CDN$ 49.11
  • List Price: CDN$ 77.95
  • You Save: CDN$ 28.84 (37%)
Usually ships within 2 to 4 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Real-Time 3D Terrain Engines Using C++ and DirectX9 Paperback – Jun 30 2003


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 49.11
CDN$ 49.11 CDN$ 2.34

2014 Books Gift Guide
Thug Kitchen, adapted from the wildly popular web site beloved by Gwyneth Paltrow ("This might be my favorite thing ever"), is featured in our 2014 Books Gift Guide. More gift ideas

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Paperback: 374 pages
  • Publisher: Charles River Media; 1 edition (June 30 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1584502045
  • ISBN-13: 978-1584502043
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 18.8 x 2.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 794 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #775,899 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

PART I: A Foundation In 3d 1 Chapter1 Getting Started With Directx 9.0 Andd3dx Chapter 2 Fundamental 3d Objects Chapter 3 The High-Level Shader Language Chapter 4 Gaia Engine Overview PART II: Introduction To Terrain Systems 97 Chapter 5 World Management Chapter 6 Basic Terrain Geometry Chapter7 The Roam Terrain System Chapter 8 Tiled Geometry Techniques Chapter 9 Texturing Techniques PART III: Extending The Engine 221 Chapter 10 Big Sky Country Chapter 11 Rendering Outdoor Scenes Chapter 12 The 3d Gardener Chapter 13 Ocean Water Appendix A Gaia Utility Classes Appendix B Floating-Point Tricks Appendix C Programming Reference Sheets Appendix D Recommended Reading Appendix E About The CD-Rom

About the Author

Greg Snook (Sammamish, WA) has been a game programmer and artist for over eight years. He has worked on a number of successful games with several game development companies. He currently works as an Xbox programmer for Bungie Studios, and has contributed to all three volumes of the Game Programming Gems series.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback
Not an easy book to learn from, all the code from the first demo program on up use the (complicated) final engine to do their rendering, and you'll have to go spelunking through it to try and figure out what's going on. The emphasis of this book is on the whole game engine itself and you're locked into his way of doing it, you're never given smaller programs that teach you how to do specific topics, it's all or nothing.
The first third of the book barely touches on terrain, you'll get overviews of things like memory management, resource pools, High Level Shader Language, render queue's, and a dozen other topics. And if you already have your own systems for these things or don't like his systems, too bad, because they are interwoven in the code throughout the rest of the book and it's difficult to seperate it out.
Like the review above, I have to agree that the terrain looks a bit aged for such a new book, and it runs slow on my P4 2.4ghz with GeForceFX card. I've seen plenty of recent games that look much better and run smooth as silk on my setup. You'll need a very high end system for his techniques to run smoothly on.
It's hard to recommend this book when you'll find much better tutorial code on the internet that's more to the point and has better looking results than you will get in this book. It does bring many techniques all together, but not in an easily learnable format when it comes to actually programming it.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
Not an easy book to learn from, all the code from the first demo program on up use the (complicated) final engine to do their rendering, and you'll have to go spelunking through it to try and figure out what's going on. The emphasis of this book is on the whole game engine itself and you're locked into his way of doing it, you're never given smaller programs that teach you how to do specific topics, it's all or nothing.
The first third of the book barely touches on terrain, you'll get overviews of things like memory management, resource pools, High Level Shader Language, render queue's, and a dozen other topics. And if you already have your own systems for these things or don't like his systems, too bad, because they are interwoven in the code throughout the rest of the book and it's difficult to seperate it out.
Like the review above, I have to agree that the terrain looks a bit aged for such a new book, and it runs slow on my P4 2.4ghz with GeForceFX card. I've seen plenty of recent games that look much better and run smooth as silk on my setup. You'll need a very high end system for his techniques to run smoothly on.
It's hard to recommend this book when you'll find much better tutorial code on the internet that's more to the point and has better looking results than you will get in this book. It does bring many techniques all together, but not in an easily learnable format when it comes to actually programming it.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
I got my copy of this book today. So far I've read through chapter 6 and have been very impressed. The introduction to 3D concepts is appropriately brief (I hate when an intermediate level book spends 3 chapters on matrices and vectors). I like how Snook ties the terrain into a realistic 3D engine (Gaia). Many authors sidestep this daunting task and just build on top of generic, dysfunctional skeletons.
My only critique of the book so far is that it seems to only focus on shader enabled hardware. On my Geforce 2 TI, all of the demos run in software emulation mode (ouch). The first few demos run at .5 FPS. Nothing beyond that will even run. The book is very clear about this requirement from the start, but I still would have liked to see a progression from "antique" hardware like mine to the more advanced shader-friendly stuff. There's still a lot of 3D cards out there that aren't shader enabled so I am hesitant to make this a requirement for my current project (which is why I haven't upgraded my GF2).
This book has and will still be useful; it will just take some work discerning what is valid given my conservative requirements. ...
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
The picture on the cover of this book seems to be a screenshot of the culminating demo from the final chapter. That's the type of world you can expect to build with the code presented. It isn't pretty, it isn't efficient. My home computer is a slightly long in the tooth 1.2GHz machine with a Geforce 3. The final sample runs at about 10fps and shows really noticable draw in, all while managing to look really really bad.
The actual content of the book is passable, but there really isn't anything in here you can't find done better on-line. Most of the ideas presented are sound, though none revolutionary. I just really have to take everything presented with a grain of salt seeing how poor the end product is.
You could read the section on animating water, but then look at the water in the demo. Texture blending is covered, but the texturing in the demo is horrible. The terrain is randomly generated, the methods are described in the book, and once again the final result really fails to impress with overly bumpy, not in the least realistic feeling terrain.
The bottom line is that the author of this book produced the demos in this book using the methods presented. If the included demos are the best the author could do, you don't want to be using any of it as the basis for your work.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most recent customer reviews



Feedback