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Production Design and Art Direction Paperback – Feb 1 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Focal Press; 1 edition (February 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0240804007
  • ISBN-13: 978-0240804002
  • Product Dimensions: 28 x 22.8 x 2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,438,759 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Henry Bumstead, who began his career in the Hollywood studio system, remains as active as ever today, his craftsmanship and artistry sought out by directors such as Clint Eastwood - for whom he has designed Joe Kidd (1972), High Plains Drifter (1973), Unforgiven (1991), Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil (1997), True Crimes (1999) and Space Cowboys (2000) - and Martin Scorsese (Cape Fear, 1991). Read the first page
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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback
agreed with the below review, this book is short on a lot of things, but it's still an interesting read. i was going searching for ettedgui's cinematography book, when i found this instead and decided to pick it up. it's a quick, easy read, and there are some nice anecdotes, but there is a lot of information lacking. lots of name-dropping from designers on who they love and by the author on who helped him out. if you're a design buff, i'd recommend the book on the level of hearing from some of the master of the trade. if you're looking for information, i'd say take it elsewhere. this is the least educational book on movies i've come into reading, but i'm not complaining because it's also the easiest to read (the others were practically tech manuals).
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Format: Paperback
Texts on Production Design are just plain fun to read. When I received this text I looked with great anticipation at the big white space and contemporary layout on the cover. Turning that first page, and the second page, and third to see more, and more, white space, accompanied by extremely small print and small reproductions of rare conceptual drawings, storyboards, photos and architectual drawings from films designed by 16 masters of their craft, was a disappointment.
Compared to books like "Hollywood: Legend and Reality" Edited by Michael Webb, from the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, which also had rarely seen drawings and photos, the visual layout and design lacked impact and clarity. Print within the storyboards, often important clues to how the scene was shot, is hard to read.
Ettedgui's beautiful book is an illustrated interview book, but the interviews prove anecdotal more than educational.
Compared to the Text: "Film Design", compiled by Terence St. John Marner, part of The London Film School Series, 1974, the explanation of how production design was technically done on individual films was meager.
In "By Design, Interviews with Film Production Designers", LoBrutto knows what questions to ask in interviews with 20 masters of their craft to relay meaningful information about how the film industry, as well as these designers, work. Ettedgui's work cannot compare in content to LoBrutto's.
As an independent reviewer, I review books on the filmmaking craft for what they can help you learn about the craft on your own. This is a beautiful book.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
36 of 37 people found the following review helpful
20/20 Eyesight please: White is for Weddings and not pages! July 7 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Texts on Production Design are just plain fun to read. When I received this text I looked with great anticipation at the big white space and contemporary layout on the cover. Turning that first page, and the second page, and third to see more, and more, white space, accompanied by extremely small print and small reproductions of rare conceptual drawings, storyboards, photos and architectual drawings from films designed by 16 masters of their craft, was a disappointment.
Compared to books like "Hollywood: Legend and Reality" Edited by Michael Webb, from the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, which also had rarely seen drawings and photos, the visual layout and design lacked impact and clarity. Print within the storyboards, often important clues to how the scene was shot, is hard to read.
Ettedgui's beautiful book is an illustrated interview book, but the interviews prove anecdotal more than educational.
Compared to the Text: "Film Design", compiled by Terence St. John Marner, part of The London Film School Series, 1974, the explanation of how production design was technically done on individual films was meager.
In "By Design, Interviews with Film Production Designers", LoBrutto knows what questions to ask in interviews with 20 masters of their craft to relay meaningful information about how the film industry, as well as these designers, work. Ettedgui's work cannot compare in content to LoBrutto's.
As an independent reviewer, I review books on the filmmaking craft for what they can help you learn about the craft on your own. This is a beautiful book. If your eyesight is 20/20 or better you might not even mind the small print, but once past the intial oh-oh, ah-ah of the size, design and layout of this large text, the content rates not much more than 3 Stars.
Pamela Jean Curry, Film Director in Training at Film Studio Faux,Parody of Motion Picture Film Studio Training.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
not the best but not the worst Aug. 27 2001
By Joshua Feibus - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
agreed with the below review, this book is short on a lot of things, but it's still an interesting read. i was going searching for ettedgui's cinematography book, when i found this instead and decided to pick it up. it's a quick, easy read, and there are some nice anecdotes, but there is a lot of information lacking. lots of name-dropping from designers on who they love and by the author on who helped him out. if you're a design buff, i'd recommend the book on the level of hearing from some of the master of the trade. if you're looking for information, i'd say take it elsewhere. this is the least educational book on movies i've come into reading, but i'm not complaining because it's also the easiest to read (the others were practically tech manuals).
Beautiful and interesting book Feb. 23 2005
By D. Rahmel - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
In this wonderful book, the author introduces some known and not-so well known production designers and art directors. The book presents beautifully rendered photographs of many production drawings and final sets. Seeing the progress from set to screen is fascinating. This book is anecdotal rather the encyclopedic and is excellent in presentation. My favorite sections were the ones on Ken Adam and Richard Selbert.

Ken Adam designed most of the sets for the early Bond films (Goldfinger, Dr. No, Thunderball, etc.) as well as the amazing sets for Dr. Stangelove and Barry Lyndon. He has a great anecdote on how he and Kubrick came up with the war room (and a funny little aside about Ronald Reagan's request upon taking office).

Richard Sylbert is a legend himself with Production Designer credits for such classics as The Manchurian Candidate, The Graduate, Catch-22, Chinatown, Rosemary's Baby, Reds, Carlito's Way, and on and on. For Chinatown, he explains how he layered the idea of water through the various sets and even the glasswork. He also talks about he had sets mirror other sets to provide subtle associations such as between the Department of Water and Power and the morgue.

I also really enjoyed the John Beard section on how he came up with some of the designs for Terry Gilliam's Brazil. Many other production designers are featured including Henry Bumstead, Dante Ferretti, Dean Tavoularis, Stuart Craig, Patrizia von Brandenstein, Allen Starski, Dan Weil, and Nigel Phelps.

The very high quality paper and print quality gives the book a coffee-table book feel. It's a pleasure just to page through it and view the different concepts of movie production design. If you've ever worked in the Art Department on a film or plan to work in a movie art department, be sure to add this to your collection. I would highly recommend it.

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