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Playtime (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray] (Version française)

4.4 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Actors: Jacques Tati, Barbara Dennek, Rita Maiden, France Rumilly, France Delahalle
  • Directors: Jacques Tati
  • Writers: Jacques Tati, Art Buchwald, Jacques Lagrange
  • Producers: Bernard Maurice, René Silvera
  • Format: Color, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: eOne Films
  • Release Date: Aug. 18 2009
  • Run Time: 115 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B002AFX532
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #45,123 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)
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Product Description

A great film by a great filmmaker.

Customer Reviews

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Format: Blu-ray
Play Time (1967)
Comedy, 124 minutes, French, English and German Language
Directed by Jacques Tati
Starring Jacques Tati and Barbara Dennek

There are many different types of comedy. Play Time is a combination of physical humor, farce and clever observational humor. There's very little dialogue, so don't be put off by the French, English and German language included in the description. This is all about watching a series of events and seeing the absurdity of it all.

Jacques Tati dedicated nine years of his life to the film and it was in production for three years. The sets were giant and the cast enormous. If you are familiar with Tati, you'll know that his Monsieur Hulot character appeared in four of his films and one short story. Play Time is the most celebrated, but the venture resulted in Tati declaring bankruptcy.

There isn't a plot as such, but the story opens in an airport. I think Tati was trying to show how vast and impersonal airports are. He also shows a lot of technology and demonstrates how ludicrous it is. In an early scene, he has a meeting in an office building. It's made of glass and contains dozens of identical cubicles. His arrival is logged on a computer, but the result is anything but efficient. In a comedy of errors, he keeps failing to make his presence known to the right person.

Hulot is a helpful person at heart, but everything he touches results in chaos. He improves some things and ruins others. Unlike just about every film in existence, Play Time doesn't focus on its characters. Instead of showing personal interactions, we see rooms, stores and streets filled with people. There are multiple interactions at all times. If you watch Play Time several times, you'll see something new every time.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Long before Mr. Bean, Jacques Tati unleashed M. Hulot on the scene. I saw this movie in a theatre over thirty years ago, and along with Mr. Hulot's Holiday, his first classic, I am glad Amazon has made them both available on DVD. If one enjoys gentle, subtle humour arising out of everyday events, I highly recommend both of these films.
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I enjoy all of Tati's movies and this was no exception. I now have 4 of his films which will be viewed over and over. His physical humour is what has me smiling from start to finish.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Arrived on time. I was very satisfied with the Blu-ray.
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Format: DVD
Jaques Tati movies has this amazing progression from basic simplicity and tradition, starting with M. Hulot's Holiday. To this modern, over sized, and confusing progression in Mon Oncle, and (to me) culminating in Play Time. And it's too bad Play Time was so misunderstood and ill received during it's creation and release. I think the best way to appreciate Tati's humor and vision is to watch the trio of films back to back. As in 'Holiday', the setting and people brings the viewer to Hulot. Serene simplicity that get's slowly corrupted upon M. Hulot's arrival and stay. A character just slightly more quirky than the others. Mon Oncle is the transition. Civilians are progressing for the future with their work and living quarters. While M. Hulot in his traditional quirkiness seems more advanced with his lifestyle. Yet more unyielding to be modernized. And it's with Play Time that the people are more funny than Hulot, in that they really don't fit in their own modern environment they created for themselves. Whereas M. Hulot (and clones of himself. How's that for progression?) seems to fit in and go with the flow almost un-noticeably. Unlike Modern Times, where Chaplin tries desperately to cope with mechanization. And unlike Inspector Clouseau movies, where he'll always be the hero at the end in some way or another. Play Time turns the tables on it all. M. Hulot is no longer the tourist. But goes out of his way to make the tourist feel comfortable. And does M. Hulot win in the end? As in Holiday, the tourist leaves, and a sense of normality will try to be regained. In Play Time, the tourist may have left just before total chaos was to ensue? Tati forces the viewer to think about what lead up to what they see in Play Time, and what may happen after. The viewer may anticipate gags that are comically missed.Read more ›
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