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Punch-Drunk Love (Superbit(TM), Special Edition) (Bilingual)


List Price: CDN$ 41.95
Price: CDN$ 6.84
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Punch-Drunk Love (Superbit(TM), Special Edition) (Bilingual) + Boogie Nights (Bilingual)
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Product Details

  • Actors: Adam Sandler, Emily Watson, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Jason Andrews, Don McManus
  • Directors: Paul Thomas Anderson
  • Writers: Paul Thomas Anderson
  • Producers: Paul Thomas Anderson, Daniel Lupi, Daniel P. Collins, JoAnne Sellar
  • Format: AC-3, Anamorphic, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, DTS Surround Sound, Dubbed, DVD-Video, Special Edition, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English, French
  • Subtitles: English, French
  • Dubbed: French
  • Subtitles for the Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Canadian Home Video Rating : Parental Guidance (PG)
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
  • Release Date: June 24 2003
  • Run Time: 95 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (243 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00000G02H
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #10,281 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Product Description

The Superbit titles utilize a special high bit rate digital encoding process which optimizes video quality while offering a choice of both DTS and Dolby Digital 5.1 audio. These titles have been produced by a team of Sony Pictures Digital Studios video, sound and mastering engineers and comes housed in a special package complete with a 4 page booklet that contains technical information on the Superbit process. By reallocating space on the disc normally used for value-added content, Superbit DVDs can be encoded at double their normal bit rate while maintaining full compatibility with the DVD video format.

Amazon.ca

Quatrième long métrage de Paul Thomas Anderson, Punch-Drunk Love se joue des codes de la comédie romantique. Surprenant et rafraîchissant, ce film a reçu le prix de la mise en scène au Festival de Cannes en 2002.

Barry Egan a un costume bleu, sept sœurs et un emploi. Mais sa vie change quand il décide de s’intéresser à un concours organisé par une marque de puddings permettant d’accumuler des kilomètres en avion. Il rencontre deux blondes : l’une, douce et romantique ; l’autre, prostituée et arnaqueuse.

Paul Thomas Anderson situe l’action en banlieue de Los Angeles, royaume des grandes surfaces et de la dépersonnalisation. Portrait d’un célibataire dépressif et violent, voire schizophrène, Punch-Drunk Love dresse aussi un noir tableau de notre société, où règnent la normalité et la banalité. Ce célibataire maladroit, c’est le loser, l’exemple parfait de ce qu’il ne faut pas faire pour réussir sa vie.

Misant sur le charisme d’Adam Sandler, une des stars du Saturday Night Live, et sur la très juste Emily Watson, Punch-Drunk Love bénéficie également d’une réalisation toute en finesse, oscillant entre un expressionnisme stylisé et l’univers en technicolor des comédies musicales. Malgré un happy end peut-être un peu facile, ce film original est un beau pied de nez au cinéma de papa, grincheux et cynique. --Helen Faradji


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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 9 2004
Format: VHS Tape
you should like this. "punch-drunk love" does for lonely guys what "Amelie" did for lonely gals. both films are about odd, introverted people. both try to show the world as seen by the protagonists: magical and dreamy for Amelie; sterile and nightmarish for Barry Eagan. both are charming and sweet love stories. and strangely, both involve the sex trade! each in its own odd way. pdl is a (slightly) funnier film, though.
each film also makes interesting use of a different spatial dimension. in A, the vertical dimension is very important - many things either fall (A's mother, the goldfish, etc) or are discovered on the ground (the treasure box, torn pictures, boyfriend, etc). in PDL, it's the dimension into the plane of the film that's important - think of the long driveway leading up Barry's shop, or the corridors in the apartment and hotel, or the aiport walkway, etc. it's no coincidence that Leana first emerges from the end of the long driveway, or that Barry runs through the the long apt corridors to steal his first kiss, or that the lovebirds first hold hands as they stroll through the winding halls in the hotel.
the screenplay was very well written, especially for Barry. the conversations were funny just because they are so accurate: this is just the way you'd imagine someone like Eagen would talk. hilarious.
a good film. well worth watching.
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Format: DVD
Paul Thomas Anderson is either hit or miss with me. I liked the Hard Eight, I loved Boogie Nights, but I really thought he lost his way with Magnolia. That isn't to say I can't recognize that he is immensely talented and I'm looking forward to seeing his latest film There Will be Blood. Punch-Drunk Love is a smaller movie about Barry Egan, a business owner who sells novelty items such as stylized toilet plungers. Everything about Barry Egan permeates with a kind of frustrating sadness. His seven older sisters constantly insult him and his life is consistently portrayed as minimalist and disassociated. He is a profoundly lonely man. His bizarre social behavior is awkward but at times spirals into both perversion as well as intensely violent fits of rage. All the while, he is portrayed as the film's protagonist. Anderson is especially delicate in making us understand his eccentricities as justifiable survival mechanisms within the paradigm of his uncomfortable past and nearly pathetic current life. Anderson is careful not to mock or exploit Egan for his faults.

Who could play such a unique and intriguing character? I have to admit, I'm a big fan of Adam Sandler's early comedies. Especially Billy Madison and I don't care who knows about it. I love the silly and stupid humor of Adam Sandler and I firmly believe it is what put him on the map. But he was just a character in those early films and besides those films really are just a series of comedy sketches. It would've made more sense if Billy Madison were placed into a CGI world, a cartoon, or a comic book in the first place. He continued to be silly all along but his characters always carried this dark side that wasn't easy to pinpoint among the poop jokes and slap-stick.
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Format: DVD
Right off, I want to say that I'm a huge fan of Paul Thomas Anderson. Boogie Nights and Magnolia are two of the best ensemble pieces I've ever seen. Needless to say, I was quite surprised when I heard that he'd done a small picture, a love story, and that it starred Adam Sandler. But that was only the beginning of the surprises, as I soon found out...
Sandler plays Barry Egan, a quiet, lonely guy who is experiencing a degree of emotional angst about life. He's trying to make his business prosper, dealing with seven nagging sisters (all of whom badger him relentlessly about life, love, etc...), and yet finds himself swinging from sobbing uncontrollably to abject rage from time to time, with no apparent reason. In a lonely moment, he indulges in a phone-sex scam with unfortunate consequences. He's also buying up lots of groceries in an attempt to gain a million free air miles and meanwhile, a romance is blossoming with Lena (Emily Watson), a friend of one of his sisters. With me so far?
The real beauty of this film is in its imagery and simplicity. Barry and Lena are imperfect people trying to connect in an imperfect world. Anderson gives an amazing amount of trust to the actors to portray these people honestly, and it works wonderfully. They are able to convey a universe of emotion with very few words, and the connection seems so real, so tangible, that just watching them is almost like falling in love. The use of music, always excellent in Anderson's films, is just as perfect here and I have to say, the scene in which Barry and Lena walk down a hotel hallway in Hawaii with the song Maui Chimes playing quietly in the background, as he takes her hand and the camera irises in on their hands as they round a corner is quite possibly the sweetest love scene I've never seen.
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Format: DVD
Punch-Drunk Love, Paul Thomas Anderson's fourth film is a reworking of Amelie for men instead of women. Yes, both films are about lonely, quirky, and socially neurotic people, but Amelie, ultimately, is a far more masterful interpretation of such a person than is this. Punch-Drunk Love's Barry Eagan is an idiosyncratic and quiet guy, but, despite what most might say, was not developed or humanized enough for the viewer to really feel for him or even understand him. Though he lets people walk all over him, this in itself doesn't mean he is very nice or humanistic: he is unable to admit anything about himself and lies to everyone he meets [including the girl he loves] so no one will know how crazy he is. And, instead of dealing with his problems rationally and intelligently, he threatens his enemies with his brute strength. Why is he like this? Well, the film would have you believe his incessant secrecy and catastrophic blow-ups are due to his mean sisters' taunting him [calling him "gay boy"--so scarring!], but the evil sisters are too overdrawn and over-villainized to feasibly accept full responsibility for Barry's social idiocy. In fact, they are so badly portrayed and inhuman that it is surprising that he even becomes exasperated with their antics at all--that is, you would think that after being around them his whole life he would have safeguarded himself against them and, by thirty, would unresponsively witness and endure through their brutality with a knowing indifference. Instead, he gets frightfully nasty [worse than they are]--smashing up windows and beating people with crowbars. Yeah, that is what happens when someone is mistreated their whole life. And the viewers disliking your hero, Paul Thomas Anderson, is what happens when you don't know people at all [but think you do].Read more ›
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