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Peter Gabriel [4] (Security) (Vinyl) Import


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Product Details

  • LP Record (June 24 2003)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Classic Records
  • ASIN: B0000A0DUZ
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)

Product Description

Product Description

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After three eponymous discs noteworthy for their thematic richness and musical experimentation, Peter Gabriel yielded to conventional wisdom by actually titling this 1982 successor. In every other respect, however, Security was another stride beyond the progressive rock terrain Gabriel had explored from Genesis forward. Most crucially, he goes deeper into the heart of world music, and further investigates the African sources first invoked on the prior album's magisterial track, "Biko." Security is steeped in polyrhythms, sculpted with synthesizers, and detailed with percussive textures set to a low boil beneath Gabriel's yearning vocals. Its themes of transcendence and identity, and contrasts of modern isolation with primordial community, reverberate through "Lay Your Hands On Me," "I Have the Touch," "The Rhythm of the Heat," and "San Jacinto." And in "Shock the Monkey," the set's initial hit, Gabriel portentously stands dance rhythms on their head in a troubling, funny riff on the mammal within. --Sam Sutherland --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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By Tim Brough on July 19 2004
Format: Audio CD
I loved Peter Gabriel's third album, but it is a primarily English affair, even with the hints of African rhythms that began to creep in around the edges. When it came time to make his fourth album, Gabriel decided to take strides into areas outside his island, and the resulting album (and first to bear a proper title), "Security," was rich with African, Native American and other worldly influences. Not only were the sounds more internationalist, so were the characters involved. From the American Indian who's sadness at seeing his culture dissolve into trivialities like the "Sit'n Bull Steakhouse" to the tribal marriage in "The Family and The Fishing Net," these are people more real than anyone Gabriel had imagined on any of his other recordings. And they certainly did not sound like they were taking tea on the row.
The sound of "Security" influenced many to come. The newly reformed King Crimson and the Talking Heads were dabbling in this style of music, and it was still four years before Paul Simon would make "Graceland." It is easy to say that PG3 had as much to do with these musicians' sounds as "Security" did, but it was Gabriel's "Shock The Monkey" that wedged the tribal sounds onto MTV and out from under the novelty aspect. (Adam Ant anyone?) Also, "Security" is easily the first album that carried the term "world music" out and into the general public. Even a band as innocuous as Starship wound up quoting from "Security": their "Connection" from "Nuclear Furniture" lyrically references "I Have The Touch." (There's a line about needing "Peter Gabriel like contact.
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Format: Audio CD
Peter Gabriel's 1982 opus entitled "Security" picks right up where his 1980 self-titled third album left off but at the same time is another great leap forward from his previous outings.
Somewhat brighter in mood, Less monochromic and more accessible in sound, "Security" is arguably one of his greatest, most innovative, and most important work of art of his entire solo career. At the same time parts of this album are every bit as dark and spooky as his third album is. Having been one of my favorite albums of his career, I decided to replace the older CD editions with the then newly re-issued remasters and "Security" was the first one I got and HOLY GOOD NIGHT! This album is unbelievably intense and loud!
"Rhythm Of The Heat" scared the daylights out of me when I first heard it many years ago on a train during a thunderstorm. The song begins with the sound of an industrial machine sound effect and with Gabriel's distant wail a very ominous melody comes in and the song will take you to dark but amazing places. The song becomes very tribal and very intense, not to mention scary as h.e.l.l. Everything rises to a critically high-intensity with the last minute with the songs beat rising to a very fast pace and menacing sound that has been unrivalled by almost anything I've ever heard before. Must I say this song is much more intense and more earth-shaking than any heavy metal song can even dream to be. If there's any song on this album that really had it's power multiplied, it's "Rhythm of The Heat". Be very careful not the crack or shatter the windows nearby.
A couple of these songs are very deep and sometimes even a bit heartbreaking especially nowadays with a harsh social and political climate.
"San Jacinto" is the most bizarre track on this album.
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Format: Audio CD
if you've never heard this album, there's not much i'm going to say to try to convince you to. this review is, instead, for those of us who are long-time fans of this master songwriter/performer. the re-mastering is impeccable. some new photos. i have two major complaints:
1. there is plenty of room on a cd these days...room for maybe 20 seconds of silence followed by a bonus track or two. i'm not sure how many singles were released for this album but i know of at least one track [soft dog] that would have been a perfect 'gift' to us dedicated fans who have probably already paid full price for this album once or twice before.
2. it would have been nice to have some liner notes by the man himself...describing ideas for the songs, emotions in the studio, etc.
i hope one day for a comprehensive 3 or 4 disc box set of alternate takes, rare stuff & remixes of PG. if you look at the date this review was posted, you may draw the conclusion that i have been pussyfooting. why would a hard-core PG fan wait until now to buy the same album, remastered? well, i guess like most people, i have to work hard for the money i make and there is very little 'extra' to offer here aside from the improved sound quality. at some point i would like to shed my current PG collection with the newly remastered editions. if there had been bonus tracks on each, i would have all of them by now...instead, i think i'll take my time - maybe try to find 'em used.
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Format: Audio CD
This is a really good recording. I'd rank it third behind his first and third solo albums [neither of these have names]. Back when MTV actually showed music videos "Shock the Monkey" blew away just about every other video on the planet (the song fit the video perfectly, too), and as I recall it won video of the year.
Musically, I'd call Security more "sensual" and "warm" than his previous solo works. Which is fine, if different. His third, "melting face" solo album has a distinctly "punk" feel to it (though it should not be confused with punk, Gabriel will never be mistaken for Joe Strummer, for example).
The real problem with Security is that it marks the beginning of a downward slope for Gabriel as an artist. Firstly, the album is short. Only eight songs? That's not an LP, it's a glorified EP (for those of you who still understand these terms in an MP3 world <laugh>). Secondly, in Security we have the first indications that Gabrial has run out of ideas. "Wallflower" is little more than an extension of "Lead a Normal Life" on his third solo album (and not half as frightening), and he would then finally exhaust the theme on yet another, still weaker, song on his next album, So. It is sad how great artists reach a point where all that is left is parody/self-parody. He hasn't reached it quite yet with Security, this is still very good stuff. But the decline will emerge full-blown four years later with So, and I haven't bought a Gabriel recording since then (though I have seen a few new videos, and nothing about them has changed my mind).
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