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RCA ANT800 Flat Digital Outdoor Antenna (Black)

by RCA
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 115.57
Price: CDN$ 103.97
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Only 6 left in stock.
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Technical Details

  • No special oreintation or adjustments required due to patented 360 degree reception pattern
  • Supports all digital and analog TV frequencies including VHF and UHF and 1080 signals
  • Extended range signal reception quality and needs no adjustment
  • Paintable ultra compact design disappears into surroundings
  • For outdoor use and comes with mounting hardware and power adapter

Frequently Bought Together

Customers buy this item with RCA TVPRAMP1R Outdoor Antenna Preamplifier CDN$ 36.83

RCA ANT800 Flat Digital Outdoor Antenna (Black) + RCA TVPRAMP1R Outdoor Antenna Preamplifier
Price For Both: CDN$ 140.80

These items are shipped from and sold by different sellers. Show details



System Requirements

  • Media: Electronics
  • Item Quantity: 1

Product Details


Product Description

Amazon.ca Product Description

RCA flat digital outdoor antenna is designed for the most challenging reception environments. Innovative patented 360 degree reception pattern eliminates adjustments and simplifies installation as no special orientation is required. Superior construction and tough materials withstand outdoor conditions. Paintable ultra compact design disappears into surroundings and adapts for attic use. Designed for DTV and receives local HD and all digital TV broadcasts. Supports all digital and analog frequencies (VHF and UHF) and broadcast 1080 HDTV. Enhances reception by amplifying weak signals and high gain picks up further stations. Preserves signal purity with Extremely Low Noise (ELN) circuitry. Mounting hardware and power adapter included. One year limited warranty.

Product Description

RCA flat digital outdoor antenna is designed for the most challenging reception environments. Innovative patented 360 degree reception pattern eliminates adjustments and simplifies installation as no special orientation is required. Superior construction and tough materials withstand outdoor conditions. Paintable ultra compact design disappears into surroundings and adapts for attic use. Designed for DTV and receives local HD and all digital TV broadcasts. Supports all digital and analog frequencies (VHF and UHF) and broadcast 1080 HDTV. Enhances reception by amplifying weak signals and high gain picks up further stations. Preserves signal purity with Extremely Low Noise (ELN) circuitry. Mounting hardware and power adapter included. One year limited warranty.


Customer Reviews

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4.7 out of 5 stars
4.7 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic antenna Nov. 25 2013
Verified Purchase
Purchased this to try instead of satellite...excellent choice so far. Picks up 15 channels, SD & HD, and most of these channels are coming from 80 to 100km away (50 - 65 miles). We'll never need to pay for satellite!! Easy installation as well, and currently getting all these channels indoor pointing through a window. Perhaps we'll even get more channels once we mount it up high!
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4.0 out of 5 stars It seems to work in a big city Nov. 17 2013
Verified Purchase
I can get 12 stations in Vancouver from the Oakridge area, when oriented vertically against the North.
The only thing I did not like is that you cannot turn the antenna 180 degrees without dismantling the attachment to the base holder. It is only one bolt and nut, but it can be tricky, if the base has been previously attached at the highest point of the roof I could reach from my ladder. By trying to turn the antenna 180 degrees, I accidently unscrewed the two holding bolts too much and their nuts inside the antenna felt out of the plastic groove & started to rotate. To tighten the bolts back again, I had to take apart o the whole antenna (about 20 little screws).
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5.0 out of 5 stars works great Aug. 29 2013
By Tallguy
Verified Purchase
I live in Mississauga, Ontario and the ANT800 easily receives all of the Metro Toronto stations and Hamilton. Some of the US stations from the Buffalo area, which are about 90KM (60 miles) away, usually have a good signal but they do go black from time to time, even in clear weather. The instal was very easy as I mounted the antenna on the old Bell satellite post. I'm very happy with the picture quality that I'm getting.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  77 reviews
26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars less effective than a passive antenna Nov. 19 2010
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
I replaced my RCA ANT1050 passive antenna with this model and got worse OTA television reception. I am 40 miles north of the TV broadcast cluster in Dallas, and the result was one extra channel from Forth Worth and the garbling of most strong channels.

It seems that a passive antenna is almost always better choice for digital TV, especially if most of the channels that you care about are already coming in strong. The best way to improve reception is to put a passive antenna higher up, like in an attic or on a chimney, not by adding an amplifier.

Pros:

* The RCA ANT800 looks discrete and is unlikely to annoy your neighbors or HOA agent.

* Can be mounted on a flat surface or on a pole, either horizontally or vertically.

* Includes mounting hardware.

Cons:

* Requires external power. My Kill-A-Watt says that it draws 10 watts continuously.

* Doesn't work passively.

* The installation instructions are ambiguous about how to orient the antenna. Parallel to the ground seems to be the best way.

While trying to troubleshoot my installation, I noticed that performance degrades if the power supply is too far away from the ANT800, like beside the TV receiver. The drop over a 40ft RG6 cable was noticeable, which is what you would need to put the antenna on a second story roof. My passive antenna works perfectly over the same cable.
25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It works, but don't expect miracles May 20 2010
By Jim K - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
First, let me describe my TV reception problem. I live in the urban core of a medium-size metropolitan area, so getting good TV reception shouldn't be too challenging. Unfortunately, I live in a condominium in a low spot (there's a rock wall behind my building that extends above my roof line).

I thought RCA ANT800 would be a good choice for me because it appeared that it would be versatile (indoor or outdoor), easy to install (not too big and comes with a mounting bracket) and it's omnidirectional. As I said, I live in the middle of the city, but all the broadcast towers are about 10-12 miles away, some north, some south and some west of me. So I needed either an omnidirectional antenna or a directional antenna with a rotor. Also, the local stations transmit on a mix of VHF low, VHF high and UHF, and the ANT800 is supposed to work with all broadcast frequencies. I've noticed that a lot of TV antennas only work with UHF or with VHF high and UHF, so be sure to check that before you buy any antenna.

At first I tried the ANT800 as an indoor antenna behind the TV. It picked up several channels, but I wanted all the local channels. Then I tried it in the attic. That worked better, but I still couldn't get the PBS channel, and that's the most important channel for me. My last option was to mount it outside, which is more difficult.

I opted to mount it upside-down from the eave overhang outside the back door. The main difficulty to that was with the mounting bracket. It has four screw holes in it, but they're too far apart to use on a single 2-by-4, so I had to screw it to another board then attach that to two 2-by-4s in the overhang.

Another problem is that the antenna is supposed to be an outdoor antenna, but it doesn't come with a grounding block, and the instructions don't mention anything about grounding it. So I bought a grounding block and wire and a signal splitter for three TV sets and got it all hooked up.

I'm happy to report that I can now pick up all the local TV channels, even PBS. I can't pick up any out-of-town stations, but I really wasn't expecting to. And reception isn't perfect. There are still periodic signal losses, where the picture will freeze or blot out and the audio will go out for a couple of seconds. It doesn't happen often enough to be really annoying, and I imagine if I wasn't splitting the signal it would come in strong enough not to drop out like that.

So the bottom line is it works fairly well for me. Since I live in the middle of the city I was hoping it would work in the attic and give me perfect reception. Well, I had to put it up outside and the reception isn't perfect but it's close.
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great antenna for the Dallas metroplex! Aug. 26 2013
By John C - Published on Amazon.com
If you're thinking about pulling the plug on cable, the RCA ANT-800F is a great HD antenna for the Dallas metroplex. I live in west Plano about 32 miles away from the nearest broadcast towers. This antenna brings in 47 channels with rock-solid clarity. In fact, the picture quality is better than that I was getting through Time Warner cable!

I did a LOT of research before deciding on this antenna, but once I installed it, I found out how great it really is! Thanks to its compact design, it can be used in any neighborhood without concern over homeowners covenants. And it's easy to install.

The only negative I found is that the installation manual could be MUCH better. Several things are implied, but not made explicit. These include:

* It is best to mount the antenna outdoors as high as possible, preferably below the eaves.

* If it is mounted in an attic, you'll cut your signal strength in half just getting through asphalt singles. And if you have a radiant barrier in your attic, you'll likely get NO signal at all.

* If mounting outdoors, the mounting bracket is designed to be mounted on a vertical wall. Also, the back side of the antenna (where the coax connector and assembly screws are located) should not be pointed upward in that it the recesses for the assembly screws would collect water which could seep into the antenna module.

* The antenna MUST be mounted a sufficient distance from other metal objects such as rain gutters and attic vents so that these object do not attenuate the incoming signal. Experimentation showed that locating the antenna 2 feet away from the nearest gutter or vent is sufficient.

* The antenna should be located on the side of your house that faces the broadcast towers. You can determine the broadcast tower locations and distance by using a site such as tvfool.com and entering your zip code.

* The antenna may be oriented horizontal, diagonally, or vertically. Horizontal will provide you with the best picture quality. In this position, I received 47 channels. However, I could not receive stations above channel 60. In the vertical orientation, I received 67 channels, but the picture quality, while still good, was not as sharp. All the channels I cared about are in the 2 - 60 range, so I went with the horizontal orientation. As I mentioned before, the picture quality is this orientation is better than the typical channel quality through Time Warner.

The antenna comes with an amplifier to boost signal strength and allow you to distribute the signal to multiple TVs. I didn't use that amplifier in that I already had an amp in my cable distribution center in my attic. So I simply disconnected the Time Warner cable from the input to my amp and connected the coax from the antenna to that input. If your house is wired for cable, you can do the same and simply connect your HDTV's to the coax connections in the walls.

If you have a SDTV (standard definition TV), you'll need a converter box to convert the digital signal from the antenna to the analog composite signals that can be used by your SDTV. HomeWorx offers a great converter box (model HW-150PVR) for around $46.00 through Amazon. Not only does the HomeWorx box do a great of converting the incoming digital signal to analog, but it also functions as a video recorder and will record any show to a flash drive or hard disk drive plugged into its USB port. Once recorded, you can play it back again whenever you desire.
17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fabulous option for the monetarily challenged Dec 2 2009
By Suzanne Patricia Doell - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This is the best purchase I have made in a long time. It is easy to install and picks up more channels than I expected. All the channels are crystal clear and the antena is not an eye sore. It actually looks pretty slick on the roof and everyone thinks it is some fancy satelite disc.
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Solid Antenna Nov. 18 2010
By hans - Published on Amazon.com
After cancelling Cable I scoped out an antenna to use in my Suburban location. I did some research and found the RCA ANT800 to be a modestly priced device that is not overbearing in it's looks. I live in a subdivision, so mounting a huge antenna on my house would be gaudy (and probably provoke the HOA to ask me about it, which, btw can not be banned, see [...])

Anyway, I went to antennaweb.org and got the following listing of possible channels:
vhf WOOD-DT 8.1 NBC GRAND RAPIDS, MI 192° 17.8 7
uhf WOLP-CA 27 MNT GRAND RAPIDS, MI 283° 9.5 27
uhf WXSP-CD 15.1 MNT GRAND RAPIDS, MI 296° 14.6 15
vhf WGVU-DT 35.1 PBS GRAND RAPIDS, MI 279° 21.6 11
uhf WTLJ-DT 54.1 TCT MUSKEGON, MI 278° 21.9 24
uhf WXMI-DT 17.1 FOX GRAND RAPIDS, MI 196° 17.9 19
vhf WWMT-DT 3.1 CBS KALAMAZOO, MI 195° 21.7 8
uhf WZPX-DT 43.1 ION BATTLE CREEK, MI 137° 27.3 44
vhf WZZM-DT 13.1 ABC GRAND RAPIDS, MI 324° 33.8 13

Ecouraged, I bought the RCA ANT800 due to it's alleged multi-directional capability (which I needed based on the above listing that shows the stations are basically in a 180 degree span behind my house) and the antenna's reported range of about 30 miles.

First, let me say going to over-the-air TV is not a plug-and-play situation. If you think you are going to just plug the thing in and be watching TV, you are wrong. You will need to spend time playing around with the antenna to get it working.

I was able to plug the antenna into my cable jack (and then re-route that jack into 'feed' part of my whole house splitter) in the highest point inside my home and get 2-3 channels ( 3.1 and 8.1 and 54.1 ). I wanted more channels so I spent some quality time on my roof... This is a 2 person without a doubt, preferably with a 2-way radio (cell phone created interference). I learned the hard way that A.) You can not be near the antenna because the human body actually will increase performance of the antenna. B.) You must have your TV set to "Antenna", not "Cable". C.) Always set your TV to re-scan after you futz around with antenna.

The multi-directional aspect of the antenna is OK, but slight changes to the orientation/position of the antenna does make a difference, a big difference in fact. Subtle changes matter... literally inches. If I had the antenna too low on the roof it would not pick up 1 or 2 channels, a couple of inches another way (higher) and eureka! In the end I found a sweet spot on my roof that allows me to pick up the major channels (CBS, NBC, FOX, ABC, and PBS). I get some other channels mixed in (i.e. 3.1, 3.2, 3.3) plus some other weird channels that I don't plan on watching. The best bet will be to put the antenna on the roof that has no other roof sections coming near it and well away from ANY sort of metal (like the flashing beneath shingles were valleys form, or metal siding pieces). Metal is bad for antenna's, find a clear spot.

The instructions do not give solid information on mounting to a roof, specifically, what (if anything) do I need to do to make sure I don't get a roof leak after I screw this thing into my roof? I also am wondering how snow/rain will effect the performance. I have not permanently mounted the antenna yet, I want to consult some more "experts" on how to make sure I don't get water leaking into my house after I screw this thing in, as the instructions say absolutely nothing on this subject, unless of course that is only covered in the Spanish or French section :)

For the size, looks and the price, it is a good deal. It will require a little investment in time, and will need to go on the highest part of your house that you can safely get to in order to get the most/best reception.
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