Peter Gzowski: A Biography and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
  • List Price: CDN$ 44.66
  • You Save: CDN$ 15.91 (36%)
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Peter Gzowski has been added to your Cart
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by B-Line Books
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Dundurn; 2010; First Edition; 9 X 6.10 X 1.60 inches; Hardcover; Near Fine in Fine dust jacket; About new book but for light smudge to foreedge; in glossy dust jacket; tight square and unmarked.; 496 Pages
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Peter Gzowski Hardcover – Aug 16 2010


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 28.75
CDN$ 21.22 CDN$ 6.30

Best Canadian Books of 2014
Stone Mattress is our #1 Canadian pick for 2014. See all


Product Details

  • Hardcover: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Dundurn Press; Canadian First edition (Aug. 16 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1554887208
  • ISBN-13: 978-1554887200
  • Product Dimensions: 16.3 x 3.8 x 23.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 953 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #243,262 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Quill & Quire

It’s unlikely anyone was clamouring for an exhaustive Peter Gzowski biography. In the 13 years since the CBC Radio mainstay stepped away from his most prominent perch as host of Morningside, and in the eight years since his death, Gzowski’s profile and fame, like that of many prominent and beloved broadcasters, has receded. Nevertheless, R.B. Fleming has taken on the task, though the result is not likely to win over many skeptics.

Fleming’s book exhaustively details Gzowski’s youth, his years as a print journalist experimenting with the emerging forms of “new journalism,” his various pre-Morningside CBC projects (most notably his late-night TV talk show, 90 Minutes Live), and his often dark and tumultuous personal and family life.

At times, the book gets tedious. Fleming provides an overly extensive account of articles Gzowski wrote for publications like Maclean’s and the Toronto Star. Fleming also repeatedly points out Gzowski’s tendency to embellish personal anecdotes, which results in a biographer constantly questioning his subject’s honesty.

On the plus side, one of the book’s strengths is its portrayal of the group of largely Toronto-based writers and broadcasters in whose circles Gzowski travelled and who helped shape Canadian pop culture. However, while Fleming repeatedly notes how popular Gzowski, and especially Morningside, was with a fairly diverse swath of Canadians, he has little to say about its lasting influence on the culture it sought to support or, for that matter, the cultural value of the show itself.

One of the side effects of Fleming’s biography is to bring into focus the changes that have taken place at CBC Radio and in Canadian culture in the past 15 years. In hindsight, maybe Gzowski’s frequent chats with W.O. Mitchell about life on the Prairies are as ephemeral and ultimately empty as e­Talk’s “exclusive” reports from the set of CTV’s latest generic police procedural. There’s a reason why all that’s left of the version of Canadian culture represented by the Gzowski-era CBC and fellow cultural nationalists is kitschy, overpriced T-shirts and bags targeted at people who can barely remember the pre-Ghomeshi CBC.

Review

Complicated is too anodyne a word to describe the Peter Gzowski who emerges from Flemings pages. But on radio he was magic. The medium freed him from all the dark corners of his private self -- and made him free as the birds he imagined the Galt skaters of his boyhood to have been -- and through it he connected with the emotions and imaginations of Canadians to an extend few others have.

Having greatly enjoyed my friendship with him for four decades, I still sometimes brood over his contradictions. He was like an absorbing character in fiction whom the author never quite explains. Fleming is a long-time admirer of Gzowski the broadcaster but doesn't let that suppress what he's learned about Gzowski the man. I can't say more for Fleming than that he's made me think freshly about a subject I believed I knew well. He's given us an absorbing, provocative book about a man who was even more complicated than most of us imagined. (Robert Fulford)

Through the book Fleming returns often to what he sees as Gzowski's habit of adjusting facts to suit the story he's telling. A charitable view is that he was exploring the creative non-fiction "New Journalism" of Tom Wolfe and George Plimpton. More cynically, Fleming sees Gzowski shoring up his insecurity by regularly fabricating and altering details of his life: from where he skated as a kid, to his mother's education, to his parents relationship, to where he went to summer camp.

The enduring value of Flemings book is the saga of a very imperfect man who told stories, and a reminder of just how magical radio can be when its creators are willing to slave in the service of work that serves and unites its community by entertaining it.

One of the books strengths is its portrayal of the group of largely Toronto-based writers and broadcasters in whose circles Gzowski traveled and who helped shape Canadian pop culture.

My memory of Peter Gzowski remains so evocative and so poignant that while reading R.B. Flemings magnificent Peter Gzowski: A Biography I realized it is not just the story of a life but the saga of a generation The value of this book is the portrait it paints of its protagonist away from his microphone. Gzowski emerges not nearly as likable as he wanted us to believe, but the revelations of his dark side serve mainly to make him more human. (Peter C. Newman)

Last years triumphant biographies of two great Canadians R.B. Flemings Peter Gzowski: A Biography, and Charles Forans Mordecai: The Life and Timesrestored our faith in a form often too degraded into the literary equivalent of Jersey Shore.

Fleming's biography of Gzowski is nuanced and remarkably well-assembled. It gathers the disparate strands of the broadcaster's chequered life into a coherent and fascinating view of a clever, complex personality who, despite emotional problems, kept a country intrigued for almost twenty years.

As one of my editors at Maclean’s, he was often as vain, prickly, sneering and verbally sadistic as Fleming goes to such extraordinary lengths to prove he could be, but he was also funny, joyful, supremely well read and bursting with opinions and gossip about hot magazines and their writers.

Peter Gzowski was human, sometimes difficult and not always the nicest of people. Sounds like all of us, eh?

Fleming had to fall back on his historical training to find ways to verify stories, Fleming knows, however, that with a public figure, gossip helps historians see how issues were presented or understood. It may be that readers will be selective in what they decide to believe about Gzowski, but this book will have a long shelf life because it tries to understand all aspects of Gzowski’s life, both public and private.

Born in 1934, Peter Gzowski covered most of the last half of the century as a journalist and interviewer. This biography, the most comprehensive and definitive yet published, is also a portrait of Canada during those decades, beginning with Gzowski's days at the University of Toronto's The Varsity in the mid 1950s, through his years as the youngest-ever managing editor of Maclean's in the 1960s and his tremendous success on CBC's Morningside in the 1980s and 1990s, and ending with his stint as a Globe and Mail columnist at the dawn of the 21st century and his death in January 2002.

Gzowski saw eight Canadian Prime Ministers in office, most of whom he interviewed, and witnessed everything from the Quiet Revolution in Québec to the growth of economic nationalism in Canada's West. From the rise of state medicine to the decline of the patriarchy, Peter was there to comment, to resist, and to participate. Here was a man who was proud to call himself Canadian and who made millions of other Canadians realize that Canada was, in what he claimed was a Canadian expression, not a bad place to live.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was recovering from heart surgery when my wife came into the hospital room and told me that Peter Gzowski had died. I started to sob. And hour later the wife of the man in the next bed came in and told him that Peter Gsowski had died. He started to sob. His influence on the Canada of his day was profound. We all thought we knew him. This is a readable and well researched biography of an extraordinary man. It could be called "Life and Times" for the extent to which it covers his work. It works well to portray him as a human and flawed individual. However, it strangely does a much better job of portraying his childhood family - mother in particular - than his wife, children, partners and lovers. In fact, the portrait of his secret lover and the child of that union in the final chapter is better covered than his wife and children. This book is worth the read though like the subject it is an imperfect creation.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Paul on Oct. 26 2010
Format: Hardcover
Rae Fleming manages to write with clarity about Peter Gzowski, a titan of Canadian journalism and radio, and his archival research has been prodigious. He appears to have read every article (no matter how insignificant), watched every TV special (no matter how cringe-inducing), and listened to every radio program (almost all of which were flawless) that Gzowski was ever involved with. And he has unearthed something previously unknown about Gzowski's personal life: In the 1960s, married with children, Gzowski fathered a child with another woman.

But here is where the problems begin. Rather than integrate the story of Gzowski's illegitimate son into the general biographical narrative, Fleming sequesters it in a separate, final chapter. In doing so, of course, he created the journalistic splash he was aiming for. But he also manages to draw attention to how devoid of personal insight the rest of his book is.

Consider: In the larger sweep of Gzowski's life, the story of his secret child has little significance. Gzowski remained friends with the boy's mother and supported her, yet he rarely saw the child as a boy, and never visited his grandchild later. But in areas that dominated Gzowski's life, Fleming is virtually silent. Gzowski's first wife, Jennie Lissaman, is little more than a shadow in Fleming's book, her presence reduced to the woman who bore Gzowski's children and cooked his meals. There is little description of what Peter might have found attractive about her, what they might have found in common, how tensions arose in their relationship, why they divorced when they did. While Gzowski's illegitimate child gets an entire chapter, his five children from Jennie are barely mentioned. Some get no more description than a listing of their names and the year they were born.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ian Gordon Malcomson HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on Sept. 27 2010
Format: Hardcover
Few biographies go to such lengths as Fleming's study of the late Peter Gzowski does in recording the good and bad in the main characters' lives in an attempt to understand their personality. The obvious risk in offering such a complete view is that the writer might be accused of destroying personal reputations without justifiable cause; the reward, however, might be to provide some much needed insight as to how unique individuals are able to overcome significant shortcomings to realize lasting distinction. The much fabled and checkered life of Peter Gzowski, Canadian journalist and broadcaster, is one such example of how singular achievement can be honored by turning the spotlight on both exceptional ability and personal failings. To understand how Gzowski got to where he did as a framer of modern Canadian culture, the reader can't appreciate the impact of successes without considering the many failures. Here are some of my observations as to why this biography makes for an incredible read in respect to what it says about Gzowski the man and Gzowski the legend. Meld the two views, as it is effectively done in this book, and you come out with a well-rounded figure who has risen to the top in spite of his many tragic flaws. Fleming serves up a spicy dish of facts and personal recollections about how Gzowski entered the world of Canadian culture through an early interest in journalism and theatre. He certainly had the talent for the dramatic when it came to colorfully articulating his views on a wide range of national and regional issues. From his early days, there was every indication that Gzowski was willing to exaggerate his accomplishments in order to impress others as to his command of a situation.Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is one of the most truthful biographies in recent years. Without diminishing the stellar reputation of one of Canada's best broadcaster ever, the book shows how the dark, tortured inner self helped to make Gzowski the superb communicator that he was.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
Life and Times Oct. 6 2014
By Richard Schwindt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
I was recovering from heart surgery when my wife came into the hospital room and told me that Peter Gzowski had died. I started to sob. And hour later the wife of the man in the next bed came in and told him that Peter Gsowski had died. He started to sob. His influence on the Canada of his day was profound. We all thought we knew him. This is a readable and well researched biography of an extraordinary man. It could be called "Life and Times" for the extent to which it covers his work. It works well to portray him as a human and flawed individual. However, it strangely does a much better job of portraying his childhood family - mother in particular - than his wife, children, partners and lovers. In fact, the portrait of his secret lover and the child of that union in the final chapter is better covered than his wife and children. This book is worth the read though like the subject it is an imperfect creation.
I'm saying this because I have not seen a single Canadian review of this outstanding and fantastic book. Not only is the book a Oct. 19 2014
By Gunnar Gunnarsson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Fleming's biography of Peters Gzowski is a must read for all Canadians. I'm saying this because I have not seen a single Canadian review of this outstanding and fantastic book.
Not only is the book a convincing and thorough journey through Peter's life, it also gives us a taste of Canada as a country for the decades it enjoyed the career of one of its outstanding journalist, author and host of the airwaves, the iconic Peter Gzowski.
I listened to him whenever I had the chance. You can almost hear the familiar voice come through in this splendid book. Go read it. It's Canada at its best. He was the best.


Feedback