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Rebecca [Blu-ray]


List Price: CDN$ 21.99
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Rebecca [Blu-ray] + Notorious [Blu-ray] + The Apartment [Blu-ray] (Bilingual)
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Product Details

  • Actors: Laurence Olivier
  • Directors: Alfred Hitchcock
  • Format: NTSC, Subtitled
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: MGM
  • Release Date: Oct. 9 2012
  • Run Time: 131 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (116 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0065N6JSI
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #29,298 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Amazon.ca

Rebecca is an ageless, timeless adult movie about a woman who marries a widower but fears she lives in the shadow of her predecessor. This was Hitchcock's first American feature, and it garnered the Best Picture statue at the 1941 Academy Awards. In today's films, most twists and surprises are ridiculous or just gratuitous, so it's sobering to look back on this film where every revelation not only shocks, but makes organic sense with the story line. Laurence Olivier is dashing and weak, fierce and cowed. Joan Fontaine is strong yet submissive, defiant yet accommodating. There isn't a false moment or misstep, but the film must have killed the employment outlook of any women named Danvers for about 20 years. Brilliant stuff. --Keith Simanton

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on Dec 14 2003
Format: DVD
Note: Get the Criterion DVD before it is too late! (It's supposed to go out of print on the 31st of December, 2003). While Hitchcock's masterpiece is still stunning after all these years, the DVD I watched, published by Anchor Bay, is pretty weak; the Criterion Collection DVD of "Rebecca" has much more in the way of extras and special features, which is half the appeal of getting a classic on DVD.
Anchor Bay's DVD only has a chapter selection and "start" on the menu. Not even closed captioning, which makes this DVD inaccessible to older or deaf fans.
Still, even a weak DVD presentation can't take away from such a beautiful film. A TV presenter recently introduced "Rebecca", by saying that Joan Fontaine was too pretty to be believable in the role of a plain girl. Missing the point! "Rebecca" is a story from the point of view of a scared, insecure heroine who believes the worst of herself and is always waiting for the other shoe to drop. Like the heroine of "Northanger Abbey," perhaps the gothic atmosphere here is really created out of her hopes and fears - "Rashomon"-style where each person sees a different thing. The book "Venus in Spurs" has most of a chapter devoted to "Rebecca," and how much this film and book relate to women who struggle through insecurity, despite being loved. (To say more might ruin the movie for first-time viewers).
Fontaine is, of course, very good, as is Laurence Olivier, who has scarcely *ever* been more handsome and commanding. Among the strong supporting cast is George Saunders and Dame Judith Anderson. While Anderson's usually singled out in reviews and hindsight, her obsessive maid could hardly be that malevolent, if the audience didn't feel so sympathetic towards Fontaine's sweet, mild Mrs. de Winter.
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Format: DVD
Joan Fontaine laments as she opens the film, obviously several years removed from her time at the lush, oversized estate, which recalls "Tara" from Gone With the Wind as a residence which is actually also a character in the movie. People remember the houses from these two films almost more than the characters. No coincidence that both films were produced by the ridiculously meticulous David O. Selznick. GWtW was of course the most popular film of all time, so Selznick figured he had the right idea about how to make a film. Details, right down to the last corner.
Alfred Hitchcock had made a career in London making films with complete autonomy. He basically called all the shots. When he got to America, he signed a four movie deal with Selznick. Rebecca is the first and best of the three. (no, not a mistake, I'll explain later) Rebecca was the only film by Hitchcock to win best picture from the Academy, although Hitch did not win best director. The film was basically a tug of war between producer and director. Selznick wanted the book followed religiously, Hitch wanted to take the basic idea of the book and add his own touches. Selznick wouldn't allow it, so Hitch was forced to make the film exactly by the book.
The film stars Fontaine as an unnamed young woman who while working as a paid companion for the unbearable Mrs. Van Hopper (Florence Bates), she meets and falls in love with the brooding Maxim de Winter (Lawrence Olivier). They marry after a quick courtship and go "home" to Manderley, Olivier's mammoth estate. Fontaine is very young and has no idea what she is getting into, especially when it dawns on her that Olivier's late first wife, Rebecca, still dominates the house.
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Format: VHS Tape
What distinguishes a true thriller from its more modest counterparts is that in the former a sense of eerie menace permeates throughout. Director Alfred Hitchcock, in his debut as a Hollywood director, began the first in a long line of effective character-driven dramas in which the protagonist must struggle through a maze of conflicting levels of reported truths before hitting the one that rings true. With REBECCA, Hitchcock takes the novel by Daphne Du Maurier in which a second wife must contend with the suffocating presence of the late first wife. What stamps REBECCA as a timeless film that explores the degree to which tormented minds hold onto the past even at the cost of the loss of the present is the seamless melding of mood to plot. The dark and brooding English landscape ought to have been listed in the actors' credits, so thoroughly does it impact on the audience. The magnificent mansion of Manderly is situated on a moor that seems right out of WUTHERING HEIGHTS--no surprise there since Lawrence Olivier, who played Heathcliffe, now is Maxim de Winter, a soul who is as every bit as troubled and moody as the demented hero of Emily Bronte's novel. Maxim has recently lost his wife Rebecca to drowning, a loss that occurred before the first reel. Enter Joan Fontaine as the second Mrs. de Winter, a shy and insecure woman who is overwhelmed by the constant and heavy reminder that as far as the de Winters are concerned, she may have the name of de Winter, but not the grace to carry it. Maxim has a housekeeper, Mrs. Danvers (Judith Anderson), who is exactly the menace-laden harpy that was to occupy so many of Hitchcock's future films. Mrs.Danvers is polite enough but her expressionless face and monotone voice nevertheless convey her stark disapproval of her master's new wife.Read more ›
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