Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
or
Amazon Prime Free Trial required. Sign up when you check out. Learn More
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Tell the Publisher!
I'd like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Programming a Multiplayer FPS in DirectX [Paperback]

Vaughan Young
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 61.95
Price: CDN$ 60.76 & FREE Shipping. Details
You Save: CDN$ 1.19 (2%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Want it delivered Tuesday, April 22? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout.

Book Description

Dec 20 2004 Charles River Media Game Development
If you have experience with C++ and DirectX and have always wanted to program your own game, this is the book for you. Programming a Multiplayer FPS in DirectX takes you from the basic game design to a fully functioning game! All of the source code, assets, and tools are included- you just work through the tutorial-based chapters and watch the game come to life as you develop it. And as new features are added, you can begin playing with them to see them in action. Following a typical game development process, the book is separated into two distinct parts: Part One focuses on the design and development of the game engine, and Part Two concentrates on putting the game together using the engine. The theory has been kept to a minimum, so that you are following a hands-on approach and adding new functionality to your engine as you proceed. In the first part, you'll learn about the many facets of DirectX, C++, and object-oriented programming. You'll also learn how to design the engine and put the infrastructure into place. The next chapters will each add a new module to your engine including input, scripting, 3D rendering, sound, networking, and scene management. The second part covers the final development stages, including everything from game play to player management; it culminates with the complete multiplayer FPS game. Throughout the book you'll learn key topics that will bring you up to speed with industry proven techniques, while improving your confidence as a developer. And because DirectX is the most prevalent game development tool available, once you master this project, you'll have the skills you need to create a variety of games!

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Product Description

Review

PART I THE ENGINE 1 1 Engine Design 2 Framework 3 Engine Control 4 Scripting 5 Rendering 6 Sound 7 Networking 8 Materials and Meshes 9 Objects 10 Scene Management PART II THE GAME 389 11 Foundations 12 Players 13 Weapons Appendix A: About the CD-ROM Appendix B: Competition

About the Author

VAUGHAN YOUNG (Queensland, Australia) is an experienced C++ and DirectX programmer. His degree in IT is complemented by further studies in software development, focusing primarily on game development. Currently, he operates his own software development business, producing and managing software solutions.

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars thanks July 30 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
this is a good read so far and the programming is a nice read I will be getting more books for video games on all fronts if you have some send me an e-mail @ roch720@gmail.com thank you.
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Top Notch Code Feb. 16 2005
By Jason
Format:Paperback
I'm about half way through the book now and the code that comes with the book is top notch. I even heard the author saying he went through all of the code removing the error checking before releasing as to make it easier to read. Its well maintained, simple and clever. The code is also definitly encapsulated well so you can bring it to other projects easily if you'd like with little dependencies.
Warning to those who are intermediate directx users - the first 2-7 are mostly directx basics and you will most likely skip this to get to the meat.
Although there's nothing incredibly complicated in this book, I think it gave me a healthy dose of not over estimating myself. The author only spends time on the what is required to complete the project and reuses his code a lot (i think the initial linked list was reused about 100 times in total) So if you ever find yourself making projects that always fail half way through - this is a good book for you.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.2 out of 5 stars  17 reviews
27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Introduction April 4 2005
By P. H. Mason - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
When I first found out about this book I thought it had a snowball's change in hell of being even a half decent book (being a pretty ambitious topic). I've changed my mind after actually reading the book, and found it to be an excellent introduction to writing a FPS game engine. Granted, it's not DOOM3 but the end result is a simple, complete working engine; which is quite an achievement in my opinion.

One caveat though, even though the book is fairly simple and not exactly taxing (a tribute to the author) it is certainly not a beginners book. You should already be fairly comfortable with C++ and DirectX 9 to get the most out of it and be prepared to study the source and MSDN documentation (a good habit to get into anyway).

The book covers most of the major parts of a FPS engine at a reasonable level, resulting in a well designed, modular engine that can be expanded on quite easily. The main value of the book, however, is the design of the engine which should help a lot in developing your own engine (since most books cover the therory in exhausting detail but ignore the overall engine design - if you're looking for detail, this may not be the book for you).

After reading this book, the following books may be useful:

1. Introduction to 3D Game Programming with DirectX 9.0 (excellent intro to DX9).

2. 3D Game Engine Architecture : Engineering Real-Time Applications with Wild Magic (nice and detailed - I recommend all David Eberly's books).

3. Real-Time Rendering (doesn't get better than this).

4. Game Programming Gems (buy all of them, now).
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Top Notch Code Feb. 16 2005
By Jason - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I'm about half way through the book now and the code that comes with the book is top notch. I even heard the author saying he went through all of the code removing the error checking before releasing as to make it easier to read. Its well maintained, simple and clever. The code is also definitly encapsulated well so you can bring it to other projects easily if you'd like with little dependencies.
Warning to those who are intermediate directx users - the first 2-7 are mostly directx basics and you will most likely skip this to get to the meat.
Although there's nothing incredibly complicated in this book, I think it gave me a healthy dose of not over estimating myself. The author only spends time on the what is required to complete the project and reuses his code a lot (i think the initial linked list was reused about 100 times in total) So if you ever find yourself making projects that always fail half way through - this is a good book for you.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars First Person Shooter Using DirectX 9 July 19 2005
By Stuart Pennington - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
At last, a book on 3D gaming that isn't an excuse for re-iterating the DirectX SDK/Help docs.

Yes, it's the real deal.

I'm sure that anyone with an interest in this subject will know that it isn't for the faint hearted.

If you want to "understand the code" and not simply use the complete project for your own levels, you certainly have your work cut out.

That said, the author takes you on a well guided and informative tour of all the aspects required to create an "outdoor" multiplayer (LAN) shooter.

A great introduction to what really goes into it all.

Recommended.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book, with only minor failings Nov. 8 2005
By Michael C. Sikora - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The book is true to its title. It takes you through the complete development of a First Person Shooter game. The final game is simple, and the entire project is approximately 10 000 lines of C++ code, but it does illustrate almost all the required functionality.

I have two, and only two, minor criticisms of the book. The first is that the actual English writing of the book is sometimes poor. Sentences are grammatically correct, but sometimes fail to be natural. Analogies are very basic, and sometimes incorrectly applied. In fairness, the author sticks to simple English most of the time, so the discussions are fairly clear. The book would be more readable if the author were a better writer. I consider this a fair criticism, since some technical books do have good writing.

My second criticism is that the book fails to cover a few fundamental topics in greater detail. Specifically, these topics include collision detection, animation, and physics. The author includes an article about collision detection on the CD, but this does not make up for the lack of discussion in the book. Animation is so fundamental to almost any 3D game that it should have had more pages dedicated to it. Quite frankly, the author should have used the pages that were used for explanations of C++ topics (such as templates) to cover advanced animation material. I can forgive the missing physics material because it is such a vast topic, and any detailed discussion would have added hundreds of pages. In fairness to the book, it is a testament to the quality of the book that it is only 500 pages long.

If you are a competent programmer, and you have some experience with DirectX, this book delivers on its promises.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting book; good analysis July 23 2007
By Tor Helmer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
At my school we used this book for our networking class. (I had been begging our teacher to show us some directPlay stuff... yes, I'm aware that directPlay is ugh in terms of networking, but, it was a lot better than learning some java networking stuff. At least to me).

This book was an invaluable tool for designing my networking system. I basically gutted this networking system and stacked on some variable size packets that I studied from one of the Lamothe (actual author:Todd Baron ) books. (weird book, guy talks about his exploits in ultimate online for like, almost a chapter before he goes on to explain about how you can hack the networking system for exploits.

This book shows you how to implement a peer to peer network and then treat it like a server/client system. It's an interesting (I chose to just go strictly peer-to-peer in my system) approach. And I read in one of the Game Programming Gems a way to bypass some of the connectivity issues with peer to peer networks.

Regardless, this book is an EXCELLENT study of networking for games. I read the networking chapter probably 20x during our project and it took me quite a while to figure out exactly what he was doing with it. In the end, it's a logical system that works fairly decently.

We didn't use the rest of the code in the book too much. Some of the other people in my class modified the FPS game to do other things (made a shooting gallery, other's made some text based games on the networking code, etc).

The source code is useful and there is an update available for it (his precious linked list had a memory leak in it... he really harps on about it).

If you have never designed a game system before. This book is going to be a tremendous help. It teaches a bit about design patterns without all the unnecessary mumbo-jumbo, and how they directly relate to game programming and how they're useful (helloooo singleton).

The code is in visual studio 6 I believe, and you have to set the default project to the actual project and not the engine to get it to run. Also, if your hardware doesn't support hardware vertex buffers (you have integrated graphics, we had a couple people on the team with this issue) you have to change one of the directX intializers to something else to account for this (can't remember the call now, look at some other directX init calls from somewhere else and you can find it).

He goes into quite a bit of detail about each topic and the basics, and then delves down into the design of each system. It's very methodical and well thought out. AND YOU GET SOMETHING WORKING AT THE END!

Do not get this book if:
You are new to C++(you better have a CRYSTAL clear understanding of pointers and OOP, classes etc).

You are not interested in engine design.

You hate directX, or directPlay.

You hate max; he uses 3dsMax to make the scene files etc.

You are an industry professional that has a basic understanding of how a game engine works. This is definitely a n00b book.

You expect to get your hand completely held at each step. He does skip over some details that are easily discovered if you delve a little into the MSDN or any other online resource.

Get this book if:
You are incredibly interesting in engine design and want to get your feet wet; as well as learn some engine design in the process.

You're interested in any of the systems this book covers ( I can really only attest to the networking system, and that he uses directPlay, which is in sunset mode).

Interested in basic modular programming and looking to expand the code in the book to meet your needs or to experiment with. It is an incredibly useful base to start with.

Are extremely comfortable in c++/directX and are interested in expanding your knowledge and it's applications into games.

Overall, the book was a good purchase and is an excellent stepping stone into engine design. It has been very useful in my future projects since I've used this book in my course work.
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews
ARRAY(0xb3692468)

Look for similar items by category


Feedback