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Quiz Show (Bilingual)


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Product Details

  • Actors: Ralph Fiennes, John Turturro, Hank Azaria, Rob Morrow, David Paymer
  • Directors: Robert Redford
  • Writers: Paul Attanasio
  • Format: Closed-captioned, Color, DVD-Video, Letterboxed, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English, French
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: PG-13
  • Studio: Touchstone Home Entertainment
  • Release Date: Jan. 13 2004
  • Run Time: 133 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6305428522
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #25,463 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Product Description

Academy Award(R)-winner Robert Redford (1980, Best Director, ORIDINARY PEOPLE) directs the critically acclaimed triumph, QUIZ SHOW, cheered as "One Of The Year's 10 Best" by over 80 critics nationwide. It's an exciting look behind the scenes at the thrills and high-stakes competition of TV's hottest big-money game show! But fame and fortune become a hotbed of scandal when a Washington investigator (Rob Morrow -- NORTHERN EXPOSURE) uncovers corruption beneath the quiz show's glittering facade. The scandal implicates both the wildly popular champion (Ralph Fiennes -- 1996 Academy Award(R) Best Actor nominee, THE ENGLISH PATIENT) and the disgruntled ex-champ (John Turturro, ROUNDERS). A powerful story with unforgettable performances -- don't miss this suspense-filled hit!

Amazon.ca

This vigorously entertaining film, sharply directed by Robert Redford from Paul Attanasio's brilliant screenplay, is based on the game-show scandals of the 1950s, when TV quiz shows were rigged to attract higher ratings and lucrative sponsorships. The fact-based story focuses on the quiz show Twenty-One and popular contestant Charles Van Doren (Ralph Fiennes), a charming, well-bred intellectual who agreed to win the game by using answers supplied by the show's producers. This unfair advantage turned Van Doren into a prototypical media darling at the expense of reigning Twenty-One champion Herbie Stempel (John Turturro, in a bravura performance), a working-class Jewish contestant who, according to the show's sponsors, had worn out his welcome in the public eye. When a congressional investigator (Rob Morrow) catches on to the scam and Stempel blows the whistle on this backstage manipulation, Quiz Show becomes a smart, political exposé about the first generation of television, the corrupting effect of celebrity and success, and the ongoing loss of innocence in American society. Bristling with superior dialogue and energized by an excellent cast including Paul Scofield as Van Doren's morally upstanding father, Quiz Show succeeds as history lesson, intelligent thriller, and morality tale, setting the stage for the countless scandals that would follow in a nation addicted to television. --Jeff Shannon --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Themis-Athena on May 14 2004
Format: DVD
Ah, the good ol' Fifties. The time when, after decades of depression and war, people finally wanted to get on with their lives, rebuild the economy and sweep everything dark and dirty under a big rug (including the escalating arms race with the Soviet Union). When television was everybody's new best friend, and ruled by the likes of Ed Sullivan, Lassie, Bozo the Clown and Lucy ... and by quiz shows.
Well aware of the contests' new, uniquely thrilling live entertainment, studio executives and sponsors quickly capitalized on their appeal, eager to maximize the resulting profits. To that end, however, the shows' outcome couldn't be left to chance: Then as now, viewers were looking for the "right" kind of hero to identify with; so ultimately it was unthinkable to let someone like Herbert Stempel (John Turturro) - not only an annoying nerd with thick glasses and bad teeth but worse, an annoying *Jewish* nerd with thick glasses and bad teeth - win the famous "Twenty-One" for more than a couple of weeks. A more suitable replacement was found in Columbia University lecturer Charles Van Doren (Ralph Fiennes), descendant of one of New England's foremost intellectual families and, in the words of the show's co-producer Albert Freedman (Hank Azaria), soon the TV nation's new "great white hope." A brilliant intellectual who nevertheless felt eternally inferior to his Pulitzer Prize-winning father, poet Mark Van Doren (Paul Scofield), his mother (Elizabeth Wilson), likewise a distinguished author, and his uncle, Pulitzer Prize winner Carl Van Doren, Charles ultimately agreed to sell his integrity for a high flight to fame and fortune on borrowed wings, and thus succumbed to the one force driving a quiz show's appeal more than anything else: money, and astronomically large sums thereof.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By KyleJones on Nov. 1 2006
Format: DVD
I only saw this film recently, twelve years after it was released. I was expecting a good film, but what I got was a great one. The story sounded like it would be interesting, but watching this movie is no dry intellectual journey. You find yourself totally absorbed as with a well-crafted thriller. No character is black and white, and people make decisions for complex reasons in a very complex situation. There are no clear-cut heroes and villains, and you will find yourself wondering what you would have done in the same situation, whether you might have been willing to tell a few white lies to make people happy, and ultimately realise you'd made a deal with the devil which you couldn't step away from at any point without huge embarrassment and serious consequences, to others as well as to yourself.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kona TOP 500 REVIEWER on Nov. 1 2010
Format: DVD
The year is 1957, and everyone in America is watching the popular TV game show, "Twenty-One." Contestants can stay on the show for weeks, earning then-astronomical sums of money and becoming household names. Such was the case for Herbert Stemple (John Turturro), a buck-toothed, blue-collar guy who raked in the money. Little did the public know that the show was entirely scripted and that Herb was told the answers in advance. When Charles Van Doren (Ralph Fiennes) a bright, attractive college instructor came on the show, the producers decided it was time for Herb to lose; he did and Van Doren became the biggest thing on television, even making the cover of Time Magazine. But he and the show were no match for Congressional watchdog Dick Goodwin (Rob Morrow) who exposed the show for the fraud that it was.

I was really surprised at how exciting this movie was. It's got humor and drama and is filled with tension. Fiennes portrays Van Doren as a witty, charming Connecticut Yankee from an influential family. We care about him and suffer with him as he prepares to confess his part in the fraud not only to Congress, but to his trusting father. Turturro's Herbie is a fascinating, naive, greedy man whose life was ruined by the show. Morrow is excellent as the whistle-blower.

The movie is a wonderful look back at a time when we as a people were so much more trusting and innocent. This scandal rocked the nation and changed us forever. This is a great movie.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on April 17 2004
Format: DVD
The first era of prime-time television programming was the Vaudeo Era, which was defined by shows like "The Texaco Star Theater" with Milton Berle, "Your Show of Shows" with Sid Caesar, and "I Love Lucy." However, during the Fifties television underwent monumental changes in terms of how shows were produced. There are two specific programs that represent the major changes. One is "Dragnet," which was the first successful series that was filmed in Hollywood and represented the shift away from live television broadcast from New York. The other is the CBS game show "Dotto," which was the first such show to be exposed as being rigged in 1958. It was not as successful as "The $64,000 Question," which was apparently run cleanly, or as infamous as "Twenty-One," which is the basis for the 1994 film "Quiz Show," but it was first. Because the quiz show scandal was driven by the greed of corporate sponsors, networks then began the practice of selling advertising time. No longer would a sponsor, such as Geritol, be able to decide what programs would go on the air.
However, Robert Redford's film is not really about the massive changes in the business of television that resulted from the quiz show scandals. The final word in this film is given to Dan Enright (David Paymer), the producer of "Twenty-One," who insists that because the show was entertainment and everybody made money, there was nothing wrong with giving contestants the answers and rigging the game. The point of this film is the human wreckage left behind by the scandal in terms of the two "Twenty-One" contestants at the center of the storm.
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