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Pet Sematary Mass Market Paperback – Nov 1 1984


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Mass Market Paperback, Nov 1 1984
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 1 pages
  • Publisher: Signet (Nov. 1 1984)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451132378
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451132376
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 2.5 x 12.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 249 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (291 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,457,850 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

From Amazon

Renowned for its superior productions, BBC radio may have outdone itself by adapting Stephen King's Pet Sematary to audio. A clamorous cacophony of talking, whining, whistling, and howling, Pet Sematary is a quick, entertaining earful for those who don't have other auditory distractions to contend with, such as a car full of talking whining, whistling, howling children. However, the melodramatic prose marries well with the acting; such is the case when one reader--whose voice bears an uncanny resemblance to Kramer's from Seinfeld--tells another about the effects of the Pet Sematary: "Heroin makes junkies feel good when they put it in their arms, but all the time it's poisoning their mind and body--this place can be like that and don't you ever forget it!" (Running time: three hours, two cassettes) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

In this BBC dramatization of King's (Wizard and Glass, Audio Reviews, LJ 2/15/98) 1983 best seller, Dr. Louis Creed moves his ideal family from congested, urban Chicago to the rural simplicity of Ludlow, ME. His property sits near a long-established pet burial ground and a mysterious Indian burial ground from which the dead can be raised. The program effectively draws us into the characters' world: marriage and family, then shock, grief and madness as we explore the nature and mystery of death. Presenting a multivoiced dramatization rather than a reading of the novel, the actors work together, with added music and sound effects, to create King's macabre world. Recommended.?Kristen L. Smith, Loras Coll. Lib., Dubuque, IA
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
Different people have different ideas about what is "funny" - same with "scary". If snakes or spiders or great-white sharks scare the peedoodle out of you, then your reaction to a story about them might be different than it might be for, say The Crocodile Hunter.
Stephen King is prolific beyond belief. He is sometimes redundant. In Pet Sematary he wrote a story so compelling that I literally could not put it down, yet at the same time so horrifying that I practically screamed at myself NOT TO TURN THE NEXT PAGE!!!!
King knows a thing or two about humans and human relationships, and in Pet Sematary he creates a realistic family that you care about.... then he does absolutely TERRIFYING things to them. Without giving anything away - I have to say that one of the reasons that this book affected me so deeply is that I had recently become a Dad back when this book first was released, and this book hones in on a new parent's worst nightmares, then just gets worse and worse and worse.
If you like being scared by a book, and you can't think of anything worse than seeing your child killed - this book might hit you like it hit me. I repeat: This is the scariest novel I have ever read.
As an aside: The "scariest book ever" was turned into a fairly cheesy movie. I give the book a solid 5 stars, but wouldn't rate the film any higher than 2 or 3. Another aside: My personal choice for "scariest movie" is "The Exorcist", while I found the novel of "The Exorcist" fairly bland and not paced well enough to scare me.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
(...)P>Others have commented on the fact that this novel borrows much from The Monkey's Paw. The idea of the Mic Mac burial ground is interesting, particularly the shadowy presence of the Wendigo, but growing up in New England as he did, it's difficult to determine just how much of the concept of Pet Cemetary was inspired, and how much was simply King putting a new coat of paint on an old short story with the obligatory childhood horrors, family mundanities, and heavy-handed foreshadowing thrown in for good measure.
There were some interesting moments and ideas in this book, but few of them were realized, and what little was of interest was buried in 100 to 200 unnecessary pages of foreshadowing (someone's gonna get run over, we GET it!) and the obligatory King tales of childhood suffering. Top it off with a disappointing and (IMO) downright irritating ending (hmmmm, dead cat and kid are evil, let's repeat this mistake shall we?) and this is an annoying snoozer.
Far too much build-up for no payoff.
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By Aguagon on July 1 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
If you look at the critical acclaim pages of nearly any Stephen King book, you will find that a vast number of sources probably proclaimed the work "Sheer Genius!" "Gripping and Terrifying" and, more often than not, "One of the Scariest Books I'd Ever Read". Ordinarily, I think it fair to say these claims are exaggerations--but not in the case of Pet Sematary.
I've read a good deal of Stephen King's novels (more than half of them), and this one is by far my favorite. It has parts that you wouldn't want to read home alone late at night, but it is far more interesting than just monsters jumping out of shadows...
What made this book so terrifying for me was that it was about human nature, and human reaction to death. The main character in the novel, Louis Creed, unleashes horrors into the world trying to ressurect his dead loved ones...and after the horrors are dealt with, he does it again. Pet Sematary is a deeply emotional book that explores just how far we would be willing to go to cheat death.
If you read just one Stephen King novel, make it this one.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Stephen King, bestselling author of all time (just ask the Guiness Book of World Records), has brought forth another creepy novel. If I could sum up what King is trying to tell his audience, I could do it in few words.
Don't intervene with fate.
Louis Creed's interventions with fate basically screw him over in a major way (more on that later). He's a doctor, so you're thinking, "Great salary." He's got a gorgeous wife and two children, a young girl and a baby boy. And he's decided that Bangor, Maine, definitely beats the city of Chicago, so he and his family move on out into a more rural and placid type environment. The Bangor local is also no problem when it comes to work - he shall take a job working at the medical university (FYI: King now resides in Bangor with his wife, Tabitha, and his children).
When the Creeds first move to Maine, all seems well. Louis meets Jud Crandall, an elderly 80-something gentleman with a heart of gold. Their relationship quickly evolves and the two men become very close. Jud helps Louis grieve when his baby son is hit and killed by a truck on the road by their house.
Enter the "pet sematary" from which the novel's title is derived. A group of children were not educated in the fundamentals of spelling, hence the errors. They buried roadkill and various dead pets over what was once supposedly an Indian burial ground.
Grieving to the brink of insanity, Louis is willing to try and bring his baby boy back to life using the pet "sematary." After all, it worked for the family cat, who ended up roadkill prior to the death of Louis' son. Despite the fact that one of his dead patients keeps appearing to him, telling him not to go through it, Louis is overcome with grief and refuses to listen to him.
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