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Precision Heart Rate Training [Paperback]

Edmund R. Burke
3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 25.95
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Book Description

March 11 1998


Over the past 20 years, heart rate monitors (HRMs) have
gained widespread popularity among fitness enthusiasts and elite athletes. These wireless devices monitor the body's levels of cardiovascular and physiological stress during exercise, so users can adjust their training intensity for the safest, most effective workouts.

While more people are buying HRMs, few know how to maximize their use. Precision Heart Rate Training is the best, most complete resource for anyone who wants to use an HRM to get optimal results. Written by prominent authorities from a variety of sports and fitness activities and backed by Polar Electro, the leading manufacturer of HRMs, Precision Heart Rate Training fully explains why and how to train with a heart rate monitor.

Editor Edmund R. Burke, a former Olympic coach who began working with HRMs in 1983, introduces the basic concepts of heart rate training. He explains how various factors affect heart rate during exercise, then presents several methods for establishing target heart rates.

Burke also introduces the concept of training zones, or ways of describing training intensity, ranging from very light activity to training for improved performance. Using these zones as a framework, an all-star panel of experts explains how to design and use training programs for seven different sports and fitness activities:

- Walking - Therese Iknoian
- Running - Roy Benson
- Cycling - Joe Friel
- In-line Skating - Frank Fedel
- Multisport Training - Tim Moore
- Circuit Training - Wayne Westcott
- Group Exercise - Jay Blahnik

Each chapter contains training suggestions specific to the activity described, including how to find the optimal training intensity, design an effective training program, and adjust workout intensity, plus sample workouts or programs, or both.

For those who want to develop an effective long-term training plan, Jim Dotter, founder of Biometrics, Inc., provides guidelines for setting up a measurable training system using HRMs and explains how to adjust the plan through the season.

With HRMs, athletes and exercisers at every level can use high-tech biofeedback training to develop sophisticated programs for better performance. Precision Heart Rate Training shows them how to use today's training technology to their fullest advantage.


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Product Description

Review

""""Heart rate training for me has made the difference between being overtrained and being ready to run on race day. My heart rate monitor helps me gauge my training intensity, making sure I'm going hard on hard days and easy on recovery or long days. It's been the key addition to my training program that I wish I'd had in the early days of my career."""Steve ScottWorld-Class Miler """In my nine years of training and racing with a heart rate monitor, I have come to realize the importance of maintaining a precise level of intensity in my workouts. The heart rate monitor is the only way that I can gauge that intensity and learn more about my body during exercise. I owe my racing success to training at the right intensity level and to my heart rate monitor."""Alison SydorVolvo/Cannondale TeamWorld Champion Mountain Bike Racer "

Review

"


""Heart rate training for me has made the difference between being overtrained and being ready to run on race day. My heart rate monitor helps me gauge my training intensity, making sure I'm going hard on hard days and easy on recovery or long days. It's been the key addition to my training program that I wish I'd had in the early days of my career.""
Steve Scott
World-Class Miler

""In my nine years of training and racing with a heart rate monitor, I have come to realize the importance of maintaining a precise level of intensity in my workouts. The heart rate monitor is the only way that I can gauge that intensity and learn more about my body during exercise. I owe my racing success to training at the right intensity level and to my heart rate monitor.""
Alison Sydor
Volvo/Cannondale Team
World Champion Mountain Bike Racer

"

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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
2.0 out of 5 stars Feeble Heart Rate Training March 4 2000
Format:Paperback
This book tries to do too much: it wants to be a heart rate training book AND a book about training for sporting events. The book is only 200 pages...get the picture? The book provides cursory information on training for various sports: walking, running, cycling, in-line skating, and triathlon. Obviously, if you really wanted to learn how to train competitively for these sports, this ISN'T the book for you. If you're looking for a book that tells you how to create a workout you can do at a health club on a stair-climbing machine or elliptical trainer, etc....this is NOT the book for you. Sure, there's a chapter on "group" exercise (i.e. aerobic class), but it FAR from practical. The introductory chapters merely delineate the heart zones rather than offering suggestions for combining them meaningfully or providing progressive programs. The book simply tries to cover too much in order to increase its market.
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Format:Paperback
Given some of the less-than-favourable reviews here I thought I was going to find an average, if not hum-drum book. I was very pleasantly surprised! This is a great book, very detailed with good descriptions of the Karvonon method of calculating HRR (Heart Rate Reserve) and its correlation to VO2 Max and Net VO2 and how to use this information to determine appropriate training zones. It had some good sections on various other fitness activities (such as cycling, swimming and walking) and serves as a good resource for anyone wanting to get fit faster while lowering your chances of injury or overtrainig.
I think if you combined this book with "Heart Rate Monitor Training for the Compleat Idiot" you'd posses all the information you'd ever need to train to maximum effectiveness with your heart rate monitor.
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Format:Paperback
I do inline skating, skiing, and weight training, but every time I tried to take up running, I would hit a wall. I just couldn't run for long sessions, and after a few I would hurt something and give up. Then I read about Ed Burke in Outside. This book, along with Burke's "Optimal Muscle Recovery" (I tore an Achilles tendon and developed plantar fascitis from skating and skiing) and "Stretching" finally got me to understand that I wasn't building the base I needed in order to run better. By following the training programs in this book, I've greatly increased my capacity without injury, and am slowly seeing my speed increase. Also liked this book because it took a different approach for each covered sport, and it treated inline skating with the respect it deserves as an endurance activity.
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2.0 out of 5 stars A traumatolgist...Part II March 31 2000
Format:Paperback
I think that George's point is that calling yourself a "tramatologist" doesn't mean a thing. I study trauma too...but that doesn't make my review of a heart-rate training book any more valid. My review was based on facts. The book isn't that great...for the reasons I gave. I can even be more specific about my reasons. Note: saying it is "fun" and "informative" means absolutely nothing...just like saying, "I'm a tramatolgist." (sic) And that would be...a MD? PhD? BA? A mail-order degree? Think about it... The book isn't terrible and I'd recommend going to the library to check it out if you're looking for a cursory introduction to heart-rate training...but I wouldn't buy it. By the way, Sally's book isn't that good either.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Why is this a great book? March 20 2000
Format:Paperback
It is interesting to note that the "reader" from Telluride, Colorado does not list any reasons "why" this is a great book. In fact, no one does! Why? The book is not that good! Ed makes learning fun? Please... An article in a fitness magazine provides as much "fun" information! Also, just because someone claims to be traumatologist (whatever that means!) and endorses the book, it doesn't make it any more legitimate. If it's so "great" why doesn't anyone give any reasons why? Hmm...I'm not against Burke & I'm not against Polar...I am for honest, fair reviews based ON fact. An honest review? This book is simply okay.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Wandering, without meat March 9 1999
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
The first chapters could be used for POLAR promotional material. They are repetitive, sale-sy and without any real substance. The contributions by other authors are better, and they do offer some good introductory material for the person interested in fitness training, but little to help in setting up a program, goals, methods, etc. The final discussions about software presents a list of criteria for good software, but no contacts, no list of products or companies, no web page URLs. The reason this book is not a one star book, is because of the multiple authors and perspectives that round out and give a little credibility to the message.
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2.0 out of 5 stars The book had some good information May 28 2001
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
I had bought the book to help me with Mtn. bike training and my son with running. The book didn't provide information for mtn. biking though it did have a section on road biking. The running chapter seemed incomplete. The major table that was supposed to explain the heart rate targets was not explained fully. Also, oddly, there is a quote in there that is identical in two chapters but attritubted to two different people!
In summary, I was disappointed with the book but it may be helpful to someone else.
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