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Postcards From A Young Man

Manic Street Preachers Audio CD
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
Price: CDN$ 9.49 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Product Details


1. (It's Not War) Just The End Of Love
2. Postcards From A Young Man
3. Some Kind Of Nothingness
4. The Descent - (Pages 1 & 2)
5. Hazelton Avenue
6. Auto-Intoxication
7. Golden Platitudes
8. I Think I Found It
9. A Billion Balconies Facing The Sun
10. All We Make Is Entertainment
11. The Future Has Been Here 4 Ever
12. Don't Be Evil

Product Description

Product Description

2010 release, the 10th studio album from the Welsh trio. Postcards From A Young Man is the follow up to 2009's Journal For Plague Lovers but is musically very different and more in the vein of Send Away The Tigers and Everything Must Go with unashamed soaring choruses, lots of strings and gospel choirs. It was recorded in Cardiff with producer Dave Eringa and mixed by Chris Lord Alge in the U.S. The album features guest vocals from Ian McCulloch ("Some Kind of Nothingness"), John Cale on piano ("Auto-Intoxication") and Duff McKagen playing bass ("A Billion Balconies Facing The Sun"). Manics bassist Nicky Wire sings lead vocals on "The Future Has Been Here 4 Ever" alongside drummer Sean Moore on the trumpet. Columbia.

Product Description

MANIC STREET PREACHERS Postcards From A Young Man (2010 UK 12-track CD album - Ten albums into their lifes work it would be wrong to say that the Manic Street Preachers are raging against the dying of the light. Postcards From A Young Man comes after the acclaimed Journal For Plague Lovers a record of steely intent and corrosive power on which every lyric was taken from the final folder of work left by former member Richey Edwards just prior to his disappearance in 1995. That album in turn was a typically stark and startling follow-up to 2007s triumphantly resurgent Send Away The Tigers an album that gave new heart to their global faithful. Postcards... may be their best yet. Defiantly unapologetically bold and forthright and communicative it makes the head swim with both the thrill of its tunes and its theories [always a heady Manics mix] and burns with that raging melancholia that has always been unique to them. Includes the single [Its Not War] Just The End Of Love and features a guest appearance by Echo & The Bunnymens Ian McCulloch)

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Most helpful customer reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Welsh Rockers are Still Rocking March 3 2011
Format:Audio CD
If the Manics' last release, the impressive Journal For Plague Lovers, was an attempt to return to the anarchic sounds of their classic 1994 The Holy Bible, then Postcards From A Young Man is their attempt to recreate the awesomeness of their 1996 release Everything Must Go. The use of gospel choirs and orchestration is certainly evocative of Everything Must Go, and the songs are suitably catchy. The highlight is Some Kind of Nothingness, where James Dean Bradfield and Nicky Wire's trading of vocals works remarkably well. This is a strong collection of songs, and a worthy follow-up to Plague Lovers.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars  13 reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Manics in KILLER powerpop mode... Jan. 22 2011
By Larry Davis - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
This record is great and kind of ironic...according to Nicky Wire, PFAYM is intended to be their last record aiming for commication with the masses...but it's not available domestically in the US, only their 2nd that is import only...the other is their misfired 2005 New Wave/Synthpop record "Lifeblood", and the 2 solo works...but their prior album, 2009's "Journal For Plague Lovers" was released and promoted here, and it was willfully difficult and uncommercial, yet great, a stylistic followup to 1994's "The Holy Bible" with Richie-penned lyrics...ironically, THB was released here as a 10th anniversary deluxe edition only, but never on it's initial release.

Anyhoo, "Postcards" is an intentionally big, melodic, orchestral even, POP/powerpop record, with soaring choruses, strings, choirs, etc, but done Manics-style, with policial-leaning lyrics that are personal and emotional, with resources that are obscure to most and referenced in unique ways...like all their works, T.S. Eliot is quoted in the book(let), among many. The single "(It's Not War) Just The End Of Love" is a typically great Manics-styled pop tune, along the lines of "A Design For Life" or "Your Love Alone Is Not Enough", but very 2010, not retro. All 12 tunes are killer. Yes, there are B-sides on singles and 2 Japanese-only bonus tracks, but this deluxe box is not worth it to me...the demos are on, er, CASSETTE???!!??? And the DVD is good for maybe 1 watching...question is, how long is it?? And the spiral scrapbook is cool, as are the postcards, but you get the book condensed in the 2CD deluxe version, with the demos on a second CD, not cassette...so that version, in a gold-coloured, hard-covered book package (also limited edition and weirdly not available on Amazon), is better for me, and it's 80 bucks cheaper...I was a tad worried about the CDs though, as the pockets in the covers were a TAD too tight, but they are OK.

I'm also weirded out that "Postcards" is not available in the States domestically because this record is tailor-made for US radio and these songs would go over so well live and win over some American fans...but me, I've been a Manics freak since 1991 and "Genration Terrorists"...not easy being an American Manics fan, as this country never gave this Welsh trio any love over the years...

A shame totally.
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Manics at their finest!! Sept. 22 2010
By Andrew - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Wow, what an album. I have been a Manics fan for a long, long time and this is among their finest work to date. I would love for this album to get some attention in the states because it could be huge here if people would just hear it. Manics fans need to be calling/writing radio stations demanding to hear them on American radio. They said their goal was to reach mass audiences with this album and if this album can't do it, then I don't know what can.
Amazing, I wish I could give it more than 5 stars. A great album to introduce people to the Manics with, very accessible without compromising their music or style.
LOVE IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars epic, high-gloss U.K. "alternative" stadium rock April 5 2011
By Charlie Quaker - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Welsh band who have become legendary in England (and remain largely unknown here)
release their 10th album since 1992. This is big, epic, high-gloss, orchestrated U.K. stadium rock
born of the peculiar strictures of British societal culture. The songs have a near-commercial
appeal that belies their lyrical intent, while the overblown choruses slowly reel you in with their
effusive excess. Includes guest spots from Ian McCullough (Echo & the Bunnymen) and Duff
McKagan (Guns N' Roses). Sometimes reminiscent of The Dears, Muse, Arcade Fire, The Kinks.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Welsh Rockers are Still Rocking March 3 2011
By S. Jones - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
If the Manics' last release, the impressive Journal For Plague Lovers, was an attempt to return to the anarchic sounds of their classic 1994 The Holy Bible, then Postcards From A Young Man is their attempt to recreate the awesomeness of their 1996 release Everything Must Go. The use of gospel choirs and orchestration is certainly evocative of Everything Must Go, and the songs are suitably catchy. The highlight is Some Kind of Nothingness, where James Dean Bradfield and Nicky Wire's trading of vocals works remarkably well. This is a strong collection of songs, and a worthy follow-up to Plague Lovers.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars for the masses Nov. 20 2010
By T. Duham - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Clearly the approach here, as apparently desired by lead singer James Dean Bradfield, is a final attempt to reach the masses. As an American, I really wish they would. The Manics are spot on with intelligent message, 80's guitar sounds, excellent drums and bass. This has been produced with all the right pop hooks to keep many people listening for quite a while. I was fortunate to catch the last U.S. tour when they were in San Francisco, all I can say is, superb!
What I can't understand is, IF it's true that this release is a final attempt to reach the masses, WTF (why) is it only available as import 2 months past it's release date? There is something seriously wrong with record companies still treating music as if it were only available as LP/cassette, and holding back music from the fans that really want to support good music. If you are down with class act rock and roll, I suggest shelling out for the import, you won't be sorry. Long live Welsh talent!
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