Quantity:1
Add to Cart
or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.

More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
      

Perahia Plays H&S


Price: CDN$ 7.54 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
19 new from CDN$ 5.69 2 used from CDN$ 9.29

Frequently Bought Together

Customers buy this album with English Suites 136 CDN$ 8.77

Perahia Plays H&S + English Suites 136
Price For Both: CDN$ 16.31

Show availability and shipping details

  • This item: Perahia Plays H&S

    In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details

  • English Suites 136

    In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details

  • Performer: Murray Perahia
  • Composer: Handel; Scarlatti
  • Audio CD (March 18 1997)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Sony Music Canada
  • ASIN: B0000029UB
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #12,340 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. "Suite No. 5 in E Major, HWV 430"
2. "Suite No.3 in D minor, HWV 428"
3. "Suite No.2 in F Major, HWV 427"
4. Prelude
5. Allemande
6. Courante
7. "Air (with 5 variations; ""Harmonious Blacksmith"")"
8. "Chaconne in G Major, HWV 435"
9. Prelude
10. Allegro [Fugue]
11. Allemande
12. Courante
13. Air (with 5 variations)
14. Presto
15. Adagio
16. Allegro
17. Adagio
18. Allegro [Fugue]
19. "Sonata in D Major, K 491"
20. "Sonata in B minor, K 27"
See all 25 tracks on this disc

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ming Fan on Nov. 25 2013
Format: Audio CD
I have recording of Perahia Beethonven. It was only OK. I have long heard his Bach was good. So I decided to buy this Handel and Scarlatti to try out the Baroque Perahia... I love its. The Handel was smooth and energetic. His tone is warm and inviting. The Harnomious Black Smith was well played, and that Chaconne was even better. I have always thought Vitali's and Bach's Chaconne for solo violin was the Chaconne to listen to, but Handel's Chaconne for keyboard was written and well played.

The Scarlatti also had the warm smooth tone. It's not cold as Horowitz. It had a lot of zest. This may not sound like the baroque music we all know but it certainly sounds wonderful and was immensely enjoyable.

Overall, this CD was very easy listening perfect for a serious stereophile or just in the car. I strongly recommend it.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By "surferblue" on Dec 6 2003
Format: Audio CD
After spending about two weeks scouring for this CD, i finally managed to grab the only copy available from my local Tower Records store before deciding to order from Amazon.com as a last resort. I took this for a listen one night to perhaps have a little light soothing music before going to sleep, and it turned out that this CD kept me awake all night long.
In the opening Prelude (track 1) of Handel's Suite No. 5, the left hand comes in with just an ordinary single melodic line, but it is when the right hand comes in that the magic and enchantment begins, with the Allemande (track 2), Courante (track 3) and Air (track 4) following shortly. And it is at this point where I was captivated by not only Murray Perahia's playing but the shape and flow of the music. I knew that more was to come, and indeed, the Chaconne in G (track 5) blew me away totally, with breathtaking lyricism, beautiful contrapuntal weavings, flawless technique, controlled structural balance and startling virtuosity. All i could do was stare at my stereo while the CD spins and worship the sublimity of sound that was emanating from the speakers. This is baroque as I have never heard before.
By the end of the 8-minute Chaconne I found myself at a total loss for words. And this is only the 5th track out of 22. I'm finding it hard to describe in words the section with the bass octaves and running right-hand passages. Just take a listen to it and you'll see what I mean. I'll be searching for the Chaconne score the moment I have free time to spare. Needless to say the following tracks are equally brilliant. Unforgettable are the Air from Suite No. 3 (track 10) and Allegro from Suite No. 2 (track 13), my personal favourites alongside the Chaconne.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I bought this CD because I wanted to hear the Harmonious Blacksmith. I was pleasantly surprised. I didn't have a good impression of Murray Perahia because I have his Beethoven concerto recording which I thought was horrible. I decided to try because many reviews rave about his baroque playing. The reviews didn't lie. His playing is moving, soothing, and relaxing. I also love the Chacone so much, I decided to learn it. Great Handel.

People have always thought Horowitz is the leading authority on Scarletti, maybe back 50 yrs when he resurrect the composer's repertoire. I find Horowitz playing flat. Perahia is the opposite. His playing is warm and emotional. He showed me Baroque music can be attractive.

This CD is great. If you are not a baroque listener yet, this CD will break you in.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 27 reviews
43 of 48 people found the following review helpful
A welcome change. Feb. 11 1999
By Paul Geffen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
With this excellent release, Murray Perahia extends his recorded repertoire into the Baroque, exhibiting his usual thoughtfulness and sensitivity.
These are all more or less familiar works by now, having been recorded by the likes of Richter, Gould, Jarrett, Gilbert, and others. The Handel Suites have perhaps not quite the sophistication of the French and English Suites of J. S. Bach, but these charming essays are certainly worthy of repeated attention and do allow a wide range of interpretations.
Perahia has a cultivated and elegant tone, and generally takes a relaxed approach to the material, with an occasional tendency to rush at the codas. His interpretations emphasise the melodic over the rhythmic, and his fine technique seems at times to make the rough places smooth. Richter has a very different view of these pieces and brings out a rough and craggy side of these works which is not hinted at here.
The second half of the program consists of seven sonatas by Scarlatti. It begins with one of the best known of the 550 or so in Kirkpatrick's catalog. Kk. 491 is nicely played, with a good sense of the contrasts and lines.
A less familiar minor-key sonata, Kk. 27, is for me the high point of the recital. It is played with a lovely legato, subtle shading and measured dynamics. Perahia uses decrescendo to great effect here. The harmonic complexity of this piece seems to foreshadow Beethoven. This is one of the most subtle and interesting of Scarlatti's works.
Kk. 29 is given a very lively reading, even a little rushed, and could be presented with more contrast between the sections. In Kk. 206, Perahia employs a gentle, singing tone to good effect.
The intelligent sequence in which these sonatas are presented enhances the pleasure of listening. Overall this is a brilliant and very enjoyable foray into the Baroque from one of the masters. Highly recommended.
22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
If I could give it 6 stars I would Dec 6 2003
By "surferblue" - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
After spending about two weeks scouring for this CD, i finally managed to grab the only copy available from my local Tower Records store before deciding to order from Amazon.com as a last resort. I took this for a listen one night to perhaps have a little light soothing music before going to sleep, and it turned out that this CD kept me awake all night long.
In the opening Prelude (track 1) of Handel's Suite No. 5, the left hand comes in with just an ordinary single melodic line, but it is when the right hand comes in that the magic and enchantment begins, with the Allemande (track 2), Courante (track 3) and Air (track 4) following shortly. And it is at this point where I was captivated by not only Murray Perahia's playing but the shape and flow of the music. I knew that more was to come, and indeed, the Chaconne in G (track 5) blew me away totally, with breathtaking lyricism, beautiful contrapuntal weavings, flawless technique, controlled structural balance and startling virtuosity. All i could do was stare at my stereo while the CD spins and worship the sublimity of sound that was emanating from the speakers. This is baroque as I have never heard before.
By the end of the 8-minute Chaconne I found myself at a total loss for words. And this is only the 5th track out of 22. I'm finding it hard to describe in words the section with the bass octaves and running right-hand passages. Just take a listen to it and you'll see what I mean. I'll be searching for the Chaconne score the moment I have free time to spare. Needless to say the following tracks are equally brilliant. Unforgettable are the Air from Suite No. 3 (track 10) and Allegro from Suite No. 2 (track 13), my personal favourites alongside the Chaconne.
Perahia gives us a treat from Scarlatti in the second half of the programme, featuring 7 of the probably less known sonatas. I have played a selected few of Scarlatti's sonatas not in this CD and have enjoyed them, but with Perahia's playing of these Sonatas, particularly K27 (track 17), I feel compelled to dig out my Scarlatti Sonata score and start playing it, to indulge myself further in the characteristic excellence of Scarlatti.
What else can I say? After a 1st listening of this CD i immediately replayed it again, trying to make myself believe that such music ever existed and is played by one of the most accomplished pianists of our time. I am currently attempting one of J.S.Bach's Partitas, and I believe that if I could ever attain perhaps a fifth of Perahia's fluidity and lyricism palpably expressed in the Chaconne and incorporate it into the Partita, I would be greatly contented.
This is a disc that should never be missed. Take my word for it. A CD that is truly a treasure. And a big BRAVO to Murray Perahia, who already astounded me the first time he came to my country for a one night performance of Beethoven/Schubert repertoire.
30 of 37 people found the following review helpful
Think 19th & 20th Century Performance Practice! July 5 2002
By Craig Matteson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I went to music school in the late seventies to the mid-eighties during the height of the authentic interpretation movement. I believe that our musical culture is much better because of the experiments and study of this movement. I participated in an early music ensemble while attending music school and we performed a lot of interesting music always thinking about how it might have been done when it was first written.

However, I was also trained on the piano by a man whose teacher was a pupil of Liszt. I kept asking folks that if we wanted authentic performance practice the question should be whose performance practice. Isn't there a late nineteenth century performance practice? Of course, nowadays the early music people are indeed looking anew at the Romantic performance practices. And we are the better for it.

Here we have Handel and Scarlatti on the piano. And yes they sound wonderful when played well on the harpsichord, clavichord, virginal, and EVEN the piano. It is true that our present pianos sound nothing like the early pianos (which were made to sound a lot like harpsichords in any event). But this music does stand up to interpretations on the modern piano.

Here we have first rate playing and first-rate interpretation and excellent recording techniques (if just a tad wet for my taste). I don't want to give up hearing this music in any medium. I want to hear it on harpsichord AND on the piano AND on the clavichord AND on anything else a first rate musician wants to play it on. That is the key for me. Who's playing it?

I have to confess a weakness for ground basses and chaconne forms. Heck, I like the variation form - especially to play. The performance of the Chaconne in G Major here is quite wonderful. It caused me to dig out the music and have fun with it on my own piano. It is really fun to make the big octaves boom with those big chords. Kind of like an organ (another keyboard instrument that would work for the Chaconne).

The Scarlatti on this disk will make you want to get your music off the shelf and work on them so you can play the music more like Perahia. He has wonderful tone and fluidity. But he also has humor and wit - something so many virtuosi lack. Remember, this is fun music above all! This is Spanish court music (written by an Italian) and shouldn't ever be brooding or angst ridden. Perahia understands this. Listening to this can be a rib tickling (as well as an ivory tickling) experience.

Bravo!
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
The Master Pianist Oct. 1 2005
By J Scott Morrison - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Over the years I have compiled a list of pianists I want to be sure to hear in concert before I die. At the top of the list of remaining pianists yet unheard is Murray Perahia. He is, for me, possibly the most talented, most musical, most elegant pianist before the public. What, I asked myself, do I have to add to the sixteen reviews of this disc thus far submitted? Well, probably nothing startling. But I felt I needed to add my praise and a few comments about this essential disc.

The first, I suppose, is that I feel this disc IS essential. For anyone interested in baroque keyboard music this release (along with the other Bach and Handel discs Perahia has made) shows us how a modern pianist, using modern techniques and performance practices, has much to say about this so-familiar music. Of course, Perahia has a perfected technique. His left hand is possibly the best I've ever heard. Just listen to the incredibly fast runs, inflected on the fly, in some of the fast movements presented here (as in the presto variation of the 'Harmonious Blacksmith,' for instance). Nobody else has as fluid a legato or rounded tone as Perahia. His feather-light staccatos at breakneck speed are breathtaking. In the G minor Chaconne of Handel the left hand octaves ring out like a 16-foot organ pedal stop. And on and on. All of this is the service of elegance, grace and rich yet crystalline sonority. When drama is called for, it's there.

The extensive, admiring booklet notes, written by the late, great harpsichordist (and no mean pianist himself) Igor Kipnis, capture what is unique about Perahia.

This disc belongs on every musiclover's shelf.

Scott Morrison
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Why can�t all piano records be as good as this? Sept. 22 2001
By Andrea Paoletti (whisper73@katamail.com) - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
"Why can't all piano records be as good as this?", Gramophone's reviewer asks himself as he sets out to describe the many treasures, hidden and otherwise, of this remarkable achievement. Why, indeed. Which, of course, calls forth the question: shouldn't this repertoire be performed on that most individual and idiosyncratic of instruments, the harpsichord, for which it was originally conceived?
I am a convinced authenticist--I can no longer bring myself to listen to Baroque (or earlier) music that is not performed on period instruments: somehow it just doesn't sound right. And yet I am a great admirer of Perahia's accomplishments: it is not everyday that one finds such faultless technique, such command of shades and nuances, such surprising insights, such reserved, yet overwhelming lyricism, such versatility of touch--so apparent, for instance, in his masterly presentation of Chopin's Piano Works (1994, strongly recommended). So it was with mixed feelings, and equipped with the necessary dose of scepticism, that I first played this CD.
Well, it is unique. Everything one has learned to expect from Perahia is here; and, if possible, even more. He does not pretend that this is piano music; but by means of sheer artistry he succeeds in making wonderful piano music out of it. This is not to say that the more distinctive features of harpsichord music are lost on him: he is brilliant, crisp, and fast enough when needed. Simply, instead of merely mimicking the sound and feel of the harpsichord (a risky and usually unrewarding venture), he tries to make sense of these scores from a pianist's point of view. It seems to me that this approach reveals more than it conceals: for instance, the Harmonious Blacksmith Variations (Suite N. 5 in E Major, HWV 430) quite unexpectedly acquire a softly hypnotic ring which I found very appealing. The virtuosity is astounding, so second-nature that it almost fails to impress. The sound is excellent. (Two or three of the Scarlatti tracks were perhaps recorded at a slightly lower volume than the rest--but I might be wrong.)
Handel (1685-1759) and Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757) were contemporaries. Before heading off for what would become their adoptive countries (England and Portugal, respectively), the two player-composers even met twice, the first time in Venice, and then in Rome, where a trial of skill was held (Scarlatti turned out to be perhaps the better harpsichordist, while Handel excelled at the organ). The Handel pieces were all composed in Germany or in Italy, and are therefore early, pre-England works (before 1718), while the pieces by Scarlatti date from the 1730s, his Portuguese period. The tracks were recorded in 1996 in Vienna and Neumarkt, Germany. The booklet is mildly enlightening.

Product Images from Customers

Search


Feedback