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Principles of Network and System Administration [Paperback]

Mark Burgess
3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

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Paperback, July 17 2000 --  
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Book Description

July 17 2000 0471823031 978-0471823032
Principles of Network and System Administration focuses on the general principles involved in setting up configuring and maintaining computer communities. A robust discipline of System Administration is now coming of age and both academics and industry recognise the need to formalise the problems which system administrator's tackle. Amongst the challenges faced in planning and designing an efficient community of computers are:

* designing a network which is logical and efficient
* deploying large numbers of machines which can be easily upgraded later
* deciding what services are needed
* planning and implementing adequate security
* providing a comfortable environment for users
* developing ways of fixing errors and problems which occur
* keeping track of the enormous amount of ever increasing amount of information

Whilst providing practical illustrations of technical specifics through examples, Burgess steers away from the overwhelming details of specific operating systems. Trainee administrators and students alike need to understand a wealth of issues relating to heterogeneous environments before understanding the quirks of any one particular system. Moreover, this book teaches good practice for working in a global community of networked machines and organisations---which extends beyond being technically savvy to being professionally and ethically responsible.

Features:

* Broad coverage of Linux and other Unix versions, Windows, Macs and mainframes

* Practical - supplemented with reference section containing practical recipes and advice.

* Vendor/Platform independent view of the technical, theoretical, practical and social/ethical aspects to Systems Administration

* Strong pedagogy - end of chapter exercises plus teaching guide available from Website


Product Details


Product Description

Review

Another winner! I keep Nemeth et al. and AEleen Frisch at hand for referencing the systems admin tasks we all need to do. Burgess' fine book is something ``completely different.'' It is a well-articulated introduction to a corpus of guiding principles for systems administrators. And as we live in a world of heterogeneity, Burgess ``covers'' Unix, Unix-like, DOS, Windows, Mac, Amiga, and NT systems.

Burgess says that he wants to express a sound and logical way to approach networked systems. While I can find nits (that's a reviewers job, isn't it?), I consider this an important book. More and more talk of certification can only lead to a body of knowledge and a set of tenets that are 'required.'

I think that Burgess will become part of the required reading for future (and current) systems administrators. -- Peter Salus, Login - June 2000

Review

"Burgess' fine book...is a well-articulated introduction to a corpus of guiding principles for systems administrators...I consider this an important book...I think that Burgess will become part of the required reading for future (and current) system administrators." - Peter Salus, USENIX Association

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

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3.2 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Organization and Topics Good. Oct. 17 2002
Format:Paperback
Edited 11/22/02.
I bought this over a year ago and was not impressed, initially. However, I am re-reading it in light of new responsibilities, and I'm changing my opinion, slightly.
First of all, if you are a serious system administrator, you should own, read, and work to the principles outlined in this book.
With that said, there were two items that I felt detracted from the presentation.
First was, there was much text devoted to particular operating systems (both *nix and Windows). Whether you're dealing with Linux, Unix, or BeOS, it's the principles that matter, not the implementation.
The second was that cfEngine, a systems configuration engine, was used to demonstrate the principles. This works on Unix - and again, detracted from the overall presentation of the "Principles" in the title I bought it for.
So, bottom line, the book is worth a read. Spend some time working to understand and apply the principles in your environment. If you can implement some of the specifics of the author's techniques, that's all the better.
11/10/02 update: "The Practice of System and Network Administration" is in. Short verdict, it's worth the money.
Was this review helpful to you?
4.0 out of 5 stars Peter Salus, Login - June 2000 Nov. 29 2000
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Peter Salus, Login - June 2000 Another winner! I keep Nemeth et al. and AEleen Frisch at hand for referencing the systems admin tasks we all need to do. Burgess' fine book is something ``completely different.'' It is a well-articulated introduction to a corpus of guiding principles for systems administrators. And as we live in a world of heterogeneity, Burgess ``covers'' Unix, Unix-like, DOS, Windows, Mac, Amiga, and NT systems.
Burgess says that he wants to express a sound and logical way to approach networked systems. While I can find nits (that's a reviewers job, isn't it?), I consider this an important book. More and more talk of certification can only lead to a body of knowledge and a set of tenets that are 'required.'
I think that Burgess will become part of the required reading for future (and current) systems administrators.
Was this review helpful to you?
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
This work is a good one on the non-technical side of system adminsitration. It does not deal with stuff like HOW to install a system, but the WHYs, such as WHY you want to properly document your installations.
This sort of work has been needed for a long time, since "The Keys to Successful Unix System Management" went out of print. However, this work may be a bit too academic for many admins. They might find the recent "Practice of System and Network Administration" to be a bit better. If you can afford both, do so.
Was this review helpful to you?
1.0 out of 5 stars This guy is a complete ningkumpoop! Sept. 3 2001
Format:Paperback
This book is completely filled with nonsense. Did this guy ever take any classes or instruction on what is he writing about? What qualifications does he have? Spend you money on a real networking book from a qualified author.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.6 out of 5 stars  5 reviews
19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A pretty good work on the non-technical side of sysadmining Oct. 2 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This work is a good one on the non-technical side of system adminsitration. It does not deal with stuff like HOW to install a system, but the WHYs, such as WHY you want to properly document your installations.
This sort of work has been needed for a long time, since "The Keys to Successful Unix System Management" went out of print. However, this work may be a bit too academic for many admins. They might find the recent "Practice of System and Network Administration" to be a bit better. If you can afford both, do so.
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Organization and Topics Good. Oct. 17 2002
By Sojournalist - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Edited 11/22/02.
I bought this over a year ago and was not impressed, initially. However, I am re-reading it in light of new responsibilities, and I'm changing my opinion, slightly.
First of all, if you are a serious system administrator, you should own, read, and work to the principles outlined in this book.
With that said, there were two items that I felt detracted from the presentation.
First was, there was much text devoted to particular operating systems (both *nix and Windows). Whether you're dealing with Linux, Unix, or BeOS, it's the principles that matter, not the implementation.
The second was that cfEngine, a systems configuration engine, was used to demonstrate the principles. This works on Unix - and again, detracted from the overall presentation of the "Principles" in the title I bought it for.
So, bottom line, the book is worth a read. Spend some time working to understand and apply the principles in your environment. If you can implement some of the specifics of the author's techniques, that's all the better.
11/10/02 update: "The Practice of System and Network Administration" is in. Short verdict, it's worth the money.
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Peter Salus, Login - June 2000 Nov. 29 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Peter Salus, Login - June 2000 Another winner! I keep Nemeth et al. and AEleen Frisch at hand for referencing the systems admin tasks we all need to do. Burgess' fine book is something ``completely different.'' It is a well-articulated introduction to a corpus of guiding principles for systems administrators. And as we live in a world of heterogeneity, Burgess ``covers'' Unix, Unix-like, DOS, Windows, Mac, Amiga, and NT systems.
Burgess says that he wants to express a sound and logical way to approach networked systems. While I can find nits (that's a reviewers job, isn't it?), I consider this an important book. More and more talk of certification can only lead to a body of knowledge and a set of tenets that are 'required.'
I think that Burgess will become part of the required reading for future (and current) systems administrators.
5.0 out of 5 stars For My Son Jan. 15 2013
By Jill - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I had order this for my oldest son for Christmas...it was mailed out to me in time to give it to him. I was what he had wanted and he loved it. Thanks
4 of 82 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This guy is a complete ningkumpoop! Sept. 3 2001
By Debra Johnson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book is completely filled with nonsense. Did this guy ever take any classes or instruction on what is he writing about? What qualifications does he have? Spend you money on a real networking book from a qualified author.
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