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A Pioneer Sampler: The Daily Life of a Pioneer Family in 1840 Paperback – Mar 30 1998


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A Pioneer Sampler: The Daily Life of a Pioneer Family in 1840 + A Pioneer Thanksgiving: A Story of Harvest Celebrations in 1841
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin (Jp); Reprint edition (March 30 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0395883938
  • ISBN-13: 978-0395883938
  • Product Dimensions: 20 x 1.8 x 23.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 726 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #128,403 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Slaughtering hogs, making butter and telling time by the sun are all chronicled in the life of a pioneer family. PW said in a starred review: "As a resource, it's a must-have for anyone with even the remotest interest in this period of American history." Ages 8-12.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

Grade 5-8?Greenwood introduces the fictional Robertsons and, through the family's activities, describes the details of everyday life on the frontier circa 1840. This mix of story and information makes the book a natural for use in whole-language classrooms. Report writers in traditional programs will find useful facts and diagrams tucked in between the fictional segments. Food, clothing, schooling, social life, household equipment, building, and more are covered in the wide-ranging text. The detailed black-and-white drawings are both decorative and informative. Edwin Tunis covers a wider range of topics in Frontier Living (Crowell, 1976) for a slightly older audience. For younger readers, Raymond Bial's Frontier Home (Houghton, 1993) has a narrower focus; his full-color photographs of actual (and reproduced) artifacts add interest. Where pioneer living is part of the curriculum and for readers fascinated by the time period, Greenwood's title will be a welcome and useful addition.?Elaine Fort Weischedel, Turner Free Library, Randolph, MA
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback
I've read many books on pioneer life, and this is by far the best one for children. The book is about the Robertsons, a fictional family living in the west. While the family is fictional, the material is all drawn from real life.
The story takes you through a year in their lives, each chapter being its own story. After each chapter, the author provides explanatory material, giving detailed information about events and activities from the story. For example, there is a chapter about the children searching for a bee tree in order to find honey. In the explanatory material following the chapter, the author discusses beekeeping, division of labor among the bees, how the honey is actually made and the importance of honey to the early pioneers.
Unlike most books, we found the explanatory material every bit as captivating as the stories. In addition, the author suggests some activities children can do in order to learn more. Yesterday we conducted an experiment to see how the sap in the maple trees resists freezing because of its high sugar content. Today we made butter.
All in all, an excellent book. Thumbs up from [this family]
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By A Customer on July 1 2001
Format: Paperback
Barbara Greenwood has written a wonderful book that is as much fun for adults to read to children as it is for the children to read themselves. She doesn't just 'tell' about the Robertson's, she 'shows', drawing the reader into their lives...a pleasant place to be. I especially love Granny's story about how she came to America,on a ship, from Scotland.
The book is beautifully illustrated...all the way through...by Heather Collins. The pictures are so well done that, even as an adult, I would like to step into the scene!
There are instructions for simple, fun activities such as growing a potato plant, dyeing fabric using an onion, or making a cardboard jumping jack; pioneer games that will even entertain today's children for hours such as shadow shapes or knucklebones; and recipes that are easy for children.
Reading this book to a child is a great 'stress releaver'...it's like a little escape from the treadmill of life!!!
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By A Customer on May 27 1999
Format: Paperback
I love using this book in the classroom because of the way it takes each aspect of everyday pioneer living, and provides a non-fiction type short story along with more information about the job, skill, etc., along with an acitivity for the children to do.
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By A Customer on Nov. 22 2002
Format: Paperback
The Pioneer Sampler
The Pioneer Sampler is a fun and fascinating book. It tells about a pioneer family. Can Nekeek and Willy catch fish by hand? You'll find out. This is a fun book.
I'd give this book a five *...
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 28 reviews
24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
Experience pioneer life!!! July 1 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Barbara Greenwood has written a wonderful book that is as much fun for adults to read to children as it is for the children to read themselves. She doesn't just 'tell' about the Robertson's, she 'shows', drawing the reader into their lives...a pleasant place to be. I especially love Granny's story about how she came to America,on a ship, from Scotland.
The book is beautifully illustrated...all the way through...by Heather Collins. The pictures are so well done that, even as an adult, I would like to step into the scene!
There are instructions for simple, fun activities such as growing a potato plant, dyeing fabric using an onion, or making a cardboard jumping jack; pioneer games that will even entertain today's children for hours such as shadow shapes or knucklebones; and recipes that are easy for children.
Reading this book to a child is a great 'stress releaver'...it's like a little escape from the treadmill of life!!!
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
A wonderful book on pioneer life for children ages 6-14 May 9 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I've read many books on pioneer life, and this is by far the best one for children. The book is about the Robertsons, a fictional family living in the west. While the family is fictional, the material is all drawn from real life.
The story takes you through a year in their lives, each chapter being its own story. After each chapter, the author provides explanatory material, giving detailed information about events and activities from the story. For example, there is a chapter about the children searching for a bee tree in order to find honey. In the explanatory material following the chapter, the author discusses beekeeping, division of labor among the bees, how the honey is actually made and the importance of honey to the early pioneers.
Unlike most books, we found the explanatory material every bit as captivating as the stories. In addition, the author suggests some activities children can do in order to learn more. Yesterday we conducted an experiment to see how the sap in the maple trees resists freezing because of its high sugar content. Today we made butter.
All in all, an excellent book. Thumbs up from [this family]
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
Great , engaging book about pioneer life! March 10 2003
By Violet - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I loved this book. I read it before I gave it to my daughter. It is a fictional family, but all the information is true to life. Interspersed with the story of the Robertsons, you can learn how to make your own cheese, dip a candle, or learn to tell the time from the sun.
This book will add to your library, and is a nice complement to Laura Ingalls Wilders books. Homeschooling familys will enjoy it, I know we did.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Good Information, Bad Family Interactions March 25 2014
By Dinah - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book was recommended as a part of my homeschool curriculum for my second grader. Upon first receiving the book, I paged through, excited about the prospect of teaching this subject. However; as my eight year old daughter and I began reading the stories together, I was greatly disappointed in the representation of the family and how the siblings treated one another and their disrespectful attitude toward chores. I whole-heartedly agree with another reviewer who states that these interactions could have been completely eliminated from the book without losing any true value. For example:

1. Brother George "growled and stomped off. Sarah and Willy had learned to be careful of George when he was in a prickly mood."
2. "George always sneered at crybabies."
3. Willy put in charge of the new boy at school: "Let the snotty little weasel look out for himself."
4. Willy annoyed that he must bring in the stubborn cow: "Stupid, stupid, stupid critter."

These situations (as well as many others) are bothersome, especially when you are trying, as a parent, to teach your children how to respect others and be kind to them. It may have been better if the stories were written with some reconciliation or forgiveness, but they are not.

If it had not been for the experiment sections of the text, my rating would have been lower. We enjoyed learning about the different ways pioneers had to make food and clothes and were able to implement some of the projects into our schooling. The stories about the Robertson family though were definitely not a representation of how I would want my family to behave, regardless of the difference in eras. I was honestly shocked at the number of reviews that said their children loved the stories. I was embarrassed to read them aloud to my child whom I have taught not to be rude and use the word "stupid." I guess the lesson I have to remind her at the end of each story is that this is the way we SHOULDN'T treat others.
18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
Excellent teaching resource book! May 27 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I love using this book in the classroom because of the way it takes each aspect of everyday pioneer living, and provides a non-fiction type short story along with more information about the job, skill, etc., along with an acitivity for the children to do.


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