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Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood Paperback – Jun 1 2004


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Pantheon; REP edition (June 1 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 037571457X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375714573
  • Product Dimensions: 22.4 x 15 x 1.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 272 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (65 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #709 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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By chughes on June 15 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A real page turner. Made me want to learn more about this period of history. Very engrossing and told from a unique perspective.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird on July 19 2004
Format: Paperback
"Persepolis" marks the third book in the almighty triumvirate of great autobiographical graphic novels that examine injustice. Joining the ranks of "Maus" by Art Spiegelman and "Palestine" by Joe Sacco, "Persepolis" has garnered a remarkable amount of attention. Positive attention, that is. Suddenly it's getting high marks in everything from "Entertainment Weekly" to "VOYA: Voice of Youth Advocates". I wonder to myself whether or not author/artist Marjane Satrapi has been surprised by the mounds of attention. I also wonder how it is that she was able to take her own life story and weave it seamlessly with the history of her own country, Iran. This book is like an illustrated version of "Midnight's Children", but far darker and far more real.

The first image in "Persepolis" is the same image you see on its cover. Marjane sits wearing a veil in 1980 for the first time. As the story continues, Marjane explains her own beginnings as well as the beginning of the "Cultural Revolution". In her own life, Marjane was an only child of middle class intellectual parents. She experienced the usual childhood ups and downs. Sometimes she believed she was God's next chosen prophet. Other times she wanted to demonstrate with her parents in the street against the Shah. Over the course of her childhood Marjane learns more about the limits of class in Iran as well as the secrets behind her family history. She finds that her grandfather was a prince, her uncle a political prisoner for years, and her parents far braver than she ever expected. Marjane deals with the danger of challenging authority under the rule of religious extremists while growing up as a normal girl.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Nov. 4 2004
Format: Hardcover
The Autobiographies/Memoirs have it this year, i haven't read one i didn't like. "Persepolis" is at the top of the list of spell binding, well written gut wrenching truth and honesty.
Other books to read are: Nightmares Echo, Dry,Reading Lolita,Running With Scissors
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jason Preu on June 21 2004
Format: Paperback
Cultural relativists as far back as Sextus Empiricus or Michel Montaigne, or as recent as William Graham Sumner or Gilbert Harman, often make compelling arguments that there are no objective standards for judging other societies/beliefs. Yet Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis achieves in 153 pages what cultural relativists deny as possible and what most political pundits can never fully articulate: an informed and justifiable criticism of an existing cultural paradigm. Satrapi's method is deceptively simple: by using her own life stories as the premise, Satrapi builds an argument for criticizing culture.
Satrapi's autobiographicalized[1] self and society act both with wisdom and foolishness both before and after the revolution. The Iranian revolution meant to replace an unpopular government with one more responsive to the people's will. Until reading this book, I was unaware of any particular details of Iran during their revolution - mostly because I am a Westerner and generally not privy to accounts of day-to-day life in the Mid-East. On that basis, the cultural relativists may be right that I have no foundation on which to critically analyze the current state of Iran. Thankfully, however, Satrapi can criticize - using both an insider's and outsider's perspective. Satrapi undermines the denial of standards posited by cultural relativists by showing the reader that standards of comparison do indeed exist: standards related to varying degrees of freedom of expression, of decision, and from coercion. Satrapi's criticism is much more subtle than "old way good, new way bad." Instead, she draws for the reader situation after situation where real people are swept along with the flash flood of a revolution.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Banafsheh on July 25 2007
Format: Paperback
This is one of the very few historicallt accurate books written about Iran by authors living outside of Iran. As an Iranian, I think it's a necessary read for all non-Iranians who want to learn the truth about Shah's regime, the Iranian Revolution, and the Iran-Iraq war. It would also be a good read to all Iranians who never had a chance to learn the truth about the history of their country because of the false propaganda of the Islamic Republic.
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Format: Paperback
I was hesiatant to read persepolis, thinking, that despite it being a graphic novel, it would be dry. and even boring at times. but i was very wrong.

it follows young Marjane Satrapi and her expeirences in Iran during the revolution. Its a beautiful and funny and at times sad coming of age story, that I would reccomend to anyone. Marjane has become my idol, her story is remarkable is so many ways and is insprational to any women. I have read all her works but this will remain my faveorite.

Persepolis will have you laughing, crying and in shock all at once. Once you read it I gaurentee you will treasure it in your heart forever.
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By J. Pollock on Jan. 15 2009
Format: Paperback
Persepolis is the first and only graphic novel I have read but I found it to be really enjoyable! A great read which uses humour and sarcasm to construct Sartrapi's autobiographical account of growing up in Tehran amidst the fight to counter political extremism.
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