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Reveal Import


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Product Details

  • Audio CD (May 15 2001)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Warner Bros
  • ASIN: B00005BL29
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  DVD Audio  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (424 customer reviews)

1. The Lifting
2. I've Been High
3. All the Way to Reno (You're Gonna be a Star)
4. She Just Wants To Be
5. Disappear
6. Saturn Return
7. Beat a Drum
8. Imitation Of Life
9. Summer Turns To High
10. Chorus And The Ring
11. I'll Take The Rain
12. Beachball

Product Description

Product Description

This limited edition version features a custom sleeve that measure 8 inches square, a 40 page full colour booklet which includes photography by Michael Stipe and full album lyrics.

Amazon.ca

REM have no right, at this advanced stage in their career, to be making such spirited and beautiful music as that on Reveal. Twenty years after "Radio Free Europe", they're still jiggy as year-old pups. Reveal is the sound of a band who have moved beyond feeling the need to change or to prove themselves to each new generation, but still want to make music that expresses a passion for life. Michael Stipe's voice has never been more evocatively beautiful than it is on "I've Been High", and Peter Buck's eclectic tunesmithery has continued in the highly accessible vein it was mining on their previous album, Up. Those who yearn to hear the Stipe of old, mumbling incomprehensibly behind murky Byrds-u-like chords, will remain disappointed by his increasing emergence as an upfront vocalist whose lyrics, if never entirely self-explanatory, now make ingenious use of phrases, images and vignettes that anybody can identify with. Hovering over much of the album is the spirit of Brian Wilson, whose melodic and harmonic genius is echoed in "Beachball" and almost transcended in the astonishingly plangent "Summer Turns to High". With so much to live up to from "Losing My Religion" to "Man On the Moon", it's not far short of astonishing that REM can still come up with a song like "Imitation of Life", whose gorgeously chiming and shimmering chorus sets the heart soaring and the eyes misting over. That song alone would be worth the price of admission but, fortunately, from the first synthesiser swirls of the album's opener, "The Lifting", there's not a dud to be heard in the entire dozen cuts. --Johnny Black

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

By mr spillsy on June 18 2004
Format: Audio CD
This is a brilliant album. I bought it when it first came out and shelved it. I used to play it on and off and only really took notice of Beat A Drum and Immitation of Life.
I recently gave it more car play and it has finally hit the bell!!! I think what took it so long was the use of sound. There is a lot of unneccessary weirdness to it - squeeks here, distorted dont know what there - which distract from the greatness of the songs. Once you get over a certain amount of listening, those sounds melt away and the true song comes out. If they had kept this simple it would have been a massive hit.
Beat A Drum still remains my favourite - I can play it forever and not get bored. Its on a similar plain to Diminished from Up. I agree with another reviewer that Immitation Of Life sounds like The Great Beyond, but its more like a song from Out Of Time.
Stipe's voice remains great although its lost a touch of its tortured soulness to it.
So what could possibly be next from REM?
cheers
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Format: Audio CD
This is the newest album R.E.M. have to offer, and let me tell you, it's brilliant. There's something so warm and touching about this album, something most of their previous albums failed to reach. And while it's no Automatic, it should be considered a classic.
With the departure of Bill Berry, the bands drummer, fans of the old days believed that R.E.M. would never be the same again... how true. This is R.E.M. like you've never heard them before, happy and upbeat. The polar opposite to Automatic, actually.
You've probably heard the albums two main singles, Imitation Of Life and All The Way To Reno (You're Gonna Be A Star), which are both fantastic songs, and show that, even after a period of about 20 years, the band still know how to keep the auidence satisfied.
The opening, titled The Lifting, is a great way to start the album, and gives you a taste of what's to come. It makes me feel lightheaded! Couple this with beautiful tracks like I've Been High, She Just Wants To Be, and Beat A Drum, and you have a winner on your hands. Even the experimental The Chorus And The Ring proves to be a success!
The highlight of the album, however, is the exquisite I'll Take The Rain, perhaps the bands most beautiful and underrated song (though it did get an interesting music video!) This, in my eyes, makes the album worthy of purchase alone... it's just so sweet.
In case you haven't it out yet, this album is good. Very good. The fans obsessed with the IRS days poo-poo this album, but there's nothing wrong with showing your lighter side.
I recommend this album to everyone, whether you are a fan of the band, or not. It will touch you like it touched me.
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By Ryan Berg on April 28 2004
Format: Audio CD
R.E.M. make you work.
On the surface "Reveal" is a sunny pop album, an extended tribute to Brian Wilson that started with "At My Most Beautiful" from the previous album "Up". Yet once you delve under the surface there are darker shades, dank corners and a touch of the perverse.
R.E.M. don't write songs that fully reveal themselves on first listen and that's why I love this band. There is a new discovery waiting each time you play the CD. "Imitation of Life" is the obvious radio-friendly single that flexes the band's pop muscle. But songs like "All the Way to Reno" show the band's ability to write complex, innovative music. This song fuses a Roy Rogers vibe with an airy lounge styling. The chorus (You're going to be a star) is so filled with empty enthusiasm. The surface of the song is all effervescent and light: an optimistic anthem for the disenfranchised, but then the inherent sadness of the song unfolds (going to Reno to become a star?), and the listener is left with the paradox of such dualistic elements-all in the same song.
Other reviewers panned this album for being boring, lacking contagious melodies. And, admittedly, it took me a while to fully appreciate this album. The labored production, so lush and full, in contrast with sparse melodies married to the sunny vibe went over my head. Unlike the darker, starker "Up" which I instantly sank into, "Reveal" was the antithesis of its title. I found the album to be very stubborn and self-protective. But once I found my way in through songs like "She Just Wants to Be", "The Ring and the Chorus" and "Disappear" then other songs came more easily.
I still have problems with "Beat a Drum" and "Beachball".
Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD
I saw one review of this album that said this was REM's fire and slippers album,which is pretty accurate.Not to everyone's taste I guess but those of you who are prepared to put aside your prejudices after Bill Berry's departure and are prepared to give this album the numerous listens it requires will be suitably rewarded.It is quite simply REM's best album since 'Automatic For The People' and its beauty is only 'revealed' after several listens.Yes I prefer their old sound also, which is why it gets 4 stars instead of 5. But even I have to admit that the sonic production,ambience and general mood that this album portrays is the finest of their career. So listen to this album when you're feeling that life is getting you down and it owes you something. Listen to the lyrics, taste the ambience and be truly moved. REM, as already said, have no right to be making such wonderful records after 20 years. Cherish them, for you will never see their like again. Roll on 2004 for the next installment of this truly astonishing band.
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