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Penguin Classics Pride And Prejudice [Hardcover]

Jane Austen
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (557 customer reviews)
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Book Description

Oct. 26 2010 Penguin Classics
Part of "Penguin's" beautiful hardback "Clothbound Classics" series, designed by the award-winning Coralie Bickford-Smith, these delectable and collectible editions are bound in high-quality colourful, tactile cloth with foil stamped into the design. When Elizabeth Bennet first meets eligible bachelor Fitzwilliam Darcy, she thinks him arrogant and conceited; he is indifferent to her good looks and lively mind. When she later discovers that Darcy has involved himself in the troubled relationship between his friend Bingley and her beloved sister Jane, she is determined to dislike him more than ever. In the sparkling comedy of manners that follows, Jane Austen shows the folly of judging by first impressions and superbly evokes the friendships, gossip and snobberies of provincial middle-class life.

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Penguin Classics Pride And Prejudice + Penguin Classics Sense And Sensiblity + Penguin Classics Persuasion
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"It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife."

Next to the exhortation at the beginning of Moby-Dick, "Call me Ishmael," the first sentence of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice must be among the most quoted in literature. And certainly what Melville did for whaling Austen does for marriage--tracing the intricacies (not to mention the economics) of 19th-century British mating rituals with a sure hand and an unblinking eye. As usual, Austen trains her sights on a country village and a few families--in this case, the Bennets, the Philips, and the Lucases. Into their midst comes Mr. Bingley, a single man of good fortune, and his friend, Mr. Darcy, who is even richer. Mrs. Bennet, who married above her station, sees their arrival as an opportunity to marry off at least one of her five daughters. Bingley is complaisant and easily charmed by the eldest Bennet girl, Jane; Darcy, however, is harder to please. Put off by Mrs. Bennet's vulgarity and the untoward behavior of the three younger daughters, he is unable to see the true worth of the older girls, Jane and Elizabeth. His excessive pride offends Lizzy, who is more than willing to believe the worst that other people have to say of him; when George Wickham, a soldier stationed in the village, does indeed have a discreditable tale to tell, his words fall on fertile ground.

Having set up the central misunderstanding of the novel, Austen then brings in her cast of fascinating secondary characters: Mr. Collins, the sycophantic clergyman who aspires to Lizzy's hand but settles for her best friend, Charlotte, instead; Lady Catherine de Bourgh, Mr. Darcy's insufferably snobbish aunt; and the Gardiners, Jane and Elizabeth's low-born but noble-hearted aunt and uncle. Some of Austen's best comedy comes from mixing and matching these representatives of different classes and economic strata, demonstrating the hypocrisy at the heart of so many social interactions. And though the novel is rife with romantic misunderstandings, rejected proposals, disastrous elopements, and a requisite happy ending for those who deserve one, Austen never gets so carried away with the romance that she loses sight of the hard economic realities of 19th-century matrimonial maneuvering. Good marriages for penniless girls such as the Bennets are hard to come by, and even Lizzy, who comes to sincerely value Mr. Darcy, remarks when asked when she first began to love him: "It has been coming on so gradually, that I hardly know when it began. But I believe I must date it from my first seeing his beautiful grounds at Pemberley." She may be joking, but there's more than a little truth to her sentiment, as well. Jane Austen considered Elizabeth Bennet "as delightful a creature as ever appeared in print". Readers of Pride and Prejudice would be hard-pressed to disagree. --Alix Wilber --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"The wit of Jane Austen has for partner the perfection of her taste."
--Virginia Woolf


From the Trade Paperback edition. --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pride and Prejudice May 26 2004
By Adele
Format:Paperback
This is an amazing book; when I read it I just can't seem to put it down. This edition which is published by "Penguin Classics" proves to be a wonderful read because of the information included in the back.
Ms. Jane Austen does an impeccable job of describing the characters in the story. Each one has their own distinct personality which is part of what makes this book such a classic. Mrs. Bennet is especially cute, the way that she is always talking about the fact that she'd like her daughters to marry, and seems to think that it would prove to be the pinnacle of her life if one of them married into wealth. When Mr. Collins comes into the picture and decides to marry Charlotte, he can't stop praising the house in which will one day be his.
This is where the book really picks up. At the conclusion of volume one, an individual is left only to imagine what could possibly be happening with Mr. Bingley and his beloved Jane.
In this charming love story, two people learn to "get over themselves" and develop feelings for one another.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen, follows society's elite through the trials and tribulations of love, pride, money, and marriage negotiations. This novel takes place in 19th century England and revolves around the slow development of love found between two characters. The first of these characters is Elizabeth Bennet, a clever, beautiful, and spirited young woman. Pride and Prejudice begins, when Mrs. Bennet asks Mr. Bennet to call on their new neighbor, Mr. Bingley. Mr. Bingley has an income of 5 thousand pounds a year and is not married, so Mrs. Bennet hopes to marry one of her 5 daughters to him. Jane, the eldest daughter, and Mr. Bingley begin to like each other during a ball. Elizabeth, the second oldest, meets Mr. Darcy at the same ball. Darcy initially does not care for Elizabeth, and refuses to even dance with her.
However, as Elizabeth grows to dislike Darcy, Darcy starts to become very fond of her. She and Darcy meet again when she stays with Mr. Bingley, because her sister, Jane, has taken ill at their house. Ms. Bingley, the sister of Mr. Bingley, herself hopes to wed Darcy, and seeks to make Elizabeth less appealing to Darcy. After Jane's recovery she and Elizabeth return home. There they welcomed to their home by their cousin Mr. Collins, who, because of the inheritance customs of the times (the Bennet girls had no brothers), was the heir to the Bennet family home. Together, Elizabeth and her family travel to town, where they met Mr. Wickham. Mr. Wickham notices Elizabeth, who he found charming, and describes to her a terrible deed he alleges Darcy had committed against him. Wickham claimed that Darcy owed him money and had denied him of a promised avocation. This new information causes Elizabeth to despise Darcy even more.
Soon Mr.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Thanks Jane! July 7 2004
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I've read three incredible books lately and NONE of them were remotely connected by theme, style, or author. "Song of Solomon" was the first, "The Bark of the Dogwood" was the second, and "Pride and Prejudice" was the third. While all were excellent, P&P was so great for me, simply because I didnt' expect it to be great. If you are like I was before reading this wonderful book, you probably can't imagine what could be so wonderful about Pride and Prejudice. How can it be interesting, you're thinking, when it's written in such a stuffy time period? I'll stick with my science fiction/romance novels/westerns, thank you very much. And it's true, you can't find any lusty young rogues, aliens, or gun fights, but that doesn't keep it from being an extremely wonderful book to read. The characters are full of life, the plot well constructed, and the entire story full of charm and humour. Don't be put off by the language either. It takes some getting used to, but once you're going it's not only completely natural, but makes today's English seem completely dull and simple. I cannot stress enough how wonderful this book is. Also try "Bark of the Dogwood" and "Song of Solomon."
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Format:Mass Market Paperback
I have to say that I thoroughly enjoyed Pride & Prejudice. Although it has to be called a romance, I personally feel that the fascination is much more about the rules of behavior and courtship in Victorian society. The same story set in the modern day would not be nearly so interesting because you no longer have the rules to navigate that are present in the time in which it is set. It is the compliance with these rules and the reaction when they are not followed properly that makes the social structure of the time (as it is presented here) more like a chess game than a simple romance story. This given with characters and settings that have a feel to them that reminds me of Little Women made this book a great deal of fun to read. It was fast paced with plenty of intrigues.
The back of my book puts the entire plot into one short paragraph. I was at first concerned that this would take the fun out of the reading since who marries who in the end was spelled out right there. However, in reading it I realized that it is not WHAT happens in this book as much as it is HOW it happens and in this Austen is a true master. Essentially the story is of the five daughters of the Bennett family. The addle-brained mother has no other concern than to marry her daughters off and the detached father generally just makes fun of the whole situation. Jane and Elizabeth are the two eldest daughters and Jane forms an attachment early on to Bingley, a gentleman who has leased a house/estate nearby. When a pompous Mr. Darcy interferes in Jane's attachment to Bingley, Elizabeth is turned vehemently against him - a sentiment further deepened by aspersions made by Mr. Wickham, Mr. Darcy's father's godchild. As fate would have it, Mr.
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Most recent customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Yes, I finally read it!!
Mr. Darcy wrote Lizzie a 5 page letter. Omg! I consider myself lucky when my guy writes me a 5 sentence text. Romance is dead :(

But not in this book. Read more
Published 20 days ago by Book Cupid
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
love this book
Published 1 month ago by mmof7
5.0 out of 5 stars Love it!
Love it! It's neither thick nor heavy, so it's pretty easy to carry around. I'm gonna read this book on my flight.
Published 2 months ago by Blair Cao
4.0 out of 5 stars Good, but spelling errors.
I'm happy with this copy of Pride and Prejudice, although there are some spelling errors I came across in this copy, and in the blurb on the back. Read more
Published 4 months ago by E
5.0 out of 5 stars A witty woman, a display of stupidity and a parade of bizarre...
In her second novel, Jane Austen tells the story of Elizabeth Bennet, a bright 21 year-old woman, who is determined to marry only if she has the deepest love and respect for her... Read more
Published 13 months ago by Ladybug
5.0 out of 5 stars A very fun, easy and light read
This book is every bit as enjoyable as it was in the period it was written. It is enjoyable, the characters are engaging and feel realistic, and it deserves its long lasting... Read more
Published 17 months ago by Tannis Silver
5.0 out of 5 stars "I am a gentleman's daughter!"
So goes Elizabeth's passionate defence of her family against the horrid Lady Catherine near the end of the novel. Jane Austen's wonderful, funny, smart, and captivating. Read more
Published 20 months ago by AP
1.0 out of 5 stars KILL ME NOW!!
Nope, not for me one bit! Blah blah blah. Read it if you want a good reason to poke your eyes out.
Published on Aug. 27 2010 by book cruncher
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly enjoyable!
Published in 1817, twenty years before Queen Victoria came to the throne, this novel allows the reader to travel through time to a bygone era where the pace of life was much, much... Read more
Published on July 13 2010 by Pierre Gauthier
5.0 out of 5 stars A truth universally acknowledged
"Pride and Prejudice" is undoubtedly one of the most beloved classic novels in history -- it's had countless adaptations, sequels and homages lavished on it over the years. Read more
Published on May 16 2010 by E. A Solinas
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