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Queen Of The Damned [Paperback]

Anne Rice
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (211 customer reviews)

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School & Library Binding CDN $14.64  
Paperback CDN $13.72  
Paperback, Feb. 8 1990 --  
Mass Market Paperback CDN $9.49  
Audio, CD --  

Book Description

Feb. 8 1990 The Vampire Chronicles (Book 3)
After 6,000 years of horrifying stillness, Akash, mother of all vampires and Queen of the Damned, has risen from her sleep to let loose the powers of the night. But her monstrous plan for ruling the worlds of the living and the undead must be stopped before she destroys mankind, and it falls to the evil vampire Lestat to fight her all-encompassing evil - for it is he who challenged her power by waking her from sleep.

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From Amazon

Did you ever wonder where all those mischievous vampires roaming the globe in Anne Rice's Vampire Chronicles came from? In this, the third book in the series, we find out. That raucous rock-star vampire Lestat interrupts the 6,000-year slumber of the mama of all bloodsuckers, Akasha, Queen of the Damned.

Akasha was once the queen of the Nile (she has a bit in common with the Egyptian goddess Isis), and it's unwise to rile her now that she's had 60 centuries of practice being undead. She is so peeved about male violence that she might just have to kill most of them. And she has her eye on handsome Lestat with other ideas as well.

If you felt that the previous books in the series weren't gory and erotic enough, this one should quench your thirst (though it may cause you to omit organ meats from your diet). It also boasts God's plenty of absorbing lore that enriches the tale that went before, including the back-story of the boy in Interview with the Vampire and the ancient fellowship of the Talamasca, which snoops on paranormal phenomena. Mostly, the book spins the complex yarn of Akasha's eerie, brooding brood and her nemeses, the terrifying sisters Maharet and Mekare. In one sense, Queen of the Damned is the ultimate multigenerational saga. --Tim Appelo --This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.

From Publishers Weekly

The cult audience for Rice's two previous vampire novels, Interview with the Vampire and The Vampire Lestat , will undoubtedly broaden with this third book, which features the same characters and a more complex plot. As before, Rice tells her story in fine melodramatic style, overwriting with zest and exuberance: the text pulses with menace, mystery and violence, and with sensuality verging on erotica. Here Lestat and all other vampires pay the price for his obsessive need for fame, his reckless honesty in describing the "blood drinkers" among us, and his frenzied rock concert in San Francisco. Lestat's kiss has awakened Queen Akasha from her 6000 year sleep. She immediately begins a wholesale slaughter of most of the world's vampires, sparing only a small remnant (including Lestat) who she expects will join her in a crazed crusade against male mortals. Meanwhile, vampires and psychic humans around the globe are having the same terrifying dream in which twin red-haired women weep over the body of another woman, whose eyes and brains are on a plate nearby. As Rice gradually reveals the significance of the dream, she also focuses on Jesse, who works for the Telamasca, a secret society that collects data on those with paranormal powers. Though she ingeniously pulls together the various plot strands, Rice then almost loses the reader in philosophic overkill. She regains her verve in the final chapter, however, promising yet another mesmerizing installment of the Vampire Chronicles. 150,000 first printing: Literary Guild main selection.
Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars One of her very best Nov. 17 2003
By Brian
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I have read this book twice.
It vies with "Interview with the vampire" for the honour of being my favourite Rice novel. Though interview is likely better, it has the advantage of being the first, whereas this has the disadvantage of being a sequel.
The book's imagery is top quality as it explores the coming of an apocalypse for vampires all over the world. Akasha, the mother vampire, the source of vampirism, and the one who's death would bring about the deaths of all vampires, has awoken from her long sleep and is travelling the world, slaughtering her own kind, and creating visitations among third world communities, where she encourages them to slaughter their males to bring about a 'perfect' world, free of war, rape etc.
Step in all the vampires we know and love from the previous two books (Armand, Louis, Marius, Lestat, Gabrielle), and a few new (and in my opinion even more interesting) ones led by a vampire as old as Akasha, the fascinating and bizarre character of Maharet, an old foe of hers, who was indirectly responsible for making Akasha a vampire 6000 years ago. These survivors gather and await a final meeting with their queen who's awakening was caused by the irreverent rock music of the vampire Lestat. There is also a love interest between Lestat and Akasha, and the highlight of the book, a spellbinding recounting of the events of six thousand years ago the Legend of the Twins, which is so skillfully and subtly brought to life.
The book is packed so full of interesting new characters, that eventually even Marius begins to look unspectacular in comparison. There is the enigmatic Khayman who is as old as Akasha, and Mael, Eric and Azim, as well as Jesse and Daniel. I reallu enjoyed reading this book, and i would strongly recomend it to anyone who enjoys quality fiction.
I can only give it four stars because a book that gets five should be nothing short of outstanding. But for me, four stars = excellent.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Well, I'll be damned... Nov. 9 2003
By A. Nod
Format:Mass Market Paperback
The main message remains as clear and complicated as ever, the art of being human and what it is to be human.
Rice's books have always had an underlying tone of loneliness, that aching feeling that immortality would wrought. It is the obsessions of all humans as it continues but never ends and hopefully it never will. This story is tinged with a note of nostalgia, regret, longing, pain and suffering infused with wonder, beauty, love, questioning, pain and hope. It is philosophy eloquently captured in the words and phrases of a gifted, talented and insightful writer. What more could you ask for? I completely fell in love with Queen of the Damned.
Readers who want a straight forward translation or a simple expression of words will not only be somewhat dissatisfied but may not find the patience that it need and takes for this kind of book. She does doesn't just do 'recap' but goes more indepth with the mythology of Akasha. In the 2nd book, we only got one perspective and a limited one at that. Perosnally, I enjoyed the historical tale behind the main story.
Each chapter is its own, diverse in the beginning and all coming together quite beautifully. The stories that are within the story give you a broader perspective on many different characters. Many new characters are reintroduced, no new chracters actually come up, everyone in QotD have been mentioned before.
However, I definitely loved certain parts better than others. With the 2nd one, I loved the whole thing, end of story. QotD, while I absolutely love it, a few small parts, I felt, could have been left out, shortened or expanded on. These are parts where many people get bored or impatient...BUT...don't give up!!! Keep going and read, you won't regret it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Queen of the Damned Sept. 5 2003
By josiane
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This book is about A Vampire gone "rock-star" which i think is weird but anyway. It was ok. the book was wonderful.i had also seen the movie and I loved it. do also know that they're where supose ot be longer that it was but we all know it was because of the death of Aaliyah.:( it was really sad. But my favorite part of it all (in the movie),is when Lastat is with Jesse in his house,I think,and she wants him to "show her what it's like" and when he does, it's sch a beautiful seen because it shows that she'd so anything to be with him and he starts to notice that.But the thing I don't get is why would akasha wait 200 or 300 years to wake when she gave blood to Lastat..it's almost as if she was lazy to wake, and It had to be at that point when he was a "rock-star" and falling for Jesse.But afcourse the book wasnt the same as the movie..I be honest I've seen the movie about 50 times. and I'm not joking. Ihave the movie on a tape(copy) and the tape is wearing out.I'd have to copy it again. My sisters get annoyed by me watching it over and over again.. i even know the lines by heart.and i'm not joking for that eather.If some was to watch it with me. they's notice i'd be speaking they're words.Now just talking about it I feel like watching the movie again
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4.0 out of 5 stars Immensely important yet problematic Aug. 7 2003
By Daniel Jolley TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Mass Market Paperback
The Queen of the Damned is strikingly different in both form and substance from the first two books of The Vampire Chronicles. Several new characters are introduced, a number of truly old vampires we have only heard of up until now become part of the action, and the story is woven together into a mosaic much more wide in scope from what has come before. This is essentially Lestat's book, but he is not really the focus of the tale; while he narrates his own role in events, much of the book is written in the third person. This, plus the addition of so many new characters and the truly elaborate scope that is covered, makes this novel much less cohesive than the first-person narratives of the first two books. The action is spread out over six thousand years from one end of the world to the other, with a lot of mythology and pondering taking the place of the thrilling, energetic action of the earlier novels.
The book begins a week or two before Lestat's legendary rock concert and the ensuing mayhem that erupted outside the auditorium on that night. We follow the paths of other vampires in the days prior to this, including Armand and Daniel, the young man from Interview With the Vampire. We also learn that the immolation of vampires that Lestat, Louis, and Gabrielle saw that night had actually begun several days earlier, as a number of covens were destroyed by Akasha, the newly awakened Queen of the Damned. After the story of her awakening is told, the book takes on a somewhat mystical air. Almost all vampires are dreaming of two red-headed young women preparing to feast upon their dead mother, only to be taken prisoner by soldiers while their village is destroyed around them.
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Most recent customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars The queen returns
Anne Rice revamped vampire fiction in "Interview with the Vampire," the first volume of her bestselling Vampire Chronicles. Read more
Published on Feb. 23 2007 by E. A Solinas
5.0 out of 5 stars The best of Anne Rice
I am a big fan of Mrs. Rice's Books. I fell in love with her characters from Interview with a vampire and have followed ever since. This is definitely her best. Read more
Published on Oct. 16 2006 by Yazmeen
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing follow up
Compared to 'The Vampire Lestat,' this story is not nearly as good. There are tons of random characters in this story that eventually come together and effect the story as a... Read more
Published on June 10 2004 by Amazon Customer
3.0 out of 5 stars Hmmmm
I cannot deny that Anne Rice is an incredibly gifted writer. Yet for some reason it takes me forever to get through her books. They are just not page turners for me. Read more
Published on June 3 2004 by Michael Grotchen
5.0 out of 5 stars A masterful book of fantastic storytelling!
This is just amazing. It's one of the best books I've ever read. Anne Rice weaves a masterful tale that sucks you in and never lets go. Read more
Published on May 14 2004 by A. Sybo
5.0 out of 5 stars A pinnacle in the series!
This and "Memnoch" are the best of the 5 Vampire Chronicles - after Memnoch, they start going downhill...
Published on April 24 2004 by Deygan Brendan
5.0 out of 5 stars If you have already seen the movie...
As a long time reader of Anne Rices' work I was very pleased with her efforts in "Queen of the Damned". Read more
Published on April 22 2004 by "mcdoan"
5.0 out of 5 stars Good.
This is my favorite novel by Anne Rice, probably because my favorite character, Khayman is in it, and no other book has him that I know of. Read more
Published on March 18 2004 by "thecrowchicky69"
4.0 out of 5 stars The Queen of the Damned
Anne Rice excels in her writing ability in this book which includes references to all of her main and secondary characters from the Vampire Chronicles. Read more
Published on March 15 2004 by Julie A. Goddard
2.0 out of 5 stars Over written, over wrought
A great example of an author not knowing when to quit.
Interview and Lestat were both great fun, but in trying to give her story a universal theme [ie: the end of the whole... Read more
Published on March 13 2004 by Sam D. Maloney
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