CDN$ 109.95 + CDN$ 3.49 shipping
In Stock. Sold by Vanderbilt CA
Add to Cart
or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.

More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
      

A Portrait: Music For Small Or


Price: CDN$ 109.95
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Vanderbilt CA.
2 new from CDN$ 44.99

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details

  • Audio CD (Sept. 16 1997)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Universal Music Group
  • ASIN: B000001GXW
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #127,095 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Music For Small Orchestra(1926): I. Slow, Pensive
2. Music For Small Orchestra(1926): II. In Roguish Humor. Not Fast
3. Three Chants(1930): 1. To An Unkind God
4. Three Chants(1930): 2. To An Angel (With Soprano Solo)
5. Three Chants(1930): 3. To A Kind God (With Soprano And Alto Solo)
6. Piano Study In Mixed Accents: Piano Study In Mixed Accents(1930)
7. Three Songs: 1. Rat Riddles(1930)
8. Three Songs: 2. Prayers Of Steel(1932)
9. Three Songs: 3. In Tall Grass(1931)
10. String Quartet 1931: I. Rubato assai
11. String Quartet 1931: II. Leggiero
12. String Quartet 1931: III. Andante
13. String Quartet 1931: IV. Allegro possibile
14. 2 Ricercare (1932): Sacco, Vanzetti
15. 2 Ricercare (1932): Chinaman, Laundryman
16. Andante For Strings (1938)
17. Rissolty Rossolty
18. John Hardy (1940)
19. Suite (1952): I. Allegretto
20. Suite (1952): II. Lento rubato
See all 21 tracks on this disc

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Forbes on Jan. 27 2004
Format: Audio CD
Ruth Crawford Seeger - A Portrait
The male-dominated atmosphere of most of the arts in history has made the search for women's voices often a very difficult one, even for women earlier in this century. So many women of original achievement or promising talent were eclipsed by the men in their lives; think of Alma Mahler for instance, who had a real talent for the human voice, but sublimated it to the promotion of the music of her husband, and then to the promotion of the arts of her other husbands. Sometimes this searching for earlier women's voices leads to the promotion of composers with somewhat dubious abilities such as Amy Beach. But other times it reveals composers of freshness and distinction. Such is the case with Ruth Crawford Seeger. Her output, though small, is some of the most distinctive and original of her generation.
Ruth Crawford began her career in Chicago, at the time, hardly a hotbed of musical experimentation. However, even in this out of the way location, she was able to keep abreast of the new musical experiments in Europe. Music for Small Orchestra represents her music of this time, impressionistic but non-tonal. There are echoes of Ives in the work, as well as Scriabin, and Debussy. The orchestral imagination is distinctive and both works show evidence of considerable formal innovation. The Three Chants continues in this mystical vein, but with even more evidence of development of craft.
In the 1930s Crawford Seeger moved to New York and became active in the most radical wing of American composition. Influenced by iconoclastic composers like Henry Cowell, Varese, Ives, and her husband, Charles Seeger, she adopted a technique of "dissonant counterpoint".
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
The Best of 1930s Modernism Jan. 27 2004
By Christopher Forbes - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Ruth Crawford Seeger - A Portrait
The male-dominated atmosphere of most of the arts in history has made the search for women's voices often a very difficult one, even for women earlier in this century. So many women of original achievement or promising talent were eclipsed by the men in their lives; think of Alma Mahler for instance, who had a real talent for the human voice, but sublimated it to the promotion of the music of her husband, and then to the promotion of the arts of her other husbands. Sometimes this searching for earlier women's voices leads to the promotion of composers with somewhat dubious abilities such as Amy Beach. But other times it reveals composers of freshness and distinction. Such is the case with Ruth Crawford Seeger. Her output, though small, is some of the most distinctive and original of her generation.
Ruth Crawford began her career in Chicago, at the time, hardly a hotbed of musical experimentation. However, even in this out of the way location, she was able to keep abreast of the new musical experiments in Europe. Music for Small Orchestra represents her music of this time, impressionistic but non-tonal. There are echoes of Ives in the work, as well as Scriabin, and Debussy. The orchestral imagination is distinctive and both works show evidence of considerable formal innovation. The Three Chants continues in this mystical vein, but with even more evidence of development of craft.
In the 1930s Crawford Seeger moved to New York and became active in the most radical wing of American composition. Influenced by iconoclastic composers like Henry Cowell, Varese, Ives, and her husband, Charles Seeger, she adopted a technique of "dissonant counterpoint". This technique, though it tends to be forgotten now in favor of concentration on European serial procedures, was integral in the music of the American radicals. Crawford Seeger's work from this period makes the best case possible for the style, which she uses with facility and ingenuity. The Three Songs for Contralto and instrumental ensemble show her new-found abilities in this style. The work is highly expressive, with a constantly changing background "ostinato"...a truly impressive work.
Crawford Seeger's masterpiece in this style is her String Quartet of 1931. Tightly organized around pithy motives, this is one of the most impressive modernist works written by an American. Her freely atonal style is better developed than the styles of other similar modernists like Copland or Sessions at the time. Yet the work is also marked by logical clarity, and deeply felt emotional content. The Andante in particular is an impressive work and makes an even better string orchestra piece in its 1938 transcription.
As Crawford Seeger and her husband became more and more involved in Marxist politics, their musical interests changed as well. The Adorno influenced aesthetic they had both embraced in the early 30s (modernism in music linked with leftist politics) gave way to a more populist ideal, perhaps reflecting some of the political and artistic concerns in contemporary communist Russia. In any case, both Seegers gave up composing for a long while and became interested in the folk song revival. Moving to the Washington, DC area, the couple worked with Alan and John Lomax at the Smithsonian Institution, helping to collect and arrange a treasury of American folk music. This change to folk music deeply affected the music that Crawford Seeger did write at the time. Rissolty Rossolty from 1939 is an example of a rare piece of music from this time. Written in an idiom that suggests the forms of an Ives piece, with the harmonic restraint of Copland's American period, the work is pleasant, if not as strikingly innovative as her early work.
In the 1950s after taking time off to raise her children, the folk singers Peggy and Pete Seeger, Crawford returned to original composition with the intriguing Suite for Wind Quintet. This work suggests that she was on the brink of discovering a way to mix her early modernist style with her later interest in folk music. The melodies of the Suite are derived from folk music, but highly segmented and manipulated, so that all that remains of the original target tune is the mere suggestion of folkiness. Instead the work resembles a slightly more dissonant French-influenced music, rather like a spiky Poulenc. It is not a masterpiece, but it is an intriguing but ultimately sad picture of the composer. Tragically, she died soon after writing this work.
The performances on this disc are by the Schonberg Ensemble led by Oliver Knussen. They are exemplary. Crawford Seeger is one American composer from this period who I think that European musicians can "get" without much effort. The vocal music is sung by Lucy Shelton, who is terrific in modernist repertoire. I don't think one could ask for a better introduction to this wonderful composer than this disc.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
True artist; enduring works Oct. 28 2012
By hh - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
How easy to fit in, how challenging to do your own thing when it flies in the face of cultural mandates. Crawford was visionary and courageous and I love celebrating her life and music. She refused to succumb to the atonal fascists and said: music is head and heart, don't put unnecessary yokes on a composer. So, she used dissonance and atonality well, but never became one of the boys, never became a slave to style. She wrote good music and waited for the world to get ready to accept it. She paid a price (how many music buildings on campuses are named after her?) But she left us some great work and a blueprint for what a real artist does and how he/she can live their lives fully and sincerely.

Product Images from Customers

Search


Feedback