Persuasion (Annotated, Illustrated) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 30.81
  • List Price: CDN$ 52.99
  • You Save: CDN$ 22.18 (42%)
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Persuasion Audio CD – Audiobook, Feb 1 2007


See all 250 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Audio CD, Audiobook, Feb 1 2007
CDN$ 30.81
CDN$ 26.44 CDN$ 30.74
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
CDN$ 2.15

2014 Books Gift Guide
Yes Please, the eagerly anticipated first book from Amy Poehler, the Golden Globe winning star of Parks and Recreation, is featured in our 2014 Books Gift Guide. More gift ideas

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Join Amazon Student in Canada


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Artists to Watch
Artists to Watch
Be the first to hear about the hottest emerging artists. Featuring ten new artists each month, Artists to Watch will help you stay in the know when it comes to up-and-coming artists. See all of this month's picks

Product Details

  • Audio CD: 7 pages
  • Publisher: Naxos Audio Books; Unabridged edition (Feb. 1 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9626344369
  • ISBN-13: 978-9626344361
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 14.5 x 5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 386 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (82 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,168,127 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
Sir Walter Elliot, of Kellynch-hall, in Somersetshire, was a man who, for his own amusement, never took up any book but the Baronetage;1 there he found occupation for an idle hour, and consolation in a distressed one; there his faculties were roused into admiration and respect, by contemplating the limited remnant of the earliest patents;2 there any unwelcome sensations, arising from domestic affairs, changed naturally into pity and contempt. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Feb. 22 2008
Format: Paperback
Persuasion is Jane Austen's most sophisticated story and writing. She lovingly and incisively demonstrates the problems of being a well-bred sensitive person in a society that's more intrigued by social standing, money, and polite conversation than by good character.

Persuasion is Anne Elliot's story. The title's initial allusion is to Anne's brush with matrimony when a promising, but not rich, naval officer, Captain Wentworth, proposed and she fell in love with him at 19. But Anne's deceased mother's friend, Lady Russell, persuaded Anne not to make the match. Up until the time of the story, Anne hasn't had another suitor and she's now well past the usual age of marriage at 29 and "her bloom had vanish early." Her father's spendthrift ways mean that Anne could bring little money to a marriage so she's expecting not to marry.

While in her social class that lack of a husband is a drawback, in reality her family is a greater problem. Her father, Sir Walter Elliot, is a baronet who spends too much money, is obsessed by social rank, loves to be around the "beautiful people" and admire himself in a mirror, and keeps company with an unsuitable, scheming widow, Mrs. Clay, who is looking for a husband and has latched onto Elizabeth as friend. Anne's older sister, Elizabeth, is also unmarried and is as equally obsessed with social status as their father. Both Sir Walter and Elizabeth fail to value Anne and looked to her to suit their conveniences. The other daughter, Mary, is married but the connection doesn't thrill either Sir Walter or Elizabeth. Mary sees Anne as a virtual servant who should wait on her every beck and call when Anne is her guest.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By K. A. Stevenson on May 28 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Over the years, I have read "Persuasion" by Jane Austen at LEAST 10 times. Simply put, it is my favorite book. While not everyone holds this novel with the same high esteem that I do, I urge those who have NOT read "Persuasion" to buy it.
This book has meant different things to me at different times in my life. I have often reflected why I find the story so fascinating and believe it is because it so accurately portrays the human spirit and exposes our flaws and strengths with such transparency.
Jane Austen reveals those who are so superficial that they see no goodness or worth other than beauty and wealth (Anne's father and sister); those who are so dependent that they do not listen to their own heart - but instead leave their most important decisions for others to make (Anne herself); and those whose pride has been wounded.
And perhaps what is so captivating, Austen lets the reader vicariously "undo" an error in judgment. This is an excellent and timeless novel.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ganime B. Akin on Aug. 18 2003
Format: Paperback
As an avid fan of Jane Austen, I began reading "Persuasion" with great expectations. Although I cannot say I am dissapointed, I must admit I did not like Persuasion as much as Pride and Prejudice or Sense and Sensibility.
First of all, although I sympathized with Anne when he was slighted by her own family and she was taken no notice of in the company of foolish women just because she is not as pretty and "fragile" as them, maybe because she is not as strong and passionate a character as Elizabeth Bennet in Pride and Prejudice, I could not particularly attach myself to her. Still, I read the novel from beginning to the end in a very short time because it has more than enough to keep our interest. Especially the character of Mrs. Croft, the sister of Captain Wentworth is worth notice; because among the "ailing" and "fatigued" women of the higher classes of that time, this woman who walks long distances with her husband, who accompanies him on long sea journeys and takes the reins of their carriage to manoeuvre out of the way of a post is very interesting. In this novel, Jane Austen says quiet a lot of things which can be thought quiet feministic. Well she says similar things in P&P, for example she makes Darcy say that Elizabeth's complexion is greatly improved after a long walk, when Bingley's sisters criticize her for such an unlady-like behaviour.
Another thing about the novel is that we don't really know the feelings of Captain Wentworth. It is true that the letter he writes to Anne at the end is full of love but I didn't feel his passion as I did Darcy's when he proposed to Elizabeth the first time.
All in all, I recommend the book to readers who have read Austen's other novels. But as a first read it may not be so enjoyable as Pride and Prejudice or Sense and Sensibility.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Feb. 22 2008
Format: Paperback
Persuasion is Jane Austen's most sophisticated story and writing. She lovingly and incisively demonstrates the problems of being a well-bred sensitive person in a society that's more intrigued by social standing, money, and polite conversation than by good character.

Persuasion is Anne Elliot's story. The title's initial allusion is to Anne's brush with matrimony when a promising, but not rich, naval officer, Captain Wentworth, proposed and she fell in love with him at 19. But Anne's deceased mother's friend, Lady Russell, persuaded Anne not to make the match. Up until the time of the story, Anne hasn't had another suitor and she's now well past the usual age of marriage at 29 and "her bloom had vanish early." Her father's spendthrift ways mean that Anne could bring little money to a marriage so she's expecting not to marry.

While in her social class that lack of a husband is a drawback, in reality her family is a greater problem. Her father, Sir Walter Elliot, is a baronet who spends too much money, is obsessed by social rank, loves to be around the "beautiful people" and admire himself in a mirror, and keeps company with an unsuitable, scheming widow, Mrs. Clay, who is looking for a husband and has latched onto Elizabeth as friend. Anne's older sister, Elizabeth, is also unmarried and is as equally obsessed with social status as their father. Both Sir Walter and Elizabeth fail to value Anne and looked to her to suit their conveniences. The other daughter, Mary, is married but the connection doesn't thrill either Sir Walter or Elizabeth. Mary sees Anne as a virtual servant who should wait on her every beck and call when Anne is her guest.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most recent customer reviews



Feedback