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Quo Vadis (Two-Disc Special Edition)


Price: CDN$ 35.69 & FREE Shipping. Details
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Frequently Bought Together

Quo Vadis (Two-Disc Special Edition) + The Robe (Bilingual) + Cleopatra: 50th Anniversary Edition (Bilingual)
Price For All Three: CDN$ 53.85


Product Details

  • Actors: Robert Taylor, Deborah Kerr, Peter Ustinov, Leo Genn, Patricia Laffan
  • Directors: Anthony Mann
  • Format: NTSC, Color, Dolby
  • Language: English, French
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish, Japanese
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • MPAA Rating: NR
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • Run Time: 171 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005JN8Z
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #36,903 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Restored 2-DVD epic tale of Rome, starring Robert Taylor, Deborah Kerr, and Peter Ustinov. Nominated for 8 Academy Awards, including Best Picture. Includes new featurettes and film historian commentary.

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Simon Davis on April 4 2004
Format: VHS Tape
"Quo Vadis", based on the novel by Henryk Sienkiewicz would have to be near the top of my list of favourite 1950's religious epic productions. Indeed "Epic" is the word to fittingly describe this mammoth MGM production that cost an amazing 7 million dollars to make in 1950 and was the studio's biggest money maker since "Gone With The Wind". It has everything an epic movie lover could desire, the already stated fine literary source, breathtaking sets (no computer generated effects here!), meticulously researched historical costumes, enormous crowds scenes and a stunning recreation of Pagan Rome at it's height. The film boasts an extraordinary cast but towering over all of them is the late Peter Ustinov in his unforgettable performance as the deranged Nero. His interpretation of this infamous Emperor who began the first concentrated persecution of the early Christians is still the visual image for a lot of people, myself included,that first comes to mind when Nero's name is mentioned. Already having been filmed a number of times in the silent era and once again since this 1951 film, this is still the definitive version of the story of the early Christian Church struggling to survive in Nero's Rome after the great fire.
With the advent of television in the early 1950's Hollywood fought back with splashy, lavish productions that could not be matched by the flickering black and white image of television in it's infancy. "Quo Vadis", lent itself perfectly for this purpose and an already shaky MGM put all of it's resources into the filming of this elaborate production. The story centres around cocky Roman soldier Marcus Vinicius (Robert Taylor) who after three years of successful campaigning returns to savour the delights of Nero's Rome.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By J. Botha on April 1 2004
Format: VHS Tape
One of the greatest epic movies ever made, Quo Vardis? tells the thrilling story of the formative years of christianity in ancient Rome. Quo Vardis? is an excellent and down right entertaining film.
The now late Peter Ustinov put's in a superb performance as a manic emperor Nero that has to be seen to be believed! Robert Taylor makes a dashing, if thuggish, Roman who falls under the charms of virtuous Deborah Kerr, (who wouldn't!!).
A beautifully told tale based on fact. This is a film that deserves to be on dvd.
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Format: VHS Tape
Picking up not long after I, CLAUDIUS leaves off, this film puts us in the latter epoch of the rule of Nero. Peter Ustinov's memorable portrayal of the eccentric (and probably downright mad) emperor is how most of us picture him these days. In fact, Ustinov might be the #1 reason people should buy this epic.
The story depicts the plight of the early Christians. It is true that they were persecuted and tormented after Nero blamed them for the great fire of Rome. The film tends to be pro-Christian and anti-Roman, but it does do a good job of presenting a few notable Romans as just and virtuous.
Of course, in this day & age non-Christians are not so prone to feel sympathetic with these early practitioners of the religion. After all, by far & away more Pagans and Muslims were killed by Christians during the Crusades than Christians killed by Pagans / Romans (not to mention all of the Protestants burnt @ the stake by the Catholics). That is even including the genocide under the reign of Diocletion.
That said, there is a broader message that lies in this movie, and that is the tendency towards cruelty and violence that has haunted man since the beginning, religion & politics or not. The film does an agreeable job of detailing this facet of human existence, and it's something that even the greatest cynics can't help but appreciate.
The single best aspect of QUO VADIS? is that it takes us back to ancient Rome. The sets are lavish & spectacular. The representations of the Roman bathing rituals and victorious TRIUMPHS are exceptionally accurate. We also get to observe the likes of the orator Seneca, the apostle Paul, the Praetorian guard leader Tigellinus and the future emperors Nerva and Galba. Wonderfull stuff!
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Format: VHS Tape
Quo Vadis is a movie Ive seen many times and never tire watching. It has beautiful and panoramic scenes making it worthy of an epic. I loved Ustinov playing the evil demonic Nero and Laffan playing Nero's Empress wife. Truely I rarely see such great acting in our films of today.
The greatest attributes of the film are the colliseum scenes in which the Christians are slaughtered for falsley being blamed for the burning of Rome. Nero was fully responsible for this horrid act. The scenes of Nero's court are entertaining and funny to see. Watching all of Nero's men cowtowing to their emperor and at the same time showing contempt for Nero's actions.
The sets are great for 1951 standards and even by todays standards. The Roman Legion formations and custumes were excellent. Taylor's acting is medicore but sufficient and Debra Kerr is a beautiful woman who portrays the poor Christian slave convincingly. It is so so convincing, you would think she was a devout Christian in her private life to her credit as an actress. Also the costumes deserve a five star rating!
The only negative thoughts to the film are the historial accuracies which reveal how short of time the Christian persecution lasted. It didn't end with the end of Nero. Don't let this keep you from buying a great film which does show some Roman and early Christian history and how Roman society existed during Nero's rule. I can't wait for the DVD production of this film. I only wish Hollywood would show films of this quality.
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