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Professional iPhone and iPad Database Application Programming Paperback – Oct 26 2010


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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
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Amazon.com: 13 reviews
31 of 32 people found the following review helpful
EXACTLY what I needed! Feb. 8 2011
By Mike McG - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm a 20 year veteran of Microsoft programming with a good grasp of OOP. I recently started learning iOS development, and after a brief intro to Objective-C I was ready to dive in to some business app coding. Unfortunately, the books I had purchased so far (though very good) didn't give me what I really needed, a real here's-how-you-do-it book on data-enabled apps.

With only a couple reviews of this book available, I was a little hesitant, but the specific nature of the title piqued my interest so I pulled the trigger, and am really glad I did.

Right out of the gate, you're building a basic catalog application. This is how I like to learn - by example. At every step, Mr. Alessi explains what you're doing and why, and in the course of building the first sample app, I gained a greater understanding of MVC than I had after several other texts.

By Chapter 3, you will have a solid foundation for building SQLite-based data-centric apps. Further into the book, you will be able to dress up your screens, and interact with the user and data however you want to. Even though the book states that certain skills/familiarities are required, I found the text to be extremely approachable, with explanations of code that may seem elementary to some, but I welcomed it whole-heartedly as I continue to learn iOS development.

This book may not be for everyone, but if you have a basic grasp of iOS development and Obj-C and need to get a database driven application built, you have everything you need right here.

From my perspective and for my needs, it is a no-brainer to give this book 5 stars.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
good book Dec 10 2010
By K. Addaquay - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
i really like this book. its teaching me a great deal about working with sqlite and ios devices in a way that the other books haven't taught me. It touches on core data and working with web services as well. I am not giving a 5 on this only because i was hoping to get lots of information working with json, but didn't. Apart from that it does a marvelous job at explaining various and PROPER(mvc) ways of integration data into your applications.
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
I keep going back - good Core Data foundation reference Dec 31 2010
By Bham Jack - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have used this book in two ways:

First I fast read from beginning to end skimming or skipping chapters of less immediate interest (I am working on a project using core data first on Cocoa - later on components for iPhone / iPad). I skimmed Part I (iDevs & SQLlite) to focus on Part II: Core Data. This was very helpful in getting a good overview of the Core Data model and in thinking through basic db design issues.

Later, as I have become enmeshed in the development cycle, I find myself returning before tackling each coding task that relates to the data model. I have found that taking this timeout after each block of programming, reading relevant sections again, has greatly increased my productivity and enhanced my knowledge at each step. The book is well organized so it is easy to find info relevant to tasks at hand and a 2nd reading (sometimes 3rd) after more actual experience is almost like getting a new book since information that kind of filled the background on a 1st read jumps out screaming 'oh yeah, I better take note of that".

My hat is off to this author, especially given the derth of useful Core Data references.
13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Worth every penny Oct. 19 2010
By SP2010iOS - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
There are many excellent iPhone/iPad books out there but this title stands out because it delivers on what it is says it will do, teach data access on the device. Solid book.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Especially good for experienced programmer Oct. 20 2011
By Wing Kuen Lee - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Any experienced software developer that has mastered at least one programming language should like reading this book.

If you want to have deeper understanding on using table view and data persistence, this book is recommended.

But this book is not for people who don't have programming experience at all.

It starts by introducing the most essential code that does the most fundamental task, then build up the complexity. So you don't need to read much before you can quick start writing a table view like an iOS expert. After reading Chapter 1 and half of the Chapter 2 I get how to use a table to display data in from the local database. After Chapter 3 I get the navigation controller mechanism and know how to customize table cell.

Its writing style is appropriate. The statement is clear and direct. Every sentence is relevant to the content, no non-sense talk (experienced programmers don't need non-sense talk. Just show us how iOS work). The passage is fluid. The organization is good. It begins with the essential code first, then explain the mechanism while showing how to add more features, why it was written this way, alternatives, and pitfalls. It is especially crucial when it involves GUI libraries. MFC is different from Swing which is different from Cocoa. This is unlike the iOS technical document (or some other books on iOS) that talk a lot about the UI class in word, then assume that I have understood the basic, and suddenly show me a piece of code fragment with complex features.


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