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Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code Hardcover – Jun 28 1999


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional; 1 edition (June 28 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0201485672
  • ISBN-13: 978-0201485677
  • Product Dimensions: 23.9 x 19.3 x 2.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (96 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #17,865 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Dissatisfied on March 15 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book contains some good information on how to improve yourexisting code without rewriting it entirely which is a nice departurefrom the norm of most of these UML-type books which advocate totally changing the way you design and build software. Not that the Unified method of designing and building is bad, its just that its hard to change the way this is done in an organization when you're not in charge of the organization. Mr. Fowler has put forth a mechanism for improving the design of existing code while adding functionality to it. And the information, once culled from the surrounding text, is extremely useful. It's not paradigm shift. And it's not a companion to Design Patterns - Fowler mentions the Design Patterns book throughout his text but this book is certainly not written for the same audience. Fowler never once gives an example where he converts bad code into good by utilizing a pattern from the Gang of Four's book. The book is useful for ANY object-oriented language even though he uses Java in his examples the principles map easily to C++ and SmallTalk. Almost all of the techniques are common sense and yet he spends the bulk of this book explaining in simple terms how to perform them. For each "refactoring" he capably provided a two or three sentence overview of the process, and a code fragment or class diagram exemplifying the technique. These summaries and figures are excellent. But his tone becomes condescending as he painfully explains the process of performing the code improvement. For instance, Extract Method, the first technique in the book, is succinctly described with: "[If] You have a code fragment that can be grouped together...[then] Turn the fragment into a method whose name explains the purpose of the method.Read more ›
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By khorchani on Feb. 6 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Even after many years, it remains good ressource and a must have book for an IT professional.
I advise evry programmer to get it
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Format: Hardcover
Like the Gang of Four's landmark book _Design Patterns_, Fowler and his cohorts have created another catalog-style book, this time on refactoring.
Refactoring refers to taking existing, working software, and changing it about to improve its design, so that future modifications and enhancements are easier to add. _Refactoring_ is primarily a catalog of 70 or so different kinds of improvements you can make to object-oriented software.
Each entry in the catalog describes an implementation problem, the solution, motivation for applying the solution, the mechanics of the refactoring, and examples. The book's examples are all in Java, but C++ programmers should be able to approach the refactorings with ease. Often, Fowler diagrams the refactorings in UML, so a little Unified Modeling Language experience will help, too.
While the catalog is nice, the kinds of refactorings are obvious is most cases. Even moderately experienced programmers won't need the step-by-step mechanics described. The real benefit, though, is that the mechanics of each refactoring help guarantee that you can pull off the refactoring without introducing new bugs or side effects. They encourage you to take smaller, verifiable steps, than the more gross refactorings that most developers would naturally take. You actually save time doing so.
How do you know your refactorings are safe? Unit testing is the answer that Fowler et al. provide. Java developers will find the introduction to the Junit Testing Framework the most valuable part of the book, more so than the catalog of refactorings itself.
There's more to the book than the catalog and Junit, of course.
Read more ›
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Dec 17 2000
Format: Hardcover
The subject matter is very pertinent, but the book could have been more to the point. Some of the pages have only four lines of code; I could not understand why so much of space was left blank. Many of the techniques taught are not new and should be part of development and refactoring. It would have been nice if the authors went through each other's manuscripts and REFACTORED the book, because the book is full of repetitive material.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Vladimir Levin on July 9 2004
Format: Hardcover
Fowler's refactoring has become a classic in the field of popular software engineering books. It's a good book that clearly explains the basic ideas of refactoring and develops a standard vocabulary for refactoring; the power of this vocabulary is demonstrated by the development tools like IntelliJ Idea and Eclipse that now incorporate its nomenclature directly to allow rapid automated refactoring. Refactoring together with Test-Driven development, both concepts developed largely by Kent Beck as part of his Extreme Programming methodology, are in my opinion the most powerful and innovative ideas in the last 10 years or so in software development. It is a fairly quick read for an experienced developer, and often admittedly presents concepts that any experienced develop would have discovered on his/her own. Nevertheless, all of the refacorings together in one book serve as an excellent reference and reminder. I think this book certainly belongs on the bookshelf of any developer wishing to improve his or her craft.
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