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The Princess Bride (Special Edition) (Sous-titres français) [Import]

4.7 out of 5 stars 729 customer reviews

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  • The Princess Bride (Special Edition) (Sous-titres français) [Import]
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Product Details

  • Actors: Cary Elwes, Mandy Patinkin, Robin Wright, Chris Sarandon, Christopher Guest
  • Directors: Rob Reiner
  • Writers: William Goldman
  • Producers: Rob Reiner, Andrew Scheinman, Jeffrey Stott, Norman Lear, Steve Nicolaides
  • Format: Anamorphic, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, DVD-Video, Special Edition, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English, Spanish
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: Unknown
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: PG
  • Studio: Sony Music Canada Inc.
  • Release Date: Sept. 4 2001
  • Run Time: 98 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 729 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B00005LOKQ
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Product Description

Product Description

Previously Enjoyed & Fully Guaranteed

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Screenwriter William Goldman's novel The Princess Bride earned its own loyal audience on the strength of its narrative voice and its gently satirical, hyperbolic spin on swashbuckled adventure that seemed almost purely literary. For all its derring-do and vivid over-the-top characters, the book's joy was dictated as much by the deadpan tone of its narrator and a winking acknowledgement of the clichés being sent up. Miraculously, director Rob Reiner and Goldman himself managed to visualize this romantic fable while keeping that external voice largely intact: using a storytelling framework, avuncular Grandpa (Peter Falk) gradually seduces his skeptical grandson (Fred Savage) into the absurd, irresistible melodrama of the title story.

And what a story: a lowly stable boy, Westley (Cary Elwes), pledges his love to the beautiful Buttercup (Robin Wright), only to be abducted and reportedly killed by pirates while Buttercup is betrothed to the evil Prince Humperdinck. Even as Buttercup herself is kidnapped by a giant, a scheming criminal mastermind, and a master Spanish swordsman, a mysterious masked pirate (could it be Westley?) follows in pursuit. As they sail toward the Cliffs of Insanity...

The wild and woolly arcs of the story, the sudden twists of fate, and, above all, the cartoon-scaled characters all work because of Goldman's very funny script, Reiner's confident direction, and a terrific cast. Elwes and Wright, both sporting their best English accents, juggle romantic fervor and physical slapstick effortlessly, while supporting roles boast Mandy Patinkin (the swordsman Inigo Montoya), Wallace Shawn (the incredulous schemer Vizzini), and Christopher Guest (evil Count Rugen) with brief but funny cameos from Billy Crystal, Carol Kane, and Peter Cook. --Sam Sutherland --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Unlike a lot of anniversary additions, this one does include some new content in the way of interviews and various other little extras. The movie is as great as it has always been and I think this is worth the purchase even if you have an earlier DVD release
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By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on Feb. 22 2007
Format: DVD
Every now and then, someone makes one of those rare movies that crosses the lines of romance, action, fantasy, fairy tale, and a story for all ages. And isn't annoying either. With snappy dialogue and lovable characters, "The Princess Bride" is a classic tale of high adventure, danger, true love, screaming eels, and Sicilians who talk too much. And yes, there's kissing.

A bored little boy (Fred Savage) is sick in bed, is told a story by his quirky grandfather (Peter Falk). In it, young lovers Buttercup (Robin Wright) and Westley (Carey Elwes) are separated when Westley is apparently killed. A few years later, the heartbroken Buttercup is unwillingly affianced to the slimy Prince Humperdinck. As if that weren't enough, she's kidnapped by a trio of mercenaries.

But things go wrong for the mercenaries -- a mysterious masked man is following them, and he defeats each of the mercenaries with his swordplay, strength and wits. He also knows quite a bit about Westley's fate -- and Buttercup soon finds that he IS Westley after all. But Buttercup is only a cog in Humperdinck's evil plot, and now it's up to Westley, gentle giant Fezzik (Andre) and vengeance-seeking Spaniard Inigo Montoya (Mandy Patinkin) to save her.

If "Princess Bride" had been done in a halfway serious manner, it wouldn't have been even remotely interesting. It would have been just another kids' film. But with William Goldman's tongue-in-cheek script and entertaining characters (Miracle Max, anyone?), it becomes something a lot sweeter and funnier.

Rob Reiner has a deft, wry touch that matches Goldman's story, and he does a superb job of keeping the grim moments lighter than they would have been otherwise ("We'll never make it through!" "Nonsense, you're only saying that because no one ever has").
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Format: DVD
There is always something new everytime I watch this movie...from the nuances in the dialog to the facial expressions to the obvious enjoyment everyone seems to be having in making the film. It's a fun film to watch and I am sure I'll watch it many more times.
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By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on Dec 29 2007
Format: DVD
Every now and then, someone makes one of those rare movies that crosses the lines of romance, action, fantasy, fairy tale, and a story for all ages. And isn't annoying either. With snappy dialogue and lovable characters, "The Princess Bride" is a classic tale of high adventure, danger, true love, screaming eels, and Sicilians who talk too much. And yes, there's kissing.

A bored little boy (Fred Savage) is sick in bed, is told a story by his quirky grandfather (Peter Falk). In it, young lovers Buttercup (Robin Wright) and Westley (Carey Elwes) are separated when Westley is apparently killed. A few years later, the heartbroken Buttercup is unwillingly affianced to the slimy Prince Humperdinck. As if that weren't enough, she's kidnapped by a trio of mercenaries.

But things go wrong for the mercenaries -- a mysterious masked man is following them, and he defeats each of the mercenaries with his swordplay, strength and wits. He also knows quite a bit about Westley's fate -- and Buttercup soon finds that he IS Westley after all. But Buttercup is only a cog in Humperdinck's evil plot, and now it's up to Westley, gentle giant Fezzik (Andre) and vengeance-seeking Spaniard Inigo Montoya (Mandy Patinkin) to save her.

If "Princess Bride" had been done in a halfway serious manner, it wouldn't have been even remotely interesting. It would have been just another kids' film. But with William Goldman's tongue-in-cheek script and entertaining characters (Miracle Max, anyone?), it becomes something a lot sweeter and funnier.

Rob Reiner has a deft, wry touch that matches Goldman's story, and he does a superb job of keeping the grim moments lighter than they would have been otherwise ("We'll never make it through!" "Nonsense, you're only saying that because no one ever has").
Read more ›
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By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on May 13 2003
Format: DVD
Does anyone NOT love this movie? Whenever the title of this movie is mentioned, there's always a chorus of people responding that it's one of their all-time favorites. "The Princess Bride" is a now-classic tongue-in-cheek fairy tale about adventure, danger, true love, and Sicilians who talk too much.
A bored little boy (Fred Savage) who is sick in bed, is told a story by his quirky grandfather (Peter Falk) -- a story of adventure, pirates, revenge, true love, giants and treachery. Westley, a clever stableboy (Carey Elwes) falls in love with the beautiful Buttercup (Robin Wright, in her first role), but is apparently killed when he goes to seek his fortune. Buttercup is heartbroken. But a few years later, she is unwillingly affianced to the charmingly evil Prince Humperdinck. One day, when riding, she is kidnapped by a trio of mercenaries who plan to start a war by blaming another kingdom for her death.
But things go wrong for the mercenaries -- a mysterious masked man is following them, and he knows quite a bit about Westley's fate. No sooner has Buttercup discovered that he actually IS Westley than Humperdinck brings his "princess bride" back to the castle. Westley, pleasant giant Fezzik, and a vengeance-seeking Spaniard Inigo Montoya (Mandy Patinkin) must find a way to rescue Buttercup and deal with Humperdinck.
Movies very, very rarely are as good as people say they will be. Usually you'll be let down. But "Princess Bride" is unique on its own -- rarely is there so much good acting, good scripting, good direction and such humor. What's more, like "Monty Python and the Holy Grail," it's also become a source of endless quotations -- lines like "Inconceivable!" "My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die," "I'm not left-handed!
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