get to do more than run the copy machine.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Gorgeous covers on parade Feb. 18 2011
By Jessica Weissman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you love books or just their covers, this is a gorgeous treat. 75 outstanding Penguin covers are displayed, each with some background information and a short discussion by one of its creators. In many cases alternate versions are also shown and you can decide whether the right one was chosen.

It's a visual feast for anyone and, if you're not aware of cover design issues, a brief education too. I still care more about the contents than the cover, but I now know much, much more about how covers are designed.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Penquin at 75 hits the mark! July 19 2010
By James O.S.CT - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you love book design, this anniversary edition of PENGUIN 75, really hits the mark. Over the years Penquin paperbacks have been designed and branded to dominate the shelves of every book store I've had the pleasure of browsing. Within this volume you'll discover a collection of exciting new design solutions to some timeless classic titles. Nathaniel Hawthorne and Jane Austen would have been proud!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Judging a Book By Its Cover June 3 2012
By Anne Salazar - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Judging books by their covers is not a bad thing at all when the covers are as clever as these. Books about books are usually interesting to a reader, but I doubt if many book publishers would be able to publish a book about their covers that is as informative, artistic, and as much fun to read as this one. I especially love Penguin's Graphic Classics Series, although I will admit that the first time I bought one -- The Portable Dorothy Parker, or maybe Candide, or was it Lady Chatterley's Lover? -- I thought it was illustrated throughout, but was only slightly disappointed when I discovered it wasn't because I love those books anyway and the covers are so detailed and so clever!

Additionally, as with every book about books I have read over the years, I found several that I haven't read or haven't heard about and that piqued my interest such as The Penguin Book of Gaslight Crime and My Little Blue Dress by Bruno Maddox. If you love to browse books as I do, this will be a delightful way to spend an evening or two.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A quick and fun read Jan. 26 2014
By Trang Nguyen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A quick and fun read about the woes and joys behind designing book covers--a process many design students assume that could only mean play and fun. They're not completely wrong, but it's only one side of the coin. The content doesn't offer any in-depth insight into the creative process or the publishing business, just enough information to let us know that it often requires a complicated, or even messy, collaboration. My favorite part was when authors employ their literary skills to express their hatred for the design(s) they didn't agree with.


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