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Piano Lessons: Music, Love, and True Adventures Paperback – Mar 10 1997


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Delta; Reprint edition (March 10 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385318219
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385318211
  • Product Dimensions: 21 x 13 x 1.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 181 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #376,235 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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By kyara on July 11 2003
Format: Paperback
Since I'm in my forties and just bought a digital piano to learn and play music for the first time in my life, I thought it would be interesting to read this book for some tips and inspiration. I did, however, find it quite difficult to get into. Perhaps this is partly because I am not American and also because I don't know much about either the places the author mentions or most of the names he drops. But I persevered, and am glad I did, because although I didn't get what I expected I did enjoy reading about the experiences of going to a music camp and the authors encounters, conversations and interviews with various amateur and professional musicians. These were the best part for me, and especially to explore what making music means.
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By Amy on Dec 6 2002
Format: Paperback
An awful book. A preening book. A silly & self-satisfied book.
Adams spends most of it avoiding his piano; attending twee
little piano workshops, fussing with some witless computer
piano lessons, buying a boat with a literary pedigree (E.B.
White!), wondering about those drab people in malls who
wear bright white sneakers & lack boats with a literary
pedigree, and piddling on with his busy life. Meanwhile,
his Steinway sits there! Hey, Noah Adams, if you don't have
the time to put it to use, send me the piano! And throw in
the bench, too! Also, whoever wrote "die yuppie scum", c'mon over and we'll have a sing-along! Everybody else, read "Men, Women & Pianos" by Arthur Loesser for its wit and depth,even if it is way out of date. Or "The Piano Shop
on the Left Bank" by Thad Carhart, a short book that's like
pornography for piano lovers.
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Format: Paperback
I was interested in reading the book becasue I recently returned to playing the piano after 30 years and I thought it would be fun to read someone else's experience on the trials and tribulations learning or relearning the music and buying a piano. Unfortunately, Mr. Adam's short reminisecne was short on information about actual playing and such and more about his very busy life with NPR. His book also suffers from "name dropitis" and a sometimes an elitist tone. Passages about "overfed" mall shoppers in "stonewashed" jeans -- followed by the author's refuge to an organic juice bar was plebian writing. I was most appalled by the fact that Mr. Adams purchases an incredibly expensive piano before even being able to read music! I found his struggle and his inability to "get going" and play very inaccessible to me as reader.
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By Bron Mitchell on April 28 2002
Format: Paperback
I am confused and disappointed by other reviews of this book that claim Noah Adams went about learning the piano all wrong. Readers who were hoping for hints about practice and technique have missed out on a thoroughly good read, all because of their misguided approach to this wonderful story of one man's musical quest. This is not a "how to" book, and nor should it be.
What makes this book such a treasure is the exact same thing as what one reviewer callously calls "banal fluff": talking about his wife, his love for a piece of music that he longs to play but fears he can't, his experiences of meeting and talking with other musicians, his knowledge of pianos and of music in general, and his passion and appreciation for music of many styles. The process of learning a musical instrument is a journey, and Noah tells us of his. From the first chapter, when he talks of the secret desire he has held for years to buy a piano, to the last chord of Schumann's 'Träumerei' which he plays as a Christmas present for his wife, this book entranced me with the joys and the struggles of learning to play an instrument. Yes, he may have got there faster if he'd spent more time practicing and less time procrastinating, but chances are the results would have been far less rewarding, and the book would certainly have been far less interesting.
Ultimately, if you genuinely have a passion for music, there is no right or wrong way to go about learning. Noah did it this way, and he got there in the end. Who are we to criticise?
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Format: Paperback
Noah Adams has captured the soul of learning to play the piano, and in so doing has answered his own question: Why does a fifty-one-year-old man suddenly decide he has to have a piano?
Once you learn to play Robert Schumann's devastatingly beautiful "Traumerei" or "Of Foreign Lands and People" you cannot bear not to play.
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Format: Paperback
mr. adams book was a sad disappointment to this adult beginner piano player. his chapters follow the calendar year beginning with the purchase of an expensive piano. for the next 9 months he tries to learn with a computer program and audio tapes and by interviewing pianists and piano makers. perhaps he thought the latter would transmit their skills by osmosis. i wondered after finishing the book if adams, as a successful broadcast journalist, avoided a piano teacher because of the very real terror of failing every week, (so far in my first 3 months)to get anything right. the hints about practise and technique i was hoping for, were sought in vain. as i said a sad disappointment.
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Format: Paperback
Noah Adams, in his book Piano Lessons, presents an honest, straight forward guide on achieving one's goal in middle age. This is not a just a book about piano lessons, but more a story about becoming who we really want to be, or even more, who we really are. Mr. Adams tells the truth about procrastination and about dedication, those traits that tend to haunt us through our middle years. Have we really achieved what we've wanted out of life? And what can we do if something is missing?
One thing Noah Adams did was keep a record of his goal setting and the achievement of that goal. By writing the book in the form of a journal, the reader is able to watch his progress as he sets out to learn to play the piano. He starts big, with the investment of an $11,000 Steinway and the rest is history. He stumbles through a Miracle Piano Teaching System on the computer ($259.95), various piano technique books, a music camp and finally some honest to goodness piano lessons. The book ends with Mr Adams presenting his wife, Neenah, with a concert for Christmas, complete with tuxedo, brass candlesticks, candles and the favorite pieces he has longed to play for many years.
This might sound overly sentimental, but to many of us who have procrastinated all of our lives in the music field, Piano Lessons is true inspiration. Mr Adams would be pleased to know that as soon as I finished the book, I perused the internet and ordered $75 worth of music books ("Hooked on Easy Classics"). I have built the fire in the little guest house where my inherited piano(my mother's) has rested for five years virtually untouched. I am going to warm up the strings and start playing.
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