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Plantagenet Descent: Thirty One Generations from William the Conqueror to Today [Hardcover]

Thomas R. Moore


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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Thomas R Moore (February 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0964492903
  • ISBN-13: 978-0964492905
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 15.5 x 2.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 658 g
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,459,528 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 2.8 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
34 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Favorably reviewed in The New York Times and London Times. Aug. 22 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Favorably reviewed in The New York Times, the London Times Literary Supplement and The American Genealogist.
This book reveals one family for 31 generations from William the Conqueror in 1066 through Princess Elizabeth Plantagenet, daughter of King Edward I of England, through English royalty, nobility and gentry, through statesmen of the Elizabethan Age, through high government offices in Ireland, to Walsingham Moore who came to Canada in 1817, then down one line of his estimated 55,000 American descendants alive today (with many surnames) to contemporary joyous professional and personal lives in Manhattan. Many of us share part of the same history and genealogy but lack the records to know it. All will revel in this human, exciting and true story.
Thomas R. Moore, the distinguished New York lawyer, author and connoisseur, received his B.A. magna cum laude from Yale University and his J.D. from Harvard Law School. His deep knowledge of biography, genealogy and history and his ability to present a story clearly and compellingly captivates his readers from beginning to end. Recently he was granted a coat of arms and created a Knight of St. John by Queen Elizabeth II and inherited his ancestral title of Lord Bridestowe.
19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Disapointed March 15 2002
By Brian Smith - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
I purchased this book in hope off adding information and knowledge to my own genealogical research. The book was too narrow and offered no additional informantion helpful to me. I felt the line, although accurate, was not detailed enough to use as a building block twards other works. The information contained in this book could have easily been obtained in about 15 minutes on the internet. I really did not need to know about the author's current family or see any pictures of himself or offspring(Which there are Many). I feel the title was misleading and I was looking for a book more directed towards History rather than present. ... I supposed I would not be as disapointed if the price was say half of what I paid for it.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars What titles are these? Feb. 24 2010
By Drink Me - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
The accuracy of Thomas R. Moore's book aside, there are some errors of fact in the review dated 22 Aug 1998:

1. The Knights of St. John are not a British order of knighthood. They are an order of chivalry. The Knights of St. John grew out of the medieval Hospitallers, who were contemporaries of the Knights Templar. The Roman Catholic version of the Knights of St. John are a separate organization.

The British royal family has an association with the Knights of St. John. The 22 Aug 1998 review gives the impression that Thomas R. Moore was knighted in the sense that, say, Paul McCartney was knighted. This comment isn't meant to disparage the Knights of St. John, but to clarify who they are. It's not possible to "knight" an American. Honorary knighthoods are occasionally granted to prominent Americans, but honorary knighthoods don't allow the recipients to be called "Sir." The Order of St. John also doesn't permit a man to be called "Sir" or a woman to be called "Dame," even though the Order terms them "knights." Therefore, it's unclear by what right Thomas R. Moore claims the title of "Sir." He's apparently a knight of the Order, but he doesn't have the right to use the title "Sir."

2. According to "The Complete Peerage" (the authoritative reference on the subject), up until 1938, there was no barony of Bridestowe in Britain. I don't know what ancestral title Moore inherited.

Records are kept of knighthoods and peerages created in the UK (Great Britain). If Thomas R. Moore was knighted or succeeded to a barony in the UK, there will be a record of it. As far as can be determined, Thomas R. Moore holds no titles. The author of the 1998 review referenced these titles to demonstrate Moore's social prominence and should get the facts straight.
11 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good topic - misleading title Sept. 3 2002
By Warren - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
The approach of linking the great French (and subsequently English) family of Plantagenet of the early modern world to their contemporary American descendants, is a good one. Perhaps more space might have been devoted to contemporary Plantagenet family members in the direct male line as these do exist today (despite the best efforts of Henry VIII, scion of the dancing wardrobe master Owen Tudor). The Beaufort family of England or the de Warren family of France are conspicuous examples. It should also be noted that William the Conquerer was in no shape or form a Plantagenet. On the contrary, the Dukes of Normandy and the Counts of Anjou were traditional enemies and entirely distinct in origin.

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