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Red Cockroaches [Import]


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Product Details

  • Actors: Adam Plotch, Talia Rubel, Diane Spodarek, Jeff Pucillo, Limor Shopen
  • Directors: Miguel Coyula
  • Writers: Miguel Coyula
  • Producers: Adam Plotch, Miguel Coyula, Steve Pieczenik, Suzana Dejkanovic
  • Format: Color, DVD-Video, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Heretic Films
  • Release Date: Sept. 27 2005
  • Run Time: 82 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
  • ASIN: B000AS1KWY
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa0a0b330) out of 5 stars 6 reviews
14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa0a16ed0) out of 5 stars You will not believe what you just saw! Aug. 30 2005
By MA - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
This film is truly unique. Cult classic is a term that is often overused, but Red Cockroaches is a film that leaves a lasting impression and I strongly feel will have staying power. Love it or hate it you will think about it long after the movie is over.

The film is full of dazzling visual imagery and stunning colorization...it feels at times a bit like Sin City, other times more like Mulholland Drive, and other times like nothing I've ever seen! The editing is incredibly creative, the acting is strong, and the movie grabs your attention from the opening shot of a futuristic NY skyline all the way to a very jarring climax.

This movie is creating a lot of buzz and after seeing the film I know why. Do yourself a favor and check this movie out!
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa0a192f4) out of 5 stars This is independent Filmmaking at its Finest Oct. 4 2005
By D. Holt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
RED COCKROACHES is a disturbing movie because of the subject matter and it makes a really big statement. A movie does not have to have millions of dollars or big name Actors to be really good.

When you consider how Writer/Director/Producer/Editor/ComposerMiguel Coyula made this movie for only $2000, the man is nothing short of a brilliant filmmaker. I'm in awe of his talent and skills and of the talented Actors in the film. GREAT JOB! A fantastic, surreal, disturbing, odd, artistic gem of a film.
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa0a1936c) out of 5 stars Technical Interest Only March 5 2008
By El Picaro - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
The fact that this was made with consumer equipment and has bigger budget look makes it worth watching for the aspiring no-budget Feature maker but the plot is nothing more than shock masquerading as a compelling story.
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa0a19114) out of 5 stars Confusing July 22 2006
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A man keeps running into a mysterious woman, at the train station, at a grave-site.

She has a French accent. Then she turns up at his mother's house as his long lost sister - only she's lost the accent. His infatuation with her continues and they have sex, knowing full well their own blood relationship. Other sex, more deviant is mostly hinted at... such as when Lily (first time actress Talia Rubel) asks her brother Adam (played by Adam Plotch) if he really loves her, that he'd accept anything from her body - then asks if he's thirsty.

Throughout the film cockroaches appear that glow red - for some reason I didn't follow. Another mystery is a friend of the man who appears with massive square reading glasses, a lot like "Brains" from the Thunderbirds, or Trevor Horn from the band "The Buggles"
3 of 9 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa0a193fc) out of 5 stars Much ado about nothing July 24 2006
By K. D. Kelly - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
In a post-apocalyptic world littered with UFOs and mutant insects, a rather dull man stumbles across a sultry femme fatale who happens to be missing a tooth that occasionally smoulders and, upon being busted open, encases a bug -- kind of like how Mexican jumping beans are inchworm traps. In this world also exists a corporation with the ability to clone people and inject the bodies with memories of the original. "Red Cockroaches" is a surreal drama told in the vein of "Eraserhead;" like a vivid, whiskey-fueled dream, there are clues to meaning (such as: How precious are our experiences if memory can be distilled in the petri dish?) but these clues never quite rise to the level of sense. In fact, just as "Being John Malkovich" obsesses over the idea of lesbian sex via a man-sized puppet, "Red Cockroaches" is too much concerned with a fantasy of incestuous love. Director Miguel Coyula definitely has a knack for spinning yarns without a budget and capturing odd angles on film, and he's a whiz in the editing room -- but when it comes to the writing, he's a bit like a geezer trying to chew through a steak with his gums. When later viewed resting on its plate, grown cold and tough, there are only vague imprints as evidence that energy was spent converting beef into bites -- or images and dialogue into plot.


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