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Porno Paperback – May 27 2003


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Porno + Trainspotting + Skagboys
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: WW Norton; Reprint edition (May 27 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393324508
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393324501
  • Product Dimensions: 1.4 x 0.3 x 2.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 159 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #294,530 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Amazon

Porno is a sequel to Trainspotting, and builds on the success of that caustic and very funny novel by taking some of the characters through some radical new catastrophes. Sick Boy returns to Edinburgh with his ventures as a pimp and hustler in London having gone pear-shaped. Desperate for money, he comes up with a new idea, one that (he hopes) will really rake in the cash: the production of a low-rent porn film. Now Welsh introduces us to a new development: the novel’s Sick Girl, Nicola Fuller-Smith, the object of Sick Boy's fevered lust, whom he also believes will be his passport to all kinds of substance-abusing happiness – needless to say, he’s in for a rude awakening.

Other favourite characters from Trainspotting make a welcome reappearance: Renton, Begbie (even more psychotically dangerous than in the earlier book) and the unfortunate Spud, still unable to kick the drugs. Welsh fans need not hesitate: this is every bit as exuberant, hilarious, disgusting and irresistible as its predecessor.--Barry Forshaw --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

The Trainspotting gang returns in a sequel to Welsh's cult novel, this time trying to scheme their way into the annals of adult entertainment. Ten years older, but criminally irresponsible as ever, Sick Boy, Renton, Begbie and Spud are still focusing on illicit drugs and seedy sex. Budding entrepreneur Sick Boy or Simon, as he prefers to be called now comes up with the brilliant idea of starting a porno flick company in Edinburgh, and hunts down Renton in Amsterdam, where his former friend owns a nightclub. With the help of Nikki Fuller-Smith, a ravishing and frustrated undergraduate film student and part-time sex worker aching for fame, the two begin filming and marketing their first movie, making it all the way to the top of the industry before the inevitable crash. Meanwhile, homicidal Begbie and pathetic Spud lurk in the background, waiting to crash the party. To boost the hormonal rush of the narrative, Welsh tells the story from different points of view, the thickness of the dialect varying convincingly from voice to voice (English Nikki quotes from Middlemarch, while the nearly incomprehensible Begbie says things like "Ah lits um go tae git the bat wi baith hands"). As has been noted many times, Welsh has an uncanny talent for dialogue, and his writing is often diamond sharp (a sexual encounter is described as "raging bull and mad cow get on board the love boat"). If this follow-up feels less urgent than the original, it is no reflection on Welsh, but rather on the growing familiarity of the terrain he has so inimitably staked out.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jack on Oct. 13 2002
Format: Paperback
It's astonishing how a writer as limited as Welsh can write a book that gets under your skin and infects your use of language for days to come. His previous offering, Glue, made my friends and I talk like "schemies" from the new slums of Edinburgh for months to come. Unfortunately, Welsh always lets the side down a bit with the odd bit of stilted dialogue, or pointless analysis of his own sexual (and political) obsessions. Porno is another example of his dual tendency: compulsion and drivel. Like most of his other books, Porno has moments of boredom and rubbish, most notably seen in the subplot of Leith schemies making a porno film. (Is this a nod to Jane Austen's Mansfield Park?)Welsh's disturbing fixation with hardcore porn - seen also in previous works like Filth and, to a lesser extent, Ecstasy - nearly ruins the book; however, this semi-sequel to Trainspotting manages to compel the reader to devour the book in one or two sittings. I won't discuss the plot any further, as I do not want to ruin the razor edge suspense that will drive you inexorably onwards through the novel. However, it obviously follows up on the aftermath of the scam which formed the climax of Trainspotting. If you're a newcomer to Welsh's work, start with his earlier books. If ambivalent, Glue and The Acid House are probably the only Welsh books you should bother with. But if you can't get enough of the sociological ground-level analysis of Thatcher's Scottish orphans that Welsh provides, than you're probably reading this book already. Enjoy, but be prepared for your eyes to glaze over at Welsh's neuroses.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robert D. Merkamp on June 1 2004
Format: Paperback
Well, it's ten years after Mark Renton stole the loot the Trainspotting boys made off the drug sale and Begbie went to prison and his other "friends" Sick Boy and Spud are up to their normal routines. Sick Boy decides to leave London and go back to Leith and quickly falls in with a friend who's into porno. Sick Boy sees a career (and a ton of money for himself) and begins the scam to make himself rich. He digs up Renton and talks him into returning to help him and soon they begin scamming each other. Finally, Begbie gets out of prison (it hasn't mellowed him) and he's looking for Renton and his revenge.
The book is a high energy romp through a segment of the pornography business and Welsh keeps ratcheting up the tension as time goes on and the book approaches it's climax. Despite that, he continues to approach the topic (and his characters) with a good deal of humor. This is a real page turner and deserves to be picked up.
I've heard rumors of a movie being planned which would be great. Don't let the title mislead you, the book is not primarily about sex but rather the industry, the deals, and the crazy lives of the players. Many old Trainspotting favorites turn up (some briefly but often memorably) and the new characters are interesting to follow as well.
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By N. Turner on June 11 2005
Format: Paperback
Welcome back to the world of "radges," "fitba" and ... well many more words I daren't say herein.
If you ever wondered what happened to the boys from Leith, wonder no more. They are back, and in technicolor. Welsh offers us a look at how the gang is doing in the mid-nineties (you are left to your own devices to figure out exactly when it takes place). The best you can say is "Well, at least they kicked heroin."
The primary focus is on Sick Boy and his endless "scams" (each chapter told from his point of view is a numbered scam, i.e. "Scam No. 11,452" - every chapter rotates among different characters' p.o.v., each with its own style, dialogue and outlook). This time, he's in it to make pornograpic movies, and the way he lures in his accomplices makes you want to bathe. But, as you will soon find out, he's not the only one using other human beings for financial gain.
The first third primarily focuses on catching up with all the crew, as well as some new characters, like Nikki, Sick Boy's main squeeze. She the beautiful if neurotic Scottish lass who dreams of grandeur while living with (and dating) the dregs. Sick Boy is up to no good, but in his usual, charming way, and even though he's a full-fledged fraud, you find yourself rooting for him; at least until the end. Then there's Begbie, the psychotic, paranoid killer, just out of jail, and in the mood to track down those that wronged him (and to find who has been sending him gay porn in prison). The first encounter each character has with Begbie is particularly fun.
Moving on to the hefty middle, we see everyone's plans take shape, including Spud's quest for redemption and Rent's quest to make amends.
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Format: Paperback
Most of the critical takes on Welsh revolve around the blow, smack & x which his characters ingest on an epic scale. I find all of this has been overrated. There are all these morons who want to trivialize him as some sort of party beast who ingests horse tranquilizers on a daily basis. Better living through chemistry. Well, if you think W.S. Burroughs was just a junky then you've reached the end of your choke chain. You are a functional illiterate. Time to buy a vowel. Sure, Welsh's characters swim in controlled substances just as sperm swim in semen. Wittgenstein was a beery swine who was very rarely sober. The point is that Welsh is the greatest prose stylist of the psychic landscape since old Germs Juice himself. Like Joyce, Welsh's command of the interior swamplands of consciousness is simply f-ing terrifying at times. Marabou Stork Nightmares & Filth (with the Pig on the cover) were key examples. I was in an altered mental state for a month after reading those two. It wasn't pretty, but it felt real. And yet Welsh has such a command of dialogue that this psychic miasma becomes a sort of exterior monologue- when he wants it to. It makes you want to cheer- that the apparently impossible expression can actually be articulated, at least in the books. Maybe this seems easy to you, but it's not. That's the brilliance of it, making it feel really natural. It's like DeNiro- the trick is in the ease & elegance of it, the flow of talk. Porno is a riot- a true comic novel- I laughed myself sick & kicked my cat without really meaning to, it was so funny. I am an American, but I learned Scottish just so I could read Irvine Welsh...go on with it, mate.
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