CDN$ 15.86
  • List Price: CDN$ 21.98
  • You Save: CDN$ 6.12 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Purple Cow: Transform Your Business by Being Remarkable Audio CD – Audiobook, Unabridged


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Audio CD, Audiobook, Unabridged
"Please retry"
CDN$ 15.86
CDN$ 11.91 CDN$ 14.70

Up to 90% Off Textbooks

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Your Coach Digital; Unabridged edition (Sept. 27 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1596597585
  • ISBN-13: 978-1596597587
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 2.5 x 15.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 68 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (112 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #244,980 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

The world is changing ever more rapidly, and the rules of marketing are no different, writes Godin, the field's reigning guru. The old ways-run-of-the-mill TV commercials, ads in the Wall Street Journal and so on-don't work like they used to, because such messages are so plentiful that consumers have tuned them out. This means you have to toss out everything you know and do something "remarkable" (the way a purple cow in a field of Guernseys would be remarkable) to have any effect at all, writes Godin (Permission Marketing; Unleashing the Ideavirus). He cites companies like HBO, Starbucks and JetBlue, all of which created new ways of doing old businesses and saw their brands sizzle as a result. Godin's style is punchy and irreverent, using short, sharp messages to drive his points home. As a result the book is fiery, but not entirely cohesive; at times it resembles a stream-of-consciousness monologue. Still, his wide-ranging advice-be outrageous, tell the truth, test the limits and never settle for just "very good"-is solid and timely.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Seth Godin is the author of seven books that have been bestsellers around the world and have been translated into more than fifteen languages. He's been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Fortune, Fast Company and Business Week. Godin was singled out by Successful Meetings Magazine as one of twenty-one top speakers for the twenty-first century. Before Small is the New Big, The Big Moo and All Marketers Are Liars, Godin wrote Free Prize Inside!, which Forbes picked as one of its books of the year (as did Fast Company). He is also the author of Purple Cow, the bestselling marketing book of the decade, and Permission Marketing.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
Marketers for years have talked about the five Ps of marketing. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By K. Sampanthar on May 9 2003
Format: Hardcover
Seth Godin's newest addition to his fold is an amazing exploration of how to market innovative ideas. A "Purple Cow" is something remarkable that people deem news worthy and are excited to talk about. It stands out in a sea of ordinary cows (moo!).
I have been reading many books recently on Word of Mouth marketing and Buzz, and Godin's Purple Cow fits nicely into any marketing plan for innovative products and services. Godin is a fan of new ideas, he has a passion for them, something he defines as "Otaku" (Otaku is a Japanese word that defines something that falls between an obsession and a hobby). Previously he has written about Idea Viruses (a.k.a. memes, ideas that spread from person to person) and permission marketing. His new theme ties in nicely with the ideas from both of those books.
In this book he summed up everything I had been reading about Word of Mouth and how to go about marketing a new innovation. I have been working on a new product and developing a business plan to start my next company. As soon as I read Godin's book I realized it crystallized everything that my product stood for. I took up his offer of purchasing 12 of his "Limited Edition" Purple Cow books that came in Purple Milk Cartons and I have been giving them away with my business plan, since it explains so succinctly what I am aiming for with my product.
Other books that complement this one are: The Anatomy of Buzz - Emanuel Rosen, Unleashing the Idea Virus - Seth Godin, Creating Customer Evangelists - Bill McConnell, Jackie Huba and The Tipping Point - Malcolm Gladwell.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By James Sadler on Jan. 14 2004
Format: Hardcover
This is a not highly originally book which is apparently using a gimmicky title and cover to make itself stand out. I'm not sure why because Seth Godin has written better books and it's not like he necessarily needs to go the gimmicky "look-at-me, look-at-me" route to sell books.
All Godin has done here is write a book on branding an positioning. Godin is trying very hard here to sell us on the idea that what he suggests is new and different and that the old ways of marketing do not work. Hate to tell him this, but talk to people who are genuinely out there fighting for customers in the marketplace and you find that the old ways still work quite well. P&G has managed to stay pretty successful (not that they don't have an occasional bump in the road) sticking to a tired-and-true marketing formula, as have many other companies.
This book is simply about product or service differentiation that attracts attention (as a purple cow in a field of brown ones would). It's not necessarily new and different, and some of his example s may well be flawed. For example, JetBlue is a marvelous success (and I wish that would come to our part of the country), but all they did was build on the Southwest Airlines template for success. JetBlue also had the marked advantage of being one of the best financed start-ups in airline history. I think their success is more the result of good management more than anything else. And for the most part, Godin seems to use examples of companies that are now well-established in the marketplace, e.g., Starbucks, HBO and Krispy Kreme. While I think he's use of JetBlue does not necessarily support his premise, at least it is a relatively new entity. Why did he not use more examples of newer companies?
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on Dec 17 2003
Format: Hardcover
I have never met this guy Seth Godin, but I know this guy. I have worked with and gone to school with people just like this Seth Character. They like to say provactive things like "Marketing is Dead" and come up with catch phrases (Sneezers) that seems to gain them immediate attention. However, when you start analyzing what has been written the realization quickly hits home that nothing has been said at all. Merely Vapor-ware or in this case Vapor-ideas.
For those of us who look back at that phrase and to the whole Dot.Com era and cringe at the foolishness of people who were trying to rewrite the rules of business with their gimmickry and catch phrases, I present you Purple Cow. For this book is to Marketing what the DotCom era was to Business, which is in a word a BUST.
I also like that fact that most of the people that praised the book on the back cover, were coincidentally the very same people that Seth praised in his book for having that special Purple Cow quality...(How about a catch phrase of my own)...I guess this book will appeal to some people, but I guess I am just Lactose intolerant...Ha
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Shashank Tripathi on June 12 2003
Format: Hardcover
You know, before this book we were all sitting about in our drab marketing cubicles scampering to look EXACTLY like each other, with no glimmer of novelty in our existence. But then along came Mr. Godin with a sententious little epiphany -- Hey, why not be different, cuz people will notice, you know!
You bet. And if this primeval rainbow had to be squeeze-dried and smudged into a book, perhaps the least we could have been blessed with would be ONE piece of wisdom on HOW to be different.
That's missing. As is anything else of any meaning here, barring about a dozen not-so-amoosing cow puns on the carton, or perfectly predictable notions about "setting up a dialog with your customers".
"Ideavirus" was somewhat passable in its content but this monograph belongs snugly in the milk carton whence it emerged. Actually, come to think of it, the carton is the only thing I may want to keep.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most recent customer reviews



Feedback