Prayers for the Assassin: A Novel (Assassin Trilogy) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Prayers for the Assassin:... has been added to your Cart
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by WonderBook-USA
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Ships from the US. Expected delivery 7-14 business days.Serving Millions of Book Lovers since 1980. Very Good condition.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Prayers for the Assassin: A Novel Mass Market Paperback – Oct 31 2006


See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 9.99
CDN$ 2.59 CDN$ 0.01



Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Pocket Books; 1 edition (Oct. 31 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 141650768X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1416507680
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 3 x 17.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 272 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #677,147 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Taking post-9/11 conspiracy theories that blamed the attacks on Zionist agents as the seed for this unusual thriller, Ferrigno (The Wake-Up) posits a nuclear terrorist onslaught in 2015 on New York City, Washington, D.C., and Mecca that has all the earmarks of a Mossad operation. The blue states are moved by these horrors to convert to Islam, while the red states break away from the Islamic Republic, forming a Christian republic in the South. By 2040, three major parties struggle for control in the Islamic Republic: the moderate State Security forces, under Redbeard; the Black Robes, a fundamentalist religious police force; and the top-secret Assassins, under the Old One. When Sarah Dougan, Redbeard's niece and a respected historian, reinvestigates the 2015 attack for a new book, The Zionist Betrayal?, the Old One sics his deadliest assassin on her. Running from Seattle to Vegas, Sarah has a protector in her lover, an ex-fedayeen soldier named Rakkim Epps, whose agnostic POV anchors the novel. Fans of instapundit politics will love this thriller, which has the cinematic motion and atrocity F/X of a good airport read. However, Ferrigno's gimmick—the transformation of America into a cartoon version of Islam—lends the proceedings a damaging air of implausibility. (Feb.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Booklist

In a huge departure from his edgy thrillers set in the glittering wasteland of contemporary L.A. (Flinch, 2001; The Wake-Up, 2004), Ferrigno sets his ninth novel in the year 2040. The U.S. has been rent by civil strife and a nuclear attack that leveled New York and Washington, D.C. The nation is now divided into the Islamic States of America, whose capital is in Seattle, and the Bible Belt, located in the South. Young and fearless researcher Sarah Dougan, a moderate Muslim who frequently chafes at the restrictions placed on women, discovers that the nuke attacks long blamed on Israel were in fact carried out by a fanatical Muslim billionaire who intends to take over the nation by launching an unprecedented attack on the Christian South. Intending to verify her explosive findings, Sarah must go into hiding, where she is joined by her lover, former elite Muslim warrior Rakkim Epps. The two zigzag their way across an unrecognizable U.S., dogged by a psychopathic rogue assassin named Darwin. Ferrigno deserves props for his imaginative portrayal of a futuristic America, which is often highlighted through startling details, as when the second half of the Super Bowl must wait on midday prayers. But his new novel lacks his usual edge and his signature dialogue. Still, with its inventive setting and violent, action-packed, even controversial storyline, this novel should have no trouble finding an audience. Joanne Wilkinson
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dan Ronco on May 28 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Here's the essential problem --- the foundation of the story isn't believable. Ferrigno bases his plot on the idea that the world believes that a nuclear attack on New York City, Washington, DC and Mecca in 2015 is the work of Israeli agents. As a result, most of the USA converts to Islam, with a group of the southern states breaking away to form a Christian nation.

It doesn't ring true. A novelist, particularly someone writing speculative fiction, asks his readers to suspend disbelief, but he has to present a realistic premise. Why would anyone believe that Israel, which depends on America for its survival, would attack US cities and then throw in Mecca for good measure? And even if you believed Israelis were responsible for the attack, why would you lose your faith and convert to Islam?

Nevertheless, I ignored this ridiculous concept and kept reading. The action is set in 2040. Sarah Dougan, a respected historian, isn't convinced it was an Israeli attack, so she begins to dig into the story. When the Old One, a mysterious Muslin leader, learns of Sarah's investigation, he hires Darwin, a deadly assassin, to take care of Sarah. With the assistance of Rakkim Epps, her secret lover, Sarah races to uncover the true terrorist while Darwin murders just about everyone she contacts.

Once I pushed aside the premise, I found a gripping thriller that kept my interest. Ferrigno should be commended for a balanced portrayal of Islam; even depicting Sarah and Rakkim as moderate Muslims.

Overall, Prayers for the Assassin is a pretty good near-future thriller.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Larry Dunn on Jan. 30 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Because I have enjoyed virtually every book that Robert Ferrigno had written, I looked forward to this one but I was disappointed by the unfortunate future that he created. With superhuman assassins and highly improbable occurrences, the author moves away from the gritty world of wiseguys and snappy dialog that filled his earlier, much more realistic books. I, for one, hope he re-thinks this trilogy and goes back to the present.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Jason on May 12 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This book is predominantly marketed as speculative fiction, and in that sense, it's...not the best. The premise, or at least the catalyst in the novel, is just a little too absurd to be taken seriously by anyone not in a neoconservative thinktank. However, it's written much in the style of a thriller, and despite the that it's futuristic, really just boils down to a spy thriller within a fictional near future. And as a thriller, it's actually pretty good.

The year is 2040 and the United States is divided into four political entities: 1) the Mormon territories (henceforth unimportant to the novel or this review), 2) the Bible Belt, a Protestant holdout against Muslim hegemony whose politics remain arcane to us, 3) the Islamic States of America, a predominantly Muslim yet “free” country in the north and west whose Christian minority is mostly Catholic, and 4) the Nevada Free State, a secessionist independent where Las Vegas has become the central hub of North America. The book focuses on the ISA. Rakkim Epps is a former Fedayeen (basically military special ops) shadow warrior (basically sleeper cell agent) in love with the niece of the head of State Security (who's one of the top most powerful men in the country; picture Secretary of Defence). The niece, Sarah, goes missing and Rakkim comes out of retirement to track her down. Sarah, who wrote a controversial book about the rise of Islam in America, has stumbled across a bin Laden-esque plot by a Muslim mastermind known as “The Old One” which began decades ago and with only slight hiccoughs has succeeded in a knew Holocaust and steadily built a global caliphate as prophesied in Muslim eschatology. The Old One, desperate to keep his web of lies secret, dispatches Darwin, a former assassin of the Fedayeen, after Rakkim and Sarah.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 117 reviews
94 of 102 people found the following review helpful
A future I hope we never see Feb. 10 2006
By Brian Baker - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I won't rehash the storyline here; you can read that in the publishing reviews.

I will preface by saying that I spent five years living in the Middle East, and I have to say that based on my experience Ferrigno accurately captures the mind-set and atmosphere that pervades societies run by Muslim theocrats.

This book should serve as a wake-up call for those who value traditional Western values in today's atmosphere of radical Islamo-fascism. In that respect it's very Orwellian.

But better still, there's a really good story wrapped into this package, and I jammed through this book very quickly. The characters are fully fleshed out, engaging, and believable. You really like the good guys, and hate the bad guys. Darwin, the "Assasin", is a terrific villain; complex, many-faceted, extremely dangerous; kind of an athletic Hannibal Lechter without the medical degree. The plot is tight, complex and believable; the climax is satisfying.

I really recommend this book. Ferrigno's done a great job, and this has prompted me to see if he's written other books which I haven't yet read so I can get hold of them.
31 of 36 people found the following review helpful
Ferrigno: I Can't Wait For The Sequel! (Just Brush Up On The Islam A Bit) April 13 2006
By Caesar M. Warrington - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Robert Ferrigno does make some glaring mistakes in his presentation of Islam. In the new society it seems as if he freely mixes Sunni and Shi'ite together, naming an airport after Khomeini (a Shi'ite), yet using the term, "imam" in the Sunni sense of the word. And Ferringno clearly has little understanding of the exclusively Shi'ite practice of "muta'a" ("pleasure marriage" or temporary marriage). There is more to Shi'ite temporary marriage than Ferrigno has it with johns driving into the ruins of Disneyland, banging hookers and when finished merely pronouncing three times: "I divorce thee." Muta'a is not condoned or practiced by the world's majority Sunni Muslim community. Even most Shi'ites today are embarrassed of it. As for calling the headscarf "habib," Ferrigno never called it any such thing! The term he uses is "hajib" which is probably an honest to goodness typo for "hijab" (by the way, "hajib" was the term used for a court official in Muslim Spain and North Africa).

I believe the previous reviewer is trying to make Ferrigno out as some sort of bigot or islamophobe. I don't see it. Rather, although there is harsh prejudice against the remaining Catholic minority, he shows that the majority of Americans in the world of PRAYERS FOR THE ASSASSIN are now Muslims and they just want to live their lives in peace and happiness. That is why there is a small faction of hardliners (the Dark Robes) trying to impose a Talibani style of society and also why you have the Hasan-i-Sabah wannabe, the "Old One" conspiring to bring about the rebirth of the Caliphate. Let us also not forget that the heroes of this story, Rakkim and Sarah, are both proud Muslims.

All that being said, let me just add that this is still one fantastic novel. Ferrigno incorporates the best elements of the thriller and the alternative history and future shock genres into one supercharged and gripping tale of a broken and demoralized America.

I believe Ferrigno is making some clever and pointed statements about the spiritual state of affairs in America with this book.

We now live in a land where the mall, not the church, is now the center of town. In a time when you need to wait in line for almost anything but a seat at church. More Americans nowadays care to know every triviality about their favorite actors, athletes, singers, even pornstars, than what is going on in their government, their religion, their world. Ferrigno created a world where these negative trends and selfish pursuits of ours might take us. The celebrity and the popular culture are what really matters for far too many Americans today. Note that where in real life the values of faith and family and tradition are still strong - the South and Utah, or amongst the Latino Catholic populations in the Southwest, Ferrigno has them in his novel to be either independent of the Islamic Republic or on the verge of rebellion.

Ferrigno's seems to understand that when you no longer believe in 'something,' you are now open to believe in 'anything.'
58 of 71 people found the following review helpful
art becoming life Feb. 8 2006
By Maureen Zimmerman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I read this book in 2 days, couldn't put it down, or shut up about it!If you enjoyed "The Handmaid's Tale" by Attwood, you'll recognize the world tipped on it's head, though with even greater horror and worse, the very real plausibity of it! Just look around and watch the Islamic world riot and terrorize and threaten beheadings for caricatures/cartoons published in Denmark, and listen for the moderate islamic voices--they're no where to be found. You'll love the strong characters who stay with you long after you've finished reading. You will also no longer view current world events in the same way. You will shudder at the looming possibity. Another fun task I had was looking for areas that seem like "clues" for a message hidden in the "mistakes" in the text. I'm reading the book again with a closer eye toward this. Such as the character Marian on one page being referred to as Miriam on the page opposite; and the scene in the roller rink described on the left hand page and the character sliding on the ice on the opposite page; then further down the page going back and referring to the singing wheels on the skates! No way is this a sloppy book. I'm having great fun with it. Haven't enjoyed a book like this in quite awhile. So I'm off to buy 4 more books to give to friends.
19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
A futuristic thriller that delivers! Feb. 17 2006
By Bill Pullman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I picked up this book last week at the bookstore, never heard of the author before but it looked interesting. Let me say it was a good decision! This is one of the most stimulating thrillers I have ever read, and I have since been surprised to learn he has written 8 other novels (I'll be going back to check them out). The story is set in 2040, the U.S. is awash in civil strife after a Washington DC and New York are leveled by a Nuclear attack. The nation has been split into two sections: The Islamic States of America to the north and the Bible Belt to the south. Sarah Dougan is a moderate Muslim who uncovers that the nuclear attacks on the US were planned by a Muslim billionaire and not the Israelis who had taken the fall. To make matters worse this fanatical Muslim billionaire now plans to take over the southern United States! Sarah and her lover Fakkim Epps (a Former Muslim warrior) must make there way across an almost unrecognizable U.S. as they avoid and then clash with a demoniac assassin sent to kill them. The setting of a futuristic America are brilliantly described with plenty of cool details, and the violent action is non stop! Top this off with a controversial plot and you have something beyond the ordinary thriller! If you are looking for something different you have it here.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Skip Past the Premise May 28 2007
By Dan Ronco - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Here's the essential problem --- the foundation of the story isn't believable. Ferrigno bases his plot on the idea that the world believes that a nuclear attack on New York City, Washington, DC and Mecca in 2015 is the work of Israeli agents. As a result, most of the USA converts to Islam, with a group of the southern states breaking away to form a Christian nation.

It doesn't ring true. A novelist, particularly someone writing speculative fiction, asks his readers to suspend disbelief, but he has to present a realistic premise. Why would anyone believe that Israel, which depends on America for its survival, would attack US cities and then throw in Mecca for good measure? And even if you believed Israelis were responsible for the attack, why would you lose your faith and convert to Islam?

Nevertheless, I ignored this ridiculous concept and kept reading. The action is set in 2040. Sarah Dougan, a respected historian, isn't convinced it was an Israeli attack, so she begins to dig into the story. When the Old One, the mysterious Muslin actually responsible for the attack, learns of Sarah's investigation, he hires Darwin, a deadly [...], to take care of Sarah. With the assistance of Rakkim Epps, her secret lover, Sarah races to uncover the true terrorist while Darwin murders just about everyone she contacts.

Once I pushed aside the premise, I found a gripping thriller that kept my interest. Ferrigno should be commended for a balanced portrayal of Islam; even depicting Sarah and Rakkim as moderate Muslims.

Overall, Prayers for the [...] is a pretty good near-future thriller.

Dan Ronco is the author of Unholy Domain and PeaceMaker.


Feedback