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Reap the Whirlwind: The Untold Story of 6 Group, Canada's Bomber Force of World War II Paperback – Sep 1 1992


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 437 pages
  • Publisher: McClelland & Stewart (Sept. 1 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0771029268
  • ISBN-13: 978-0771029264
  • Product Dimensions: 20.6 x 14.7 x 3.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 386 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #386,096 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By Rick Tyefisher on April 19 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you're a World War II history buff of Bomber Command, you'll find this work a great addition to your collection. Well written and factual it seems.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Aussie Reader on July 7 2001
Format: Paperback
'Reap The Whirlwind' is one of the best books I have read in recent years on the men and machines of the Royal Air Force's Bomber Command during World War Two. First published in 1992 by Crecy Books Ltd this title tells the "untold" story of 6 Group, Canada's bomber force of WWII. As the title suggests the story is about the role of the Canadian contribution to the nighttime bomber campaign against occupied Europe during the Second World War.
However the stories within the book reflect the awful war as experienced by all bomber crews during this horrific campaign. I found the personal accounts to be sad, heroic and sometimes funny but the image that remained in my mind after finishing this book was the untold numbers of men who died and never had the chance to tell their stories. How many crews left their bases on a mission never to return and none of their comrades and families ever knew what happened to them?
They were swallowed up in the dark of night and became victims of German night-fighters or flak, their planes never seen again. After reading this book you'll get an understanding of what these men went through, some of the stories are just mind numbing. In particular is the story of Andrew C. Mynarski, 6 Group's sole Victoria Cross winner. This brave 27-year-old Canadian was a mid-upper gunner on a 419 Squadron Lancaster who lost his life during a mission in June 1944 (pages 276-278).
The narrative is fast paced, informative but never boring or dull. The story is well told and is a brilliant account of the harsh realities of an aerial bombing campaign as conducted by the RAF over Germany. The book starts with an introduction to the first bomber offensive in 1917 and finishes with an account of the 1990 reunion of the survivors.
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By K Scheffler on Oct. 7 2004
Format: Hardcover
Canadians served with the RAF from the outset of the war, and were represented in significant numbers in Bomber Command. Midway during the war, Group 6--an all-Canadian formation--was created, and this is it's story. I've read a number of Spencer Dunmore's books, and I'd have to say that this one is the best. Both readable and informative, this book really gives one a sense of what the war was like for members of this formation, and no doubt will be a book that will educate future generations on the role that Canadians played in the air offensive against the Third Reich.
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By A Customer on Aug. 2 2001
Format: Paperback
As I have a great interest in the happenings of Bomber Command during W.W.II because my brother flew with 431 Iroquois Sqdn during this time. I have read the book and continue to use it as a reference when I need to know something. It is a "MUST" for anyone interested in the truth of what really went on and who were not there to witness it. I even managed to come accross the name of my brothers Pilot when he reported a run-in with a JU-88 If you are serious about this subject I strongly recomend this book as I have to a number of people already. Full marks to the authors for their research and for puting together something worthwhile to read
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Excellent Account of Canadians in Bomber Command July 7 2001
By Aussie Reader - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
`Reap The Whirlwind' is one of the best books I have read in recent years on the men and machines of the Royal Air Force's Bomber Command during World War Two. First published in 1992 by Crecy Books Ltd this title tells the "untold" story of 6 Group, Canada's bomber force of WWII. As the title suggests the story is about the role of the Canadian contribution to the nighttime bomber campaign against occupied Europe during the Second World War.
However the stories within the book reflect the awful war as experienced by all bomber crews during this horrific campaign. I found the personal accounts to be sad, heroic and sometimes funny but the image that remained in my mind after finishing this book was the untold numbers of men who died and never had the chance to tell their stories. How many crews left their bases on a mission never to return and none of their comrades and families ever knew what happened to them?
They were swallowed up in the dark of night and became victims of German night-fighters or flak, their planes never seen again. After reading this book you'll get an understanding of what these men went through, some of the stories are just mind numbing. In particular is the story of Andrew C. Mynarski, 6 Group's sole Victoria Cross winner. This brave 27-year-old Canadian was a mid-upper gunner on a 419 Squadron Lancaster who lost his life during a mission in June 1944 (pages 276-278).
The narrative is fast paced, informative but never boring or dull. The story is well told and is a brilliant account of the harsh realities of an aerial bombing campaign as conducted by the RAF over Germany. The book starts with an introduction to the first bomber offensive in 1917 and finishes with an account of the 1990 reunion of the survivors. The authoritative text has numerous personal accounts of the aircrews woven into the story and overall the book reads well.
The only complaint I have with this book is the standard of the photographs. I would have liked more and of a better quality. Regardless of that this is still a great story and I think that anyone who has an interest in this period or who really wants to understand why these men did what they did and what happened to them then this is the book to read.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A Great Book Oct. 7 2004
By K Scheffler - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Canadians served with the RAF from the outset of the war, and were represented in significant numbers in Bomber Command. Midway during the war, Group 6--an all-Canadian formation--was created, and this is it's story. I've read a number of Spencer Dunmore's books, and I'd have to say that this one is the best. Both readable and informative, this book really gives one a sense of what the war was like for members of this formation, and no doubt will be a book that will educate future generations on the role that Canadians played in the air offensive against the Third Reich.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Reap The Whirlwind Aug. 2 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
As I have a great interest in the happenings of Bomber Command during W.W.II because my brother flew with 431 Iroquois Sqdn during this time. I have read the book and continue to use it as a reference when I need to know something. It is a "MUST" for anyone interested in the truth of what really went on and who were not there to witness it. I even managed to come accross the name of my brothers Pilot when he reported a run-in with a JU-88 If you are serious about this subject I strongly recomend this book as I have to a number of people already. Full marks to the authors for their research and for puting together something worthwhile to read
Canadians Pitch In Sept. 19 2013
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
'The Colonials' (an insult spoken by Regular RAF officers) demonstrated bravery during punishing night bombing missions over Germany, and when the ground campaign needed tactical bombing. Equipped with English craft, flying from the same bases, contributing aircraft and crews to the same dangerous targets- these flyers did outstanding work.
This was called 'area bombing', to deny housing, utilities and transport to Hitler's industries. To empty Essen, Munich, or Berlin of workers and create refugees. But they had to run a gauntlet of night fighters, guns, and bad weather. Especially Berlin.
Because Hitler had 'Sown the wind', read this:
'Most of the ex-airmen have had to put up with the self-righteous with their accusing stares, the kids who were not even born when the last Lancaster was struck off charge, who demand to know how decent Canadians could have brought themselves to drop bombs on civilians, putting Dresden to the torch, blowing Berliners to bits. Why didn't they refuse to fly on such missions? In vain it is explained that you really had to be there at the time, you had to experience the bitterness of the struggle, the total commitment to defeat the enemy by any means at hand. However much one may mourn the fact, declarations of brotherly (and sisterly) love are not notably effective protection against the ambitions of despots. The kids will have to discover this for themselves, and one can only hope that it will be history that teaches them.' (p. 368)
In the end, RAF saw the men of 6 Group as just fellow combatants.

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