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Q: The Winged Serpent [Blu-ray]


List Price: CDN$ 19.99
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Frequently Bought Together

Q: The Winged Serpent [Blu-ray] + Dark Angel [Blu-ray] + Swamp Thing [Blu-ray + DVD]
Price For All Three: CDN$ 55.96


Product Details

  • Actors: Michael Moriarty, David Carradine, Candy Clark, Richard Roundtree
  • Directors: Larry Cohen
  • Format: Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: R
  • Studio: Shout! Factory
  • Release Date: Aug. 27 2013
  • Run Time: 93 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00CPTUNWO
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #14,364 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Product Description

A winged aztec serpent (named quetzacoatl after an aztec god who was half reptile and half bird) escapes from its manhattan skyscraper lair and perpetrates a series of bizarre slayings. //

Amazon.ca

OK, who's Q, anyway? "Q" is short for Quetzacoatl, an enormous winged serpent and Aztec deity who's called back to life after a series of ritual human sacrifices in Manhattan. It takes a lot to keep a critter like Q satisfied, so he flies around and lops the heads off sunbathers, window washers and swimmers as handily as popping grapes off the vine. The police are confounded by the murders, decapitated bodies (blood rains from the skies on NYC denizens) and Q-sightings. The solution comes in the unlikely form of Jimmy (Michael Moriarty), a petty thief. After a heist goes bad, he hides from his cronies in the uppermost spires of the Chrysler Building and stumbles on the giant bird's nest and egg. He leads the NYPD up to the lair for a big showdown with Q, but it's not quite as easy as anybody thought, of course. Director/screenwriter Larry Cohen was one of the more inventive, original voices of Seventies B-movies, with credits that include God Told Me To, Black Caesar, It's Alive!, Hell Up in Harlem and The Stuff. With Q, Cohen put together an interesting, entertaining mix of Fifties sci-fi homage (complete with great stop-motion special effects for the terrifying beast), action movie, and crime drama. It also touches on the metaphysical question of how exactly one goes about killing off a god. It'd be difficult to think of a more compelling performance from Moriarty; as the piano-playing, scat-singing small-time crook Jimmy, he's repellent and sleazy. However, he's struck on something that will give him 15 minutes to bask in the spotlight ("I'm the most important man in New York!", he gloats) and give him a chance to redeem himself and save thousands of lives. Moriarty brings a depth to the character that makes him absorbing, if not quite sympathetic, and gets to come across with the choice line, "Stick it up your…brain! Your small little brain!". With plenty of humor, suspense, a gallon or two of gore, and great performances from Moriarty and David Carradine and Richard Roundtree as his cop nemeses, this is great, original, entertaining sci-fi fare. --Jerry Renshaw --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Yan Ong on Jan. 5 2004
Format: DVD
I remember seeing this film when I was 7 or 8 years old and it scared me senseless. Seeing people getting their heads chopped off and mutalated from who knows what that flies around a big city gave me an uneasy eerie feeling. I didn't know what the name of this movie was and I was looking for it in the video stores. I stumbled onto this accidentally and taking my chances of this being the dragon in the sky killing people movie that I saw 20 years ago, I bought it. After seeing it again, this is the movie that scared me to death so many years ago. Though, by today's standards, this movie is rather cheap and cheesy, it still gave me that uneasy eerie feeling. This movie is original, having a flying dragon that is summoned by ritual killings, that eats people like birds eat worms. This movie is a hybrid of Godzilla and slasher flicks. This is definately B-movie material, but it's fun to watch and brings back some childhood memories... and that is worth more than the price of admission.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Bindy Sue Frønkünschtein on Jan. 2 2004
Format: DVD
Q is for Quetzalcoatl, the flying, feathered serpent god of the ancient aztecs. It seems that some nut is loose in NYC, performing ancient sacrificial rites on willing participants, skinning them alive and taking out hearts and things. The police figure it's just another crazy serial killer. Only David Carradine's character believes there's more to it than that. Meanwhile, a small-time, ex-heroin addict, and street crook (played perfectly sleazily by Michael Moriarty) is being hunted by thugs who think he's ripped them off. These elements begin to merge when a gigantic flying monster starts biting people's heads off in broad daylight! Moriarty stumbles upon the creature's nest, complete with giant egg, while trying to hide in the top of the Chrysler building. He later leads his enemies back to the nest, telling them he's hidden their money there. They quickly become monster chow. Moriarty then decides to tell police where the beast lives, if they will drop all charges against him, and give him a million bucks. He considers himself to be prince of the city, and becomes extremely arrogant about it. The cops destroy the egg and it's mum, in a battle reminiscent of king kong. The "high priest" serial killer guy is enraged by this, and pays a visit on our slimey anti-hero. This is a movie only Larry Cohen (It's Alive!, God Told Me To) would / could make! Low-low budget, but excellent nonetheless. We don't see a lot of the monster, but when we do, it's pretty cool for 1982. Q for Quality...
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Format: DVD
Q is a fun, low budget thriller from B-movie auteur Larry Cohen. The premise is that an ancient Mexican God Quetzalcoatl has taken the form of a giant flying serpent and is living somewhere in New York, feasting on unsuspecting residents. Sunbathers, window washers, high-rise construction workers are all fair game for this gigantic beast.
Michael Moriarity stars as Jimmy Quinn, an out of work piano man/small time criminal. It's so weird seeing him in a role like this, as I am used to seeing him on the TV show Law & Order as an ADA. In this movie, his character stumbles on the secret location of the beast's nest, and he tries to use that information to get money and the respect he thinks he deserves. While a criminal, I did feel a certain amount of sympathy for this character in the beginning, which evaporated rather slowly as the intoxication of power sets in, along with its' illusions. In the beginning, he was just some poor schlub who couldn't catch a break, but later on his true nature appeared. I read a quote once, I am not sure by who, that said something like 'to really see what's in a man's heart, give him some power'.
David Carradine plays a detective who's trying to solve a series of gruesome murders, and his investigation leads him into uncharted territories of the unknown. The deeper he gets, the more he butts heads with his supervisors, who would rather see things cleared up neatly and without any superstitious mumbo jumbo. Also look for Richard Roundtree, as Sergeant Powell, a cop wound a little too tight whose beliefs are based on what he can see and touch.
The actual creature does not get much screen time, but its' presence is noticeable throughout the movie.
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By Joshua Koppel on July 15 2003
Format: DVD
One does not usually expect to find quality acting in a movie like this, but I was quite surprised.
David Carradine plays a policeman on the trail of two cases that seem linked. The first involves a window washer who suddenly loses his head. Later there are more rooftop disappearances, seemingly perpetrated by a giant bird. The second case involved a series of ritualistic murders. They seem to be the work of a fanatic following Aztec rituals to bring back the god Quetzalcoatl.
Carradine's portrayal is excellent but he cannot hold a candle to Michael Moriarty who plays a down-on-his-luck loser. He wants to be a jazz pianist but is still unemployed. He is also a timid small-time crook. He is a driver ("I don't go inside and I don't carry a piece!"). But a job goes wrong and he finds himself on the run.
Moriarty hides in the Chrysler building and discovers that the run-down art-deco spire is the home of the giant bird. There is even an egg in the nest. A body hidden there gets him thinking. The city is in fear of the bird and he knows where it is. He is convinced he is now the most important man in the city.
Now that he thinks he has power, he holds the safety of the city for ransom. He wants money and a "Nixon-like" pardon. But his arrogant cockiness loses him his girl (she had felt sorry for him but now could see how mean he really is).
The city acquiesces to Moriarty's demands and go after the monster. Because the bird is not in the nest when they arrive, the city is able to pull out of the deal.
In the end, Carradine manages to take care of the bird and track down the ritual killer. Moriarty is back where he started minus one girlfriend (although Carradine tries to convince him to go back to her).
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