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Psycho Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: I Books
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743459075
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743459075
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 8.3 x 16.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 118 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,211,008 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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First Sentence
NORMAN BATES heard the noise and a shock went through him. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
This was an interesting piece of late 50s pulp fiction that is not bad, and ordinarily would not have been really remarkable, except it was the basis for one of the greatest horror movies of all time. I know what you are thinking; but this is Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho"! Well, no it isn't. It is Robert Bloch's novel. The plot is the same as the movie; Marian Crane steals money from her boss, and runs away to be with her boyfriend. She ends up in a small rundown motel run by shy but odd Norman Bates (who is described as fat with glasses here). Well, the rest is history. The book is a little different in the level of violence that was in the book that was missing in the movie, and I thought that was pretty cool. The problem is that almost everyone in the world has seen the movie, so the end is kind of ruined. But it dose offer a little more insight into Norman; he likes books on voodo and hypnotism, as well as adult magazeens. He is a lot less sympathetic here than he was in the movie, but that is ok. It is a fast read, and it offers a little more insight into the movie.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
'Psycho' by Robert Bloch would most certainly be long forgotten and probably out of print if it weren't for its brilliant film adaptation. Actually it is one of those unusual cases where the film is actually better than the book; the film's screenwriter (Joseph Stephano) did a great job. So what does the book offer?
While all the major elements found in the film 'Psycho' are also in Robert Bloch's original novel I found the book to be relatively poorly written. Great premise with a not-so-good execution. For much better psychological/criminal character studies I recommend 'The Killer Inside Me' by Jim Thompson, or one of the many early works of Patricia Highsmith. Robert Bloch simply doesn't have the same literary strength, and the characterizations are fairly thin.
However it is very interesting to note key differences between the film and the book, and so I believe fans of Hitchcock's film will enjoy reading Robert Bloch's novel. At least it's a short read, the perfect sort of book to carry on business trip.
Bottom line: the book that spawned Norman Bates. Somewhat disappointing but most will find some reading enjoyment from it.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
After reading everyone else's reviews and seeing what mostly everyone else had to say, I want to agree that the film is better than the novel. But, I still loved the novel. I think the bet way to enjoy it is to put yourelf in the time frame. It's 1959, a time that when we look back on it we think of a better more peaceful time. And the people thought they were living basically in peace. Then word spreads the country of a small town man from Plainfield, Wisconsin, (a town you've probably never even heard of). A man who has killed 2 women and done horrendous things to them. A man who has dug up at least 9 graves at cemetarys in the area. You don't know all the facts, but you have heard rumors of cannibalism and other suh terrible things. You are disgusted and terrified, yet eager to know more. Then, Robert Bloch, a more or less unheard of author at the time writes a book and says it is based on the Gein case. You recognise the name Gein as the small town man from Plainfield, Wisconsin. Eager to get inside his head, you read Psycho. It gives you an insight into Ed Gein's head through the character of Norman Bates and this terrifies you. You did not think anyone could ever be *that* Psycho, and with everything that is going on, you know that it may not be just a book, but a reality. My point is, while, even though it is a good, fast, enjoyable read, it may not seem very terrifying to you. But If you think back to the time it was written, you may get a better perspective. If you are looking for a horror that reads fast, and just hppens to be true (except for the hotel and other fictional facts) read Psycho; if you are looking to be really truly scared, watch the movie. I recommend both.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
After seeing the movie for the second time I decided to read the book that inspired it. To be honest, I'd say that the movie is better overall. The book, however, is a dreadfully fast read. I could have finished it one sitting if it weren't for other chores--like cleaning the bathroom. Most impressive was how good the writing style was for 1959. It was one of the few TRUE page-turners that I've read. One thing that I didn't care about the book though was that Robert Bloch didn't handle things in chronological order like in the movie. For example: The part about the $40,000, car-switching, Mary's relationship with Sam, are only mentioned when Mary reminisces. I was also disappointed with how Sam tells how Norman Bates's mind works, instead of the psychiatrist. In short, this book is very well written and I probably would have liked it more if I'd read it first. One can easily see why it was made into a movie. So if this book is 5 stars, then I'd have to say that the movie is 6. But the book is still 5 stars.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Psycho is a great read, made even greater by the fact that the book is 40 years old! Extremely groundbreaking in the use of a pathology for the killer, it seems that Norman Bates is as much a household name in American culture as Ronald McDonald. The Alfred Hitchcock film version seems to have used the book for the script, with only minor deviations. A short read, it's impossible not to finish this in one sitting. While reading I took down four pages of quotations from this book, it's that good and inspiring. I do think this book could have been longer and bloodier provided it had been written 10-15 years later. The ending was great and overall the book was awesome. Reading it was like watching the Hitchcock version of the movie, and vice versa. A must read Horror novel. On a scale from 1-10 I'd rate this novel a 10, for its historical significance, the intensity of the story, the quote factor, and characterization.
Come on, everyone knows Norman Bates!
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