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Piano Concerto No.1 Import


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Product Details

  • Performer: Gould; Bernstein
  • Composer: Bernstein; Brahms
  • Audio CD (Oct. 18 2006)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Sme
  • ASIN: B00000C28M
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

1. 'Don't Be Frightened. Mr. Gould Is Here....'
2. Concerto For Piano And Orchestra No. 1 In D Minor, Op. 15: Maestoso
3. Concerto For Piano And Orchestra No. 1 In D Minor, Op. 15: Adagio
4. Concerto For Piano And Orchestra No. 1 In D Minor, Op. 15: Rondo. Allegro non troppo
5. Excerpt Of New York Philharmonic Intermission Radio Interview

Product Description

Product Description

The circumstances surrounding this April 6, 1962 concert at Carnegie Hall are as legendary as the performance itself. Pianist Gould desired to play the piece at a slower-than-usual tempo, Bernstein (who was conducting the New York Philharmonic) did not. Gould prevailed, but Bernstein shared his disavowal in an infamous pre-concert speech to the audience. This CD-the concert recording's first authorized release-includes Bernstein's speech, the complete performance and a revealing Glen Gould interview recorded two years later.

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Newly remastered from a Voice of America mono off-line aircheck, one hears more detail and ambiance here than in previous reissues of this controversial performance taped live at Carnegie Hall April 6th, 1962. The conductor's infamous "disclaimer" disassociating himself from Glenn Gould's slow tempi is preserved along with a snippet from an interview in which Gould defends both his interpretation and Bernstein's actions. The first movement starts slow, but insidiously speeds up to a tempo not far from the norm. Flickering in and out of Bernstein's turgid orchestral backdrop, Gould downplays the music's fiery intensity, seeking to emphasize its meditative qualities and contrapuntal implications. If Sony wanted to issue a Gould Brahms D- Minor, why not the more incisive, and far better-engineered October 1962 Baltimore version? --Jed Distler

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By Bernie Koenig TOP 500 REVIEWER on Dec 27 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I have long been a Glenn Gould fan. I find that he approached performing from a compositional standpoint. By that I mean he looked at the score from the standpoint of what he thought the composer wanted, rather by thinking how he would play it as a soloist.

He is one of the few people who can play Bach on the piano and make it sound like Baroque music. Too many pianists play Bach way too broadly.

I must admit to not being a fan of the music of Brahms. Indeed, I am not a big fan of the 19th century in general. My record collection goes from Bach and Beethoven to Mahler and Schoenberg to Carter and Cage. Plus post bop jazz.

Lately I have been trying to listen more to the 19th century and I have found that by looking at the performers I like in other periods, I have been able to find interesting recordings of 19th century music. I really enjoy Gould doing Brahms' chamber music.

So, straight from the Toronto Symphony's Glenn Gould 75th Birthday concert, in which this piece was mentioned, I bought it and listened to it, and liked it.

Gould merges the piano more with the orchestra rather than contrasting it so the piano is played more softly, as is the orchestra, making the performance more moody and mysterious rather than bombastic and overly romantic.

The comments by Bernstein at the beginning, and excepts from an interview with Gould at the end nicely sandwich the performance, which, judging by the applause, the audience also loved.
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By carminaburana TOP 500 REVIEWER on Aug. 1 2008
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I waited for this cd, quite long time. I love Brahms, Bernstein, and Gould.
So, I was quite interested in Gould interpretation. The performance is exquisite, but I didn't like the way the remastering was made. I prefer life concerts, but this one looks as if it was recorded in a hospital, in the TB department. Coughing all the time was annoying. And the sound was not polished, looking like an old recording.It is true that it happened quite a long time ago. For this reason I dropped down one star. Other than that, the pianist is a virtuoso, the orchestra looks flawless...and you also benefit of the conductor's speech from the beginning, and a short interview with Glenn.
What can I say, I would recomend this CD only if you are a real fan of GLENN or BERNSTEIN.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 31 reviews
36 of 40 people found the following review helpful
CD with historical importance Dec 8 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
After seeming some of the more tepid reviews of this CD, I felt obliged to come to its defense. The historical value of this CD alone merits 5 stars. Bernstein's speech in the beginning is very interesting (although I'm not a Bernstein fan) and the portion of an interview at the end with Glenn Gould (and I'm a big Gould fan)is also very interesting. In between was what I thought was a great performance of Brahms by two outstanding musicians. The sound quality is understandably not up to 21st century levels, but it pretty good by mid-20th century technological standards. According to the excellent linear notes that comes with this CD, Bernstein may have been strongly influenced by Gould's interpretation of Brahms. It seems Glenn had the last laugh!
34 of 39 people found the following review helpful
Eccentric? Perhaps, but so what? Nov. 26 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I bought this disc because of Bernstein's famous speech and to hear just what was so bad about what Gould had done. I had never liked Brahms First Concerto before, despite being very favorably disposed toward Brahms in general and his Second Concerto in particular. I had listened to at least three different recordings before discovering this one, and lo and behold, upon hearing it the piece made sense to me for the first time. What more can I say?
18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
Mainly for historical reasons April 7 2006
By CD Maniac - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Love it or hate it, the main reason for the release is for historical reasons. The performance, and especially Bernstein's pre-performance remarks, caused a huge controversy in the press, and the story has been relayed ever since.

This recoding, and the excellent liner notes, correct a lot of misconceptions: Gould was in favor of Bernstein's remarks; Gould's interpretation is no longer considered exceptionally slow by today's standards (meaning the Gould must have had some effect on a few of today's artists). It is fascinating to hear what all the commotion was about.

The most interesting part is that the critics fared the worst in the judgement of time: the critic from the New York Times absolutely seems ridiculous (in his review that was written in the form of a letter to an imaginary friend!) with his snide remarks that come off as a cranky senior citizen criticizing the youngsters on the stage. And the fact that so many other newspapers picked up the story as if it was a boxing match.

Reagrdless of recording quality (originally meant to be a mono radio broadcast), this is a fascinating performance that documents a very interesting concert in the history of an American conductor and orchesetra, and deserves this wide release. It shouldn't be the only recording of this Brahms concerto you should have, but it should sit right next to it.
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
A necessary addition to any Glenn Gould collection. Jan. 27 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Not as outrageously slow paced as expected, the actual recording is a bit of an anti-climax when one considers the mythology that has surrounded this controversial recording. Bernstein's (included) disclaimer is as much complimentary as it is critical and is certainly a fine example of his erudition. Audience coughing impedes listening enjoyment considerably, but there is a great sense of musical sincerity in GG's rendering with a not totally unsympathetic orchestra and conductor. Not in the league of Gilels' or Zimmerman's recordings, but definitely worthy of space on a serious collectors shelf.
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Give me a break, guys May 20 2000
By cindy stavenhagen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Mr Gould's recording offers something that is hard to come by in the world of Brahms: he understands the music.
Mr Gould, trained in the Bachian methods of counterpoint, saw far more music in this piece than any of you ever will. He even broke some of the traditional rules to try and prove his point. He deliberately alters tempo and dynamics to try and show us the beauty of brahms, in his hidden melodies and complex structures. Unfortunately his efforts were wasted. The masses of "classical music lovers" failed to see what he wanted them to. They thought he was just being difficult, because he wouldn't toss this piece over his shoulder as a means of displaying his virtuosity, as so many artists do. It just goes to show, that you can't trust the public with something as beautifully complex, musically speaking, as Brahms.
I'm sorry for all of you. Mr Gould was one of the greatest gifts to the world of music.


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