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Postmodern Fairy Tales: Gender and Narrative Strategies Paperback – Dec 24 2004

5 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press (Dec 24 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812216830
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812216837
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 1.3 x 21.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 136 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #288,186 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

Review

"An extraordinary book, and a 'first' on the topic."-Jack Zipes "Examining the workings of the powerful desire machines built into postmodern versions of 'Snow White,' 'Little Red Riding Hood,' 'Beauty and the Beast,' and 'Bluebeard,' Cristina Bacchilega's astute rereadings uncover intriguing mirrorings and revisions."-Ruth B. Bottigheimer, State University of New York at Stony Brook

About the Author

Cristina Bacchilega is Associate Professor of English at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and editor of the Italian-language volume La narrativa postmoderna in America: Testi e contesti.


Inside This Book

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ABUNDANCE, RATHER THAN LACK, motivates this study. Read the first page
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Cristina Bacchilega's exploration of postmodern revisions and appropriations of fairy tales is a superb endeavor. She provides an excellent overview of the fairy tale as a genre and goes on to explicate narrative and gender strategies in well-known tales like "Snow White," "Little Red Riding Hood," "Beauty and the Beast" and "Bluebeard." She frames her analysis of postmodern tales through a deconstructive lens, looking for each revision's ability to challenge conventional fairy tale morals, to be both "questioning and affirmative without necessarily being recuperative or politcally subversive." Her approach is exciting and her analysis brings new depth and meaning to fairy tales, making the familiar new once again.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa6a33414) out of 5 stars 1 review
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa6e0c234) out of 5 stars Postmodern Fairy Tales May 25 2000
By Jennifer Aldridge - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Cristina Bacchilega's exploration of postmodern revisions and appropriations of fairy tales is a superb endeavor. She provides an excellent overview of the fairy tale as a genre and goes on to explicate narrative and gender strategies in well-known tales like "Snow White," "Little Red Riding Hood," "Beauty and the Beast" and "Bluebeard." She frames her analysis of postmodern tales through a deconstructive lens, looking for each revision's ability to challenge conventional fairy tale morals, to be both "questioning and affirmative without necessarily being recuperative or politcally subversive." Her approach is exciting and her analysis brings new depth and meaning to fairy tales, making the familiar new once again.


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