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Quicksilver Meat Dream


Price: CDN$ 13.31 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
19 new from CDN$ 7.39 9 used from CDN$ 3.95

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Frequently Bought Together

Quicksilver Meat Dream + Scenery And Fish + Dig
Price For All Three: CDN$ 38.18


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Product Details

  • Audio CD (April 8 2003)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Universal Music Group
  • ASIN: B00008VA1F
  • Other Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #22,771 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

Universal. 2004.

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Oct. 13 2003
Format: Audio CD
I'm not a reviewer as such, so I'll just give you my story. I was a long-time IME fan, and stuck to my guns that they were as good as ever with Blue Green Orange. After waiting so long for a new album, I wasted no time buying the Quicksilver Meat Dream, just out of loyalty. I was immediately taken aback by how much heavier the sound was, how the Tannas and Bruce Gordon could still combine catchy and challenging, and how great Brian Byrne was vocally. Still, when I put the CD back in its case, my first words were, "I think I wasted my money on this". Maybe I was put off by the relative darkness of the album, especially compared to the feel-good vibe of Scenery And Fish. Maybe the increased progressiveness of a few of the songs was too much to handle. Maybe they were trying to be something they weren't.
Still, something compelled me to listen to it again. When I did, I noticed that IME really IS somewhere inside those tunes (maybe even all over them), and that, just as in albums past, repeated listenings made the songs catch on with me. The instrumentation and song craft blew my mind, and the vocals were always phenomenal, maybe the best on ANY IME record. This record is amazing! These songs are now firmly planted in my brain, and I wonder how I could've dismissed them in the first place. They have depth and feeling. They make a cohesive collection in which skipping tracks is not only unnecessary, but is cheating you as a listener. Maybe best of all, they rock in a way that should silence everyone who said IME "wussed out" with their last album. In short, these songs could make this the most underrated major-label album of the year. Buy it and see why.
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Format: Audio CD
As many fans were, I was a little disappointed with IME's last studio effort, "Blue Green Orange"... not that it was a bad album by any means, but it didn't seem to have the same fire of "Dig" or "Scenery And Fish". That is now the past! "The Quicksilver Meat Dream" excels far beyond my expectations, from the haunting first tracks of "0157:H7" and "I Is Us", to the incredible "Soft Bomb Salad", "Hell And Malfunction", "Meat Dreams", and my favorite right now "God Rocket". Utilizing electronic rhythms as a forefront on many of these songs, it gives an added atmosphere of stability even as the musicians go somewhat "chaotic but still controlled". You still hear the original IME riffs and feel here, but they are expanded with many new moods. Brian's vocals are exceptionally strong on this effort, and in my opinion surpass original vocalist Edwin. Christian's drumming is fired up as well, and Jagori and Bruce are filling in with the right runs at the right time. If this is a preview of the years to come, I think IME will finally get the international recognition they should have gotten many years ago.
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By B. Fields on June 23 2003
Format: Audio CD
This is one of those rare albums that you can listen to from beginning to end and fully enjoy. In fact, if you skip a track, you're really missing out. The music itself forms a lose concept album, with similar riffs, sounds and structures throughout.
Having said that, each song has its own nuances that keep the album moving.
The problem with many cohesive, conept-type albums out there is that none of the songs can stand on their own. Such is not the case with QMD.
This is indeed a darker, heavier I Mother Earth album than previous efforts, but the clever melodies and instrumentation that separate the band from others of the same genre are still prevelant. The driving, almost optimistic riffs are there, especially in the climax of Meat Dreams, an eight-minute track.
For me, this album is not quite as enjoyable as Blue Green Orange, but is easily as atmospheric, if not more so.
Whirring, electronic percussion and sequencer blips fill the space between the music, which itself ranges from the most fierce the band has ever composed to soft, floating melodies.
Christian Tanna is a driving presence on the album. His drumming on QMD is arguably the best on any of the band's four albums. Jag Tanna's unique style of guitar work also comes to the forefront on this album, going well past the banging, dissonant power chords utilized by other bands.
In essence, this is I Mother Earth's spin on contemporary metal, and they put it into orbit.
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By B. Fields on June 23 2003
Format: Audio CD
This is one of those rare albums that you can listen to from beginning to end and fully enjoy. In fact, if you skip a track, you're really missing out. The music itself forms a lose concept album, with similar riffs, sounds and structures throughout.
Having said that, each song has its own nuances that keep the album moving.
The problem with many cohesive, conept-type albums out there is that none of the songs can stand on their own. Such is not the case with QMD.
This is indeed a darker, heavier I Mother Earth album than previous efforts, but the clever melodies and instrumentation that separate the band from others of the same genre are still prevelant. The driving, almost optimistic riffs are there, especially in the climax of Meat Dreams, an eight-minute track.
For me, this album is not quite as enjoyable as Blue Green Orange, but is easily as atmospheric, if not more so.
Whirring, electronic percussion and sequencer blips fill the space between the music, which itself ranges from the most fierce the band has ever composed to soft, floating melodies.
Christian Tanna is a driving presence on the album. His drumming on QMD is arguably the best on any of the band's four albums. Jag Tanna's unique style of guitar work also comes to the forefront on this album, going well past the banging, dissonant power chords utilized by other bands.
In essence, this is I Mother Earth's spin on contemporary metal, and they put it into orbit.
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