Playmates (The Spenser Series Book 16) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 9.49
  • List Price: CDN$ 9.99
  • You Save: CDN$ 0.50 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Playmates has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Playmates Mass Market Paperback – Mar 1 1990


See all 16 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 9.49
CDN$ 1.35 CDN$ 0.01

Amazon.ca: Spring 2015 Books Preview
CDN$ 9.49 FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

Playmates + Stardust + Crimson Joy
Price For All Three: CDN$ 30.23

Buy the selected items together


Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Berkley; Reissue edition (March 1 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0425120015
  • ISBN-13: 978-0425120019
  • Product Dimensions: 10.5 x 2.1 x 17 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 91 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #204,929 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Boston private eye Spenser returns to investigate rumored cheating by Taft University's star basketball team in Parker's 19th novel, reported PW . Although enjoyable as Spenser tales always are, this resembles a long short story rather than a fully developed, substantive novel.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

With characteristic acerbic wit and impudent independence, Spenser tackles a case of alleged point shaving by Dwayne Woodcock, a famed black forward on the Taft University basketball team. Spenser discovers the truth of the allegation and ties to a New York mobster, but, because of Woodcock's illiteracy and sensible girlfriend, decides to save Woodcock's career if he can. The solution works itself out all too easily, even for Spenser; however, Parker's compressed prose, recognizable regulars, and no-nonsense action will satisfy his followers.-- REK
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
VINCE Haller invited me to lunch at the Clarendon Club on Commonwealth Avenue with the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Taft University, Haller's alma mater. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Hardcover
The sass quotient went off the charts in the opening of PLAYMATES, as Spenser lunched in luxury with a big shot trustee on the board of Taft University, then faced off with the cool cats at the college newspaper office (giving a classic line for the heart of journalism), then connected with the hot shot coach of the basketball team, which was allegedly shaving points somewhere in the ranks. Each time Spenser met a new person or persons I smirked in anticipation of how they'd respond to him and how he'd prod tender spots. Of course, whenever Spenser met someone worthy of him I all but leaped out of my chair and clicked my heels.

The return to the university scene reflected back to some of the themes and setting auras in THE GODWULF MANUSCRIPT, the pilot to the Spenser series. Parker's writing style seemed to take a reminiscent walk in PLAYMETES, as he described physical scenes with the crisp depth and detail of his first few novels which opened the series in the seventies. In a sense, PLAYMATES seemed to be a pleasant pivotal point for the trilogy of Spenser, Parker, and his readers, as many of the prior ingredients-with-pull in books 1 - 15 were surged and stirred into this pot of philosophical, literary gold.

When I ordered PLAYMATES from Amazon, for some reason, I was more curious than normal about the title, how it would fit into the plot. I was still wondering about the title, after having read to the last page of this novel's ingeniously unusual type of impossible solutions and resolutions, which went on to become one of the signatures of Parker's denouement genius.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In this edition of the exploits of Spenser and Hawk, it appears that there is a case of points shaving going on involving Tate University�s basketball team. The faculty board employs Spenser to investigate the allegation and report to them. As soon as he begins to dig, he receives a warning to back off or he will be killed. Although the threat was delivered in the nicest, most charming way, it only prompts him to dig harder and this brings the ever-reliable Hawk onto the case.
I was particularly amused at the outrage expressed by Spenser when he discovered the paltry sum his would-be assassins were being paid to take him out. What an insult, such a blow to the ego. You feel that Spenser and Hawk are always in control of the situation, no matter how dire or what the odds are. Not very realistic, true, but hey, it�s very entertaining and that�s what counts. The original sharp tongued, smooth and competent private investigator with the faithful sidekick/partner, Spenser books are always great reading and this is no exception.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Lawrance Bernabo HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on Jan. 17 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
After wallowing in the mind of a serial killer in the previous Spenser novel "Crimson Joy," it is something of a relief to discover "Playmates" is just about a college basketball points shaving scandal. Our hero is hired by Taft University to check into the rumors after the school paper runs a story without naming its sources. The school president was warned that Spenser would find out the truth, but then he would decide what to do about it in his own peculiar way, and to no one's surprise this is what happens. After being threatened by Coach Dixie Dunham, who is not used to deal with anybody with as unique a world view as Spenser and who does not want the teams chances for the Final Four to be hurt, our hero proceeds his merry way. Spenser then discovers that Dwayne Woodcock, arguably the best power forward in the country, has not been throwing games but has been costing his team enough points so that the team does not cover the spread. Spenser also learns that Dwayne Woodcock has made it to his senior year of college without being able to read, is owned by a hood from Brooklyn with ties to Gerry Bonz, has an annoying habit of referring to himself in the third person, and has a girlfriend named Chantel. Of all these things the one that bothers him the most is Dwayne's illiteracy and the one that makes him want to save the kid is Chantel. Now all he has to do is figure out a way to bring down the guy running the show without throwing Dwayne to the wolves.
The sixteenth novel in Robert B. Parker's series, "Playmates" is another one of those quick reads perfectly suited for the commuter lifestyle, which means you can get through it in a day or two.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In Playmates, Spenser investigates a point shaving scheme involving Taft University basketball players. Spenser quickly deduces that Taft star player Dwayne Woodcock is involved, and sets out to undo the illiterate young man's predicament, primarily out of respect for Dwayne's girlfriend Chantel.
Much like Parker's Double Deuce, Playmates delves into African American issues of self esteem and poverty. And much like Double Deuce, Parker stumbles by relying too much on trite popular press rationales for criminal conduct - all in defense of his own unsympathetic hoods. Spenser's affection for Chantel is intended to resolve this dilemma, but her character is so underdeveloped that there's no compelling motivation for Spenser's heroics.
But it's easy to overlook a thin plot, because the joy of a Parker novel is really Spenser's sassy wit and his violent outings with the devastating and equally humorous Hawk. Particularly enjoyable is a scene in which Hawk chides Spenser about the low street value currently offered to have him "aced." One wonders how Parker can write Hawk so unapologetically while offering up sociologic platitudes for any other African American character involved in questionable circumstances.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most recent customer reviews



Feedback