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Product Details

  • Actors: Mark Wahlberg, Helena Bonham Carter, Tim Roth, Michael Clarke Duncan, Paul Giamatti
  • Directors: Tim Burton
  • Writers: Lawrence Konner, Mark Rosenthal, Pierre Boulle, William Broyles Jr.
  • Producers: Iain Smith, Katterli Frauenfelder, Ralph Winter
  • Format: NTSC
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • VHS Release Date: Nov. 20 2001
  • Run Time: 119 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (74 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00003CXXU

Product Description

Special Features

The DVD release of Tim Burton's Planet of the Apes is so loaded that the second disc needs six screens to list all of the features--or maybe it's just an excuse to show off the great-looking animated menus. The most interesting features are six substantial documentaries about aspects of the filming, including examinations of how the apes run and a spotlight on Lake Powell, where both this film and the 1968 original were shot. The "enhanced viewing mode" on disc 1 is fun: picture-in-picture video segments offer actor comments or shots of sets and miniatures, and Easter eggs provide access to even more background on the visual effects. There's also a commentary track by Burton (he had to be convinced to remake Apes) and another one with isolated score by composer Danny Elfman, discussing how he works with frequent collaborator Burton and the current state of film composing. But don't expect Burton to give an explanation of the film's much-discussed conclusion, and no alternate ending appears among the DVD's five rather routine extended scenes. --David Horiuchi --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Theo TOP 500 REVIEWER on Feb. 16 2013
Format: DVD
Tim Burton is undeniably one of the great stylists of popular cinema. I don't just mean that on a purely visual level, either. When he's at his absolute best, somehow the style actually becomes the substance. If that doesn't seem to make sense, consider Ed Wood. It was Burton's decision to approach his chosen subject in the romanticized, even loving way that he did that made that film what it was. And it was glorious.

But... There are times when something more fundamental is called for, and this was one of them. And to be brutally honest, that more fundamental something just wasn't there in this particular movie.

If you're going to remake a film that's one of the standing icons of its genre, that's a pretty tough gig. Most especially so when the film you've chosen to remake is so well known for its moments: moments that come to define the film in our imaginations and to make it what it is. If you just copy those moments verbatim, then your film is in turn just a copy, and a pale one at that. Mere repetition is never going to have the same impact as the original. On the other hand, once you've taken those moments away, if you can't replace them with something equally staggering, or at least repackage and reinterpret the original material in a genuinely surprising way, then once again, there's really very little point in bothering with the remake at all.

Unfortunately, there really was very little point in bothering with this particular remake at all. That's about as much as I can say without letting loose with the spoilers.

There are positive things to say about this movie. Visually it was every bit the feast one would expect from a Tim Burton film - simultaneously cartoonish and intensely hyper-real. It also contains two truly exceptional performances.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jerry Vogel on July 3 2004
Format: DVD
I'm an "Apes" kid who grew up on Planet Of The Apes, Beneath The Planet Of The Apes, Escape From The Planet Of The Apes, Conquest Of The Planet Of The Apes, Battle For The Planet Of The Apes, Return To The Planet Of the Apes animated series, The Planet Of The Apes comic book series, The Planet Of The Apes TV series, The Planet Of The Apes novel...I loved all of this Apes stuff. Why? Because it was FUN. Sadly it seems those days are gone for good and their ain't too many folks left who get the fun of these sort of things. It's clear that Tim Burton still gets it. He obviously loves the Apes movies and he grew up with all of those same movies and fun Ape toys that I did. His version is a loving tribute to that period of time in his childhood when the whole world seemed to have gone ape. He's even thrown in an ending that's not unlike the ending of the original novel. That novel inspired the movies, but none of them tried to stay true to that idea until Burton's version. Burton is obviously a fan of the Apes craze that made many a youngster want to battle talking apes or be talking apes. He captures that sense of wonder that many of us experienced in our Ape invaded youth, but he also doesn't take the whole thing too damn seriously. There are plenty of laughs here too. It's a big fun talking Apes movie that's just as much FUN as the ones that so many of us loved in the old days. I wondered, laughed, marveled, and had a great time being a kid again. I couldn't have asked for anything more. If Burton hadn't directed this thing I'm sure I would have got a hell of a lot less. Burton "gets" FUN.
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Format: VHS Tape
Planet of the Apes is the remake of the 1968 blockbuster and sci-fi classic. I read all the criticisms that this movie absorbed prior to seeing it, so I was pre-warned you could say. But I like Burton, I think he's put together some original and well thought out films. However, the critics were right this time: this film sucks. As much as I compliment the exteriors of this film (costuming, Special effects, and visual pleasures) it's one hollow movie that lacks character development and interest.
Let's see, what should I rip first? Let's begin with Wahlburg, a poor excuse of an actor. He has no personality, none. No emotion, no believability, no interesting monologues, nothing. He's just there and we're forced to follow him. Heston's character Taylor is the ultimate model of character development. Here was a man who wanted to journey through space because he believed there was something out there better than man. By the end of the movie, he shows some human pride. Nothing like this is attempted through Wahlburg, other than some anti-zoo message.
How about the other characters? Tim Roth is fine as an evil general Thade who hates man, but no true explanation is given as to why. Unlike Dr. Zaius in the first one, who had plenty of reasons why he hated man, Thade just hates just to hate. Thade is also a bit over the top with his hatred, making him a mad ape irrational half the time.
Estella who? Talk about a pointless character. She served no purpose, talked like a typical Californian beach babe with air between the ears, and was primarily used to show skin and rub Wahlburg's shoulders. Nova, in the original, served as Heston's talk outlet, even though she never said a word back; sort of like a living "Wilson" in "Cast Away.
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