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Penguin Classics Jane Eyre Hardcover – Oct 26 2010


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 608 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classic; Reprint edition (Oct. 26 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141040386
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141040387
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 5.2 x 20.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 680 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (571 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #37,033 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"At the end we are steeped through and through with the genius, the vehemence, the indignation of Charlotte Brontë."
--Virginia Woolf


From the Trade Paperback edition. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

Cambridge Literature is a series of literary texts edited for study by students aged 14-18 in English-speaking classrooms. It will include novels, poetry, short stories, essays, travel-writing and other non-fiction. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on Jan. 11 2009
Format: Paperback
It's hard to imagine a better gothic romance than "Jane Eyre" -- gloomy vast houses, mysterious secrets, and a brooding haunted man with a dark past.

In fact, Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has pretty much everything going for it -- beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let her brains and courage shine brighter. And it's all wrapped in the misty, haunting atmosphere of a true gothic story -- madwoman in the attic and all.

Jane Eyre was an orphan, abused and neglected first by relatives, then by a boarding school run by a tyrannical, hypocritical minister. But Jane refuses to let anyone shove her down -- even when her saintly best friend dies from the wretched conditions.

But many years later, Jane moves on by applying to Thornfield Hall for a governess position, and gets the job. She soon becomes the teacher and friend to the sprightly French girl Adele, but is struck by the dark, almost haunted feeling of her new home.

Then she runs into a rather surly horseman -- who turns out to be her employer, Mr. Rochester, a cynical, embittered man who spends little time at Thornfield. They are slowly drawn together into a powerful love, despite their different social stations -- and Rochester's apparent attentions to a shallow, snotty aristocrat who wants his wealth and status.

But strange things are happening at Thornfield -- stabbings, fires, and mysterious laughter. Jane and Rochester finally confess their feelings to each other, but their wedding is interrupted when Rochester's dark past comes to light. Jane flees into the arms of long-lost family members, and is offered a new life -- but her love for Rochester is not so easily forgotten...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Sonia Frances on May 28 2010
Format: Paperback
Charlotte Bronte's 'Jane Eyre' has pretty much everything going for it - beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let her brains and courage shine brighter. And it's all wrapped in the misty, haunting atmosphere of a true gothic story - madwoman in the attic and all.

A timeless classic - I only wish she had written a sequel! Other books I'd recommend although very different are:

Godstone - The Kairos Boxes

Screwtape Letters
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By T. Zuk on July 14 2008
Format: Paperback
Please do not listen to the reviewer who said this book has no plot. It is a story of emotions, hardship, women's rights, madness, intense love and intrigue. There are many twists and turns - and lots of conflict and pain to come to terms with. It will make you laugh out loud and cry. Maybe the previous reviewer was too young to understand and was disappointed that Jane Eyre wasn't like the plot of 'The OC' or something... If you are looking for a mature and engrossing tale, this is the one. Charlotte Bronte was the most awesome writer and her style never fails to draw in the reader from the first page.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dave_42 TOP 1000 REVIEWER on Oct. 3 2009
Format: Paperback
On October 16th, of 1847, "Jane Eyre: An Autobiography", edited by Currier Bell (pseudonym of Charlotte Brontë) was published. It created some controversy at the time, as many believed it was written by a man. The novel was very popular when published, but critical reaction to it varied. Today, it is clearly a classic, the development of a young woman, who does not fit into the stereotype of a nineteenth century woman. She is not submissive, and she struggles to avoid being dependent on others. The original publication was in three volumes, but this Penguin Classics edition is based on the third edition of Jane Eyre, and it is the last edition which Charlotte Brontë edited and corrected.

The story covers Jane's life from her childhood until her marriage. The childhood chapters can be split into two sections, those where Jane, an orphan, was being raised by her Uncle's family, but her uncle has passed away and her aunt does not like her, but was forced to promise to take care of her. The key parts of this section are Jane's being rejected by the closest thing she has to a family, her morality, and her independence, i.e. her refusal to conform. The second part of her childhood is when she is sent to attend a charity school, called Lowood, where the pupils have to make do with substandard food and clothing. Here Jane finds one teacher who treats her, and the other students, well, Miss Maria Temple. One of the key things in this section is the difference between religion and morality, symbolized by Mr. Brocklehurst a clergyman who is mostly responsible for the appalling conditions at Lowood, and Jane and Miss Temple on the side of morality.
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Format: Paperback
Jane Eyre being my favourite book, I have read any sequels, prequels or spin-offs that I could find:
- Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys, which tells the story from Bertha's point of view, including her time in the West Indies.
- Rebecca by Daphne DuMaurier. It is similar in the sense that the second Mrs. DeWinter in the book is haunted by the unseen presence of the first Mrs. DeWinter, just as Jane hears the maniacal cries of Bertha. There is the fact that Maxim is much older than the second Mrs. DeWinter, just as Rochester is much older than Jane. Then, finally there is the fire that destroys their stately old mansion, Manderley.
- The Ivy Tree by Mary Stewart. The parallels in that story are not as clear at first, but there is the young girl who falls in love with an already married man, and who runs away to escape from it all, and also the fire, and the destruction of an old majestic tree.
- a scifi version - Jenna Starborn by Sharon Shinn. In plot and structure it was almost exactly the same, following Brontë's narrative scene by scene, except for the transposition to a far-off planet in the distant future. I didn't think it was different enough, though, from the original to make it interesting in its' own right.
- How Nancy Drew Saved My Life by Lauren Baratz-Logsted. Even with the misleading Nancy Drew reference in the title, reading the book it was clear that it was Jane Eyre in the modern day in Iceland.
- The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde was a very different sort of take-off. It is a book that defies genre description - is it mystery, romance, alternative history, fantasy, or scifi? I think the consensus must be that it combines elements of them all.
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