CDN$ 136.05
  • List Price: CDN$ 187.99
  • You Save: CDN$ 51.94 (28%)
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Random Graphs Hardcover – Mar 13 2000


Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 136.05
CDN$ 136.05 CDN$ 182.93

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details



Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
The notion of a random graph originated in a paper of Erdos (1947), which is considered by some as the first conscious application of the probabilistic method. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.ca
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
No Match for Bollobas' Book on the same Subject Dec 30 2007
By PST - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The book claims to be a successor of Prof. Bollobas' book of the same title. Unlike Prof. Bollobas' book, I do not think this one is a very good textbook: The proofs of many theorems are not given, but the reader is directed to some source; these theorems are not of some unrelated subject, but their topic is random graphs. These unproven theorems are then used in the sequel to prove other theorems.
Furthermore, many proofs are delegated to "Excercises!", but no solutions are given.
Thirdly (at least for me, I am not a professional mathematician), the presentation is at very uneven levels: Very easy derivations and extremely hard derivations are mixed together, it seems the authors have little feel for the difficulty of their exposition.

On the positive side: The book is vitually typo-free, and the section on inequalities is much clearer -actually very good!- than the one in Prof. Bollobas's book.

A curious aside: two pages (pages 180, 181) were simply missing, and they were also missing in a second copy I ordered. Neither Amazon, nor the publisher (Wiley) were of any help getting those two pages.


Feedback