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Producing Animation [Paperback]

Catherine Winder , Zahra Dowlatabadi , Tracey Miller-Zarneke
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
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Book Description

Aug. 11 2011

You have a useful library of books covering the tools, techniques and aesthetics of animation, but you've been asked to put your production and creative skills to the test to produce a theatrical feature film or to deliver 52 episodes of a television series with only 18 months in the schedule.

Producing Animation is your answer. Written by Catherine Winder and Zahra Dowlatabadi and edited by Tracey Miller-Zarneke, Producing Animation is a comprehensive guide to the production industry. Already a relied upon resource by professionals and students alike, this book covers the process from script to screen while defining the role of the producer at each phase. The second edition features new content such as sidebars on key topics from industry experts, discussions on CG, 2D and stereoscopic production processes, and an overview on marketing and distributing your project. The companion website provides access to sample tables, templates and workflow outlines for CG and 2D animation production.


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Review

"Producing Animation is an invaluable resource for students, executives, artists, and live action producers who may dream about producing an animated project. From preparing a pitch through final release print, everything you need to know about producing animation is discussed. Reading it is almost as if you had a mentor to guide you through the complex and often frustrating process of producing animation. If you are planning a project, this is an itemthat should be added to your budget and it is likely that you will be able to save many multiples of its cost in no time."--Pamela Kleibrink Thompson, TheScratchPost.com

"While there's a useful library of books covering the tools, techniques and aesthetics of animation, until now there's been scant coverage of the highly refined skill sets needed to produce animation. This up-to-date volume provides A to Z counsel about putting together a medium to large scale TV series or feature projects, with focus on cel and CGI animation genres. The writing is colloquial and peppered with authentic examples drawn from the adventures and misadventures of two experienced practitioners. There are hugely valuable tips for the smaller scale, independent writer/producer/animator who wants to develop his or her production chops."--Kit Laybourne, Head of Animation at Oxygen Media and author, The Animation Book

"Once in a while, we come across books that are helpful both for those who are just starting out in the toon business and professionals with lots of experience under their belts.  Winder and Dowlatabadi, who are seasoned veterans of the business, have put together a helpful primer based on their many years in the toon trenches..In short this is the book every animation producer in town should read before they make their next movie in 2012."--Animation Magazine December 2011/January 2012

From the Back Cover

You have a useful library of books covering the tools, techniques and aesthetics of animation, but you've been asked to put your production and creative skills to the test to produce a theatrical feature film or to deliver 52 episodes of a television series with only 18 months in the schedule.

Producing Animation is your answer. Written by Catherine Winder and Zahra Dowlatabadi and edited by Tracey Miller-Zarneke, Producing Animation is a comprehensive guide to the production industry. Already a relied upon resource by professionals and students alike, this book covers the process from script to screen while defining the role of the producer at each phase. The second edition features new content such as sidebars on key topics from industry experts, discussions on CG, 2D and stereoscopic production processes, and an overview on marketing and distributing your project. The companion website provides access to sample tables, templates and workflow outlines for CG and 2D animation production.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
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Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars An educational book Dec 26 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This book has some good points on how to produce your own animation. I have learned quite a bit from this book.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars  10 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book is the MISSING LINK Nov. 3 2011
By KWJ - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product
I've only recently come to the world of animation, and have devoured nearly every book on the subject, most of which have focused on the "how-to's" of drawing, etc.

But, I've haven't found anything that says, "Ok, so once you decide that you're going to create an animated film, and have your production tools and story in hand, here's how you make it happen." Until now. "Producing Animation" is the missing link in the evolution of books on the topic.

Other reviewers, most of them apparently animators and other creatives, take issue with the book's emphasis on production management and the life-long battle of the "creatives" vs. "the suits." I can completely understand that argument, and have seen it first hand in the live action film and television business. It's always been there, and it isn't about to change anytime soon.

What I found valuable about this book however, I found from the standpoint of someone who wants to be a one-man animation studio. Someone who is simultaneously the writer, the animator, the designer, as well as the director and producer. If I have any quarrels with management, I'll be quarreling with myself. (I'm the guy in the corner muttering to himself. Just leave me be, I'll be done in a minute :

For me, the valuable information here was in the practical how-to's of production and scheduling, the generous use of charts and forms, and the chapter on distribution and licensing. While some of it was much more applicable to a corporate environment where you have a team of managers supervising a team of animators, it still gave me a perspective on how to run an efficient production cycle, even if I'm the only one doing it.

I have no allusions of being the next Disney or Pixar, but I do have plans to produce quality animation now that the tools for doing so have created a level playing field for all who are interested in the art, and not just the big guys with the big bucks.

I consider this book a valuable tool for anyone who's either interested in hands-on animation production, or in the inner-workings of the business process.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential. PRODUCING ANIMATION, 2nd. Ed.: A Critical Review Oct. 11 2011
By Andre Lawrence - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product
A little less than a year ago, someone had written a book about working as a producer or working toward being a producer. My feeling then, as well as now, that there was very little substance.

Much of what I felt was missing is present in this book, PRODUCING ANIMATION. And, I think there's an easy distinction to be made and why this book is invaluable. A producer or anyone involved in "production" has the intimate responsibility of supplying funds, capital and/ or the talent. A producing agent does NOT tell (or shouldn't) the director or the artist how to employ their skill.

Inside this book as in these titles Directing the Documentary, Fifth Edition and The Complete Film Production Handbook, Fourth Edition, you have an explicit and comprehensive breakdown of a producing agents' responsibility. And, the distinction between this book and the other two books is that this book has several indispensable chapters on producing 2D and 3D films.

Book Highlights:

Ch. 2: THe Animation Producer
Ch. 3: How To Identify and Sell Projects
Ch. 5. The Development Process
Ch. 6. The Production Plan
Ch. 7. The Production Team
Ch. 9. Production
Ch. 10. Post Production
Ch. 11. Tracking Production
Ch. 12. Distribution, Marketing, Licensing & More

This is a great book to own, if your seriously considering entering the animation field.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars For PRODUCERS, not ANIMATORS Oct. 6 2011
By C.J. Hustwick - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product
I would be extremely frustrated if I were the authors reading the negative reviews about this book. Catherine Winder and Zahra Dowlatabadi have provided a comprehensive primer for the aspiring animation producer, covering many of the topics which this demanding profession encompasses.

The text explains the ins and outs of production plans, your core team, how to deal with overseas subcontractors, accounting, and how to manage the demanding animation pipeline that is prone to missed deadlines and quality control issues. If you've ever dreamed of making your own "King of the Hill" or even a "Jib Jab" short, I can highly recommend this book to set you off on the right foot. That does not mean you cannot also be an artist, but that topic is better served by another book.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not much help in breaking into the biz Aug. 24 2012
By Michael Demeritt - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product
This book falls into an area many of the genre falls into: It is not valuable enough for an experienced producer, and not helpful to a novice. There is some basic information that could prove useful, but can also be found on-line for free. There is little here to help you take your great idea and develop it. If you happen to fall in the narrow bandwidth it is aimed at, an accomplished producer of short animation but not long form who has been tasked to create long form animation, it may serve as a decent guidebook.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book on the business of animation April 12 2012
By Mark Simon - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Catherine and Zahra have written an invaluable look into what it takes to produce, budget and schedule a long form animation, whether it's a feature or a TV series. Both have amazing credits and this is a book that will help any producer. I've been producing animation for a long time and I still go through the book for ideas and inspiration. Thank you ladies.
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