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Raw Hardcover – Oct 29 2003


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 216 pages
  • Publisher: Ten Speed Press (Oct. 29 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1580084702
  • ISBN-13: 978-1580084703
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 2.3 x 28.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #945,429 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Ever trendy, raw food is crunching its way into the mainstream-and this book by celebrity chef Trotter (Charlie Trotter Cooks at Home) and Klein demonstrates how appetizing it can be. The collection of vegan recipes, all cooked at temperatures below 118°F, is decidedly gourmet. Dishes worthy of dinner parties include Three Peppercorn-Crusted Cashew Cheese with Honeycomb and Balsamic Vinegar, Salsify with Black Truffles and Porcini Mushrooms, Portobello Mushroom Pave with White Asparagus Vinaigrette, Indian Red Peaches with Vanilla Ice Cream (made with almond milk) and Banana Chocolate Tart with Caramel and Chocolate Sauces. Wine notes with each recipe remind readers that raw food can be complemented by a fine vintage without breaking any rules because "wine, at its most basic, is also an unadulterated creation, never rising above 118°F during its production." The recipes tend to be labor intensive since the taste, textures and flavor of sophisticated raw food can't be bought pre-packaged at the supermarket. But for those who want to reap the reported health benefits of raw food without sacrificing the luxurious taste of fine cuisine, the effort required for these recipes is worthwhile.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

Anyone who wants to understand American cuisine as it enters the 21st century must eat at Charlie Trotter'¬?s. . . . No restaurant in America comes closer to delivering a flawless total dining experience. -Wine Spectator, naming Charlie Trotter'¬?s as America'¬?s Best Restaurant"There'¬?s a whole philosophy behind this cuisine, but for Klein it'¬?s more about sensuality and bringing out the best in food. . . . Klein has uncovered a seemingly unlimited palette of flavors. She breaks every preconceived notion about a vegetarian diet. . . . Whether carnivore, vegetarian, glutton or gourmet, the food will make you a believer." -San Francisco Chronicle"Roxanne Klein is in charge of the Bay Area'¬?s (if not the country'¬?s) most talked-about kitchen. At her living-foods restaurant in Larkspur, almost all the food is raw. The results are both innovative and spectacular."-Bon App?©tit"Roxanne Klein'¬?s artistry. . . is rocking the elite food world. . . . Adventurous home cooks as well as chefs may be inspired to learn some of her techniques and to look at vegetables with a fresh eye."-Gourmet

 


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on May 27 2004
Format: Hardcover
As other reviews suggest, this cookbook is filled with complex recipes that frequently call for out-of-the-ordinary ingredients and food preparation techniques such as soaking, dehydrating, blending and sieving. Yet the results are worth every bit of the effort.
In exploring living foods, I've found other chefs' approaches to be too raw (salads, salads and more salads) or too intent on emulating cooked foods (nut loaf, seed cheese, sprouted breads). Frequently raw chefs deliver recipes that are variations of these same basic themes. This book transcends all of that.
Even when I'm preparing something that resembles a raw food basic, e.g. a soup made from fruit/vegetable juice, the results when following Charlie and Roxanne's recipes are completely different than expected, complex, layered, with lots of nuance to appreciate. The asparagus soup is a delectable example of this. Another is Roxanne's signature appetizer at her restaurant and opening recipe in this book, the Wakame Sushi Rolls. Many people dabbling or dedicated to living foods will likely have seen raw sushi rolls, in which soaked crushed nuts or ground root vegetable take the place of the rice in the roll. In Roxanne's version, the spice/vinegar/honey addition to ground parsnips is truly unique and lifts the raw sushi roll out of the reliance on nuts.
The most relevant grumble I have with the book: there are several dishes which require the preparation of four to seven distinct recipes. The Wakame Sushi rolls consist of four recipes plus the dicing/slicing of roll veggies. The Tacos Three Ways is the most egregious example I've noticed, with eight recipes in total to deliver the dish as written. Still, there are several dishes that are a straight, single recipe or two.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Patricia Brogan on Jan. 20 2004
Format: Hardcover
Roxanne Klein's cuisine is an appealing blend of funk and sophistication. Unlike co-author Charlie Trotter, she doesn't hold back when it comes to forthright ethnic flavor profiles (although she doesn't always push her ethnic dishes much beyond their traditional forms). Her composed entrees and salads, which show Trotter's input more clearly, are in some ways even more inspiring. Bright, intense, and often quite rich, Klein's dishes will astonish diners who expect raw food to be simple, austere, or cold. It seems like magic: one constantly asks, how on earth did she make those taco-shells, or those "fried" onions, or that rice-like sushi filling?
This cookbook provides the answers, but may not give readers quite all the information they need to pull off similar culinary miracles at home. The lean prose is sometimes less than communicative: for example, she tells us to allow her cashew cheese to "ripen" for 12 hours, but gives no clue to the smell, texture, or taste that lets us know when ripeness has been achieved. The same is true for her rejuvelac recipe. One is left to cook by the numbers.
More information about the preparation and acquisition of the exotic ingredients she uses would also have been nice. It's hard to imagine that most people know how to open a young coconut, much less how to extract the flesh in such a way that it can be julienned. Recommended substitutions for the specific mushrooms, chiles, fruits and sea-vegetables she uses would also be helpful. On the other hand, most readers of gourmet cookbooks are used to a little creative participation when it comes to realizing a fancy dish, and her plating, portion and flavor concepts leave plenty of room for flexibility.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lincoln Heartsong on Dec 11 2003
Format: Hardcover
Finally! The long wait was worth it. Charlie Trotter and Roxanne Klein have raised the bar and given us a beautiful, inspiring version of raw "haute cuisine".
I have been "raw" for well over a year and have been consistently dismayed by the lack of exciting and delicious recipes. Even so-called gourmet books (like Julianno's overly celebrated "Raw: the Un-cook book") are little more than a bunch of ingredients clumsily thrown together in a barage of contrasting flavors. In the hands of Trotter & Klein, however, raw cuisine has finally risen above crunch salads and the hard core health approach. These recipes are an exquisite interplay of flavors and textures... fresh, surprising and perfectly balanced. I've been thrilled with each of the creations I've tried so far!
One nice thing about this collaboration is that it presents raw food at its beautiful, sublime best. No heavy handed propoganda, health warnings or "holier than thou" approach. The gorgeous photos and recipes speak for themselves. Klein's introduction sums up the raw approach to life simply and succinctly.
As a professionally trained chef, I am the first to admit this book is not for everyone. It has a great format and layout with stunning photographs on every page. And while most of the recipes seem fairly straight forward to me, there is little here that one could throw together quickly for dinner. Trotter is well-known for his amazing palate and fairly complex approach to food (though he still considers it keeping things simple!). Like most fine food, several of the recipes have numerous stages, steps and sauces; many of the ingredients seem a bit obscure to those who aren't "foodies". None of Trotter's books are for the novice and RAW proves no exception.
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