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Performance & Cocktails Import


Price: CDN$ 3.24
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Frequently Bought Together

Performance & Cocktails + Word Gets Around + Language Sex  Violence Other
Price For All Three: CDN$ 15.36

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Dec 9 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Fontana Hip-O
  • ASIN: B00000ILO7
  • Other Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)

1. Roll Up And Shine
2. The Bartender And The Thief
3. Hurry Up And Wait
4. Pick A Part That's New
5. Just Looking
6. Half The Lies You Tell Ain't True
7. I Wouldn't Believe Your Radio
8. T-Shirt Sun Tan
9. Is Yesterday, Tomorrow, Today?
10. A Minute Longer
11. She Takes Her Clothes Off
12. Plastic California
13. I Stopped To Fill My Car Up

Product Description

Product Description

The Welsh indie rock trio's 1999 sophomore release featuring the U.K. top three hit 'The Bartender And The Thief' and the single 'Just Looking'. 13 tracks in all.

Amazon.ca

Stereophonics have evolved remarkably since they were a Welsh covers band who once prided themselves on the authenticity of their Jimi Hendrix set. Though that 1960s influence is muted on the follow-up to their million-selling debut, Word Gets Around, there are enough hard riffs and vocal shred on the power trio's sophomore outing to evoke more contemporary Seattle comparisons. His band's whirlwind success have informed singer-songwriter Kelly Jones' lyrics and vocal persona with some refreshingly wide-eyed cynicism to season his band's hard-edged pop bent. Though they evoke comparisons to everyone from the Faces to Alice in Chains, Stereophonics are clearly carving their own niche, especially on the infectious "She Take Her Clothes Off," the acoustic-rooted "I Wouldn't Believe Your Radio," the raucous opener "Roll Up and Shine," and "A Minute Longer." Like many ambitious young musicians before them, Jones and company have written about the world they've seen from the back of a bar, a tour bus window, and through TV's jaundiced filter; it's the cinematic grace, wit, and humanity of those observations that sets them apart from their Brit-pop peers and forecasts even greater things to come. --Jerry McCulley --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Audio CD
The Sterophonics' second album offers a refreshing offering of Brit Stomp Rock (except they are Welsh). What a great album, full of great guitar hooks and band leader Kelly Jones' personal views of life and relationships.
The album starts of with a rousing "Roll Up and Shine", as good an album opener as you will find. The next track "The Bartender and The Thief" (one of the album's highly succesful singles in the UK) is an up-uptempo rocker, just great. "Hurry Up and Wait" (another of the singles) is an accoustic-based slower song, contemplating the question of why we wanna hurry up all the time. "Half The Lies" is one of the album's best tracks, another stomp-along tracks, and the same can be said for the ironically titled "Is Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow", demonstrating Kelly Jones' smart lyrics. "I Wouldn't Believe Your Radio" (another single) stems from a dream Kelly had about "Ringo Starr and George Harrison singing in front of my parents' house", and while originally intended to be sung by drummer Stuart Cable (in the vein of Ringo Starr), in the end Kelly has lead vocals on this one.
This album was the break-through for the Stereophonics in the UK and it's easy to see why: great melodies, great guitar hooks, and interesting themes. The band has made some headway in the US this year (most recently opening for U2), but they deserve much better. BUY IT!
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Format: Audio CD
I was drifting aimlessly through the CD aisles at Best Buy one day, waiting for something - ANYTHING - to catch my eye that might prove to be the cure for what was quickly becoming the "rotation phase" in my CD collection, where although great albums in their own right, everything I owned had been overplayed and I was sick sick sick and tired. I then caught glimpse of Stereophonics: Performance and Cocktails, about which I remembered having seen a blurb in Rolling Stone calling it one of the most underrated and unknown albums of the year. So I took a shot in the dark, and BANG! I have a new favorite band. I found myself helplessly bobbing my head and tapping my hands on the steering wheel the whole ride home. The gritty Oasis-esque guitar styles, blended with the unique raspiness of Kelly Jones's vocals, and none of the awkward experimental/spiritual sound that veers some people away from bands like Kula Shaker (of whom I am also a huge fan), P&C is an unforgettable, inspirational album that shoots you uncontrollably into a positive state of mind. A+
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By A Customer on May 28 2001
Format: Audio CD
Performance&Cocktails comes two years after the wonderfull "Words gets aroud". This first CD was at that time my best,it was a mixture of country, pop rock and rock; what I would called soft rock. I bought Performance&cocktails my eyes closed. It turned out to be even better than the first one. They still kept the same style but more mature. We can see that they really were inspired from above!...We can fell happiness and energy in those two CDs. I think they really were at their nirvana when they wrote "is yesterday, tomorrow, today". With this song they reached the higher peek a rock song could ever get. Since then they seem to go down the mountain, as if glory was hard on them. In their third CD we almost fell that they are fed up with life. I do think that it's time for them to take a brake and then come back even stronger in 5 years. I want to say a big BRAVO for Their two first CDs. I just don't know how could somebody don't like their style. YOU HAVE TO GET THIS ONE AND TO OFFER IT TO SOMEBODY AS A GIFT. They need to get the recongnition they deserve.
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Format: Audio CD
Another fantastic offering from the 'Phonics. 'Roll Up And Shine' opens the album heroically while 'The Bartender And The Theif' is quite good. 'Hurry Up And Wait' is the joint best on the album with its amazing lyrics and brilliant, flowing music. 'Pick A Part' is a poppy affair and is a fantastic track, as is other single 'Just Looking', which has a rhythm guitar riff to die for. 'Half The Lies You Tell Ain't True' continues the albums high tempo, rock 'n' roll feel. The only real let down on the album is 'I wouldn't believe your radio' which has poor lyrics and is a bit of a bland and boring song. 'Is Yesterday, Tomorrow, Today?' is joint best as it is an epic track and a landmark song for the lads from Wales. It is right up there with 'Traffic', 'Too Many Sandwiches', 'Local Boy', 'Goldfish Bowl', 'Same Size Feet', 'Hurry Up and Wait' and 'Not Up To You' as one of the very best Stereophonics tracks. 'A minute longer', although a bit too slow and plain, is a good tune and once again the lyrical genius of Kelly Jones shines through, as it does in 'She Takes Her Clothes Off', another high point of the album. 'Plastic California' is yet another superb track and 'I stopped to fill my car up' is great, although not as good as the heavy, rock and roll live version (which you can get on 'Hurry Up And Wait' CD2).
Overall, not as good as the debut album but still a fantastic effort from the lads.
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By alexliamw on March 9 2001
Format: Audio CD
Whilst previous reviewers have accused the 'Phonics of not having the edge of such groups as the Manics, Travis etc, I would say that basically they have overcome the fact they will never equal such groups as the Manics (my favorite band of all time) and actually they sound nothing like the Manics- the only comparison available is they both play a (sort of) rock. But its not even of the same sort.
Lyrically Kelly Jones has avoided some of the cliches and metaphors of his contempories and written openly and honestly about life. In such songs as 'T-Shirt Suntan', 'A Minute Longer' and 'She Takes Her Clothes Off' he writes about simple subjects (but in fact A Minute Longer is touching). There seems to be a recurring lyrical theme of life itself as opposed to specific things in it ('Hurry Up And Wait', 'Pick A Part That's New', 'Just Looking') but some are about specific (fictional)events ('I Wouldn't Believe Your Radio', 'I Stopped To Fill My Car Up'). I Stopped To Fill My Car Up is interesting because he tells this heartbreak story and then says he made it up to get our attention.
Musically the albums ranges from soft indie to hard rock. There are the heavy fast hard rock songs ('Roll Up And Shine', 'The Bartender And The Thief', 'Half Of The Lies You Tell Ain't True'), the overall rockers ('Pick A Part That's New', 'T-Shirt Sun Tan', 'Plastic California'), the beautiful indie ('Hurry Up And Wait', 'She Takes Her Clothes Off', 'I Wouldn't Believe Your Radio') and introspective acoustic indie ('A Minute Longer', 'Is Yesterday Tommorow Today')- although even these use some electric guitars towards the end of the songs. Just Looking doesn't really fit into any of the catagories because it starts like acoustic indie and then turns into a fairly heavy rocker at the chorus.
Its possibly that this trio (who are adding an extra guitarist for their next album, Just Enough Education to Perform) may go on to achieve great things.
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